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TABLES FOR FABLES
A collection of free tables for fantasy role-playing games.
 
Welcome to Tables for Fables. This is a collection of random tables, all of which:
 
  • have a fantasy theme,
  • are systemless - that is, don't use statistics or terms from a single game, and
  • use only normal, six-sided dice (d6s).
If you have a table that you want to contribute, please email me (news AT apolitical DOT info).
 
You can look at all 342 tables, or look at tables in a specific category:
 
Magic and Religion(36 entries)
Treasure(23 entries)
Wilderness and Worlds(52 entries)
Dungeons and Combat(42 entries)
Personalising Characters(90 entries)
Settlements and Countries(82 entries)
Adventure Ideas(87 entries)
Creating Creatures(32 entries)
 
Please note that magic items are in the Treasure section, not the Magic and Religion section.
 
Many of the ideas in these tables are used in the automatic Adventure Ideas Generator.
 
Detailed Monster Reactions A: Morale
source or inspiration: Roger the GS
 
To use this system, monsters should have a Morale rating from 2 to 12, where a high number indicates a high willingness to fight as opposed to run.
The GM should roll 2 dice, and subtract the total from the Morale rating.
If the heroes approach the monsters aggressively, this might increase the monster's Hostility but decrease their Morale.
If the heroes approach peacefully, this might have the opposite effect.
For more detailed modifiers, see the link above.
 
Roll 2 dice, use the total.
Monsters' Morale minus
the total of 2 dice.
-4 or lessOvercome
-1 to 1Impressed
0 or 1Wary
2 or 3Confident
4 or moreBold
 
 
Detailed Monster Reactions B: Hostility
source or inspiration: Roger the GS
 
Similarly, monsters should have a Hostility rating from 2 to 12, where a high number indicates a high willingness to fight as opposed to bargain.
The GM should roll 2 dice, and subtract the total from the Hostility rating.
If the heroes approach the monsters aggressively, this might increase the monster's Hostility but decrease their Morale.
If the heroes approach peacefully, this might have the opposite effect.
For more detailed modifiers, see the link above.
 
Roll 2 dice, use the total.
Monsters' Hostility minus
the total of 2 dice.
-5 or lessFriendly
-4 to -2Peaceful
-1 or 0Neutral
1 to 3Hostile
4 or moreMortal Foe
 
 
Detailed Monster Reactions C: Result
source or inspiration: Roger the GS
 
Lastly, the GM should cross-reference the two results above to get the monsters' behaviour. Results are as follows:
Attack:Monsters advance and attack the party
Stand:Monsters hold ground, fight if attacked
Retreat:Monsters make orderly withdrawal
Flee:Monsters run away headlong
Results in inverted commas only apply if the party and monsters can communicate:
'Offer Service':Monsters offer to help the party or fight with them a short while
'Offer Peace':Monsters offer a longer-term truce
'Offer Alliance':Monsters propose an alliance to achieve a mutual goal
'Ask for Service':Monsters demand the party assist them, will turn neutral if refused
'Ask for Peace':Monsters demand a truce and will impose other conditions
'Beg':Monsters grovel and will offer all they have to escape attack
'Bargain':Monsters parley, but will pay a high price to escape attack
'Parley':Monsters negotiate a mutually acceptable truce
'Intimidate':Monsters negotiate but will expect payment or other advantage
'Command':Monsters demand a payment, bribe, or other service in exchange for truce
Results in square brackets only apply if the monsters are attacked, and can't escape:
[Surrender]:Monsters throw down arms and beg for mercy
[Berserk]:Monsters fight without mercy in a last-ditch stand
[Fight]:Monsters fight, subject to morale checks
Results in plus signs only apply if the party flees or retreats:
+Stay+:Monsters do not chase
+Pursue+:Monsters give chase
+No Quarter+:Monsters will not accept party surrender, fighting to the death
 
.
Morale result
Hostility ResultOvercomeImpressedWaryConfidentBold
FriendlyStand
'Offer Service'
Stand
'Offer Service'
Stand
'Offer Alliance'
Stand
'Offer Alliance'
Stand
'Ask for Service'
PeacefulRetreat
['Offer Peace']
Stand
'Offer Peace'
Stand
'Offer Peace'
Stand
'Offer Peace'
Stand
'Ask for Peace'
NeutralRetreat
['Beg']
Stand
'Bargain'
Stand
'Parley'
Stand
'Intimidate'
Stand
'Command'
HostileFlee
[Surrender]
Retreat
[Fight]
Attack
+Stay+
Attack
+Stay+
Attack
+Pursue+
Mortal FoeFlee
[Berserk]
Retreat
[Fight]
Attack
+Stay+
Attack
+Pursue+
Attack
+Pursue, No Quarter+
 
 
Why This Place Fell Into Ruin
source or inspiration: Central Casting: Dungeons
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Inhabitants killed by a plague.
13-4The inhabitants were cursed, through no fault of their own.
15-6The inhabitants were cursed, due to their own wickedness.
21-2Monsters killed everyone, and still inhabit the place.
23-4Monsters killed everyone, and left the place in ruins.
25-6The (roll again: 1-3 water 4-6 air) was poisoned. Roll again: on a 1-3 the poison is still present.
31-2The inhabitants were involved in a war. When their army never returned, the place was abandoned.
33-4The economy that the place depended on collapsed.
35-6The surrounding environment degraded, due to the inhabitants' actions (for example, all the trees were cut down), so that the place was no longer viable.
41-2The surrounding environment degraded, through no fault of the inhabitants (for example, an ice age or prolonged drought), so that the place was no longer viable.
43-4The inhabitants lost their technology, and large cities no longer made sense.
45-6The place was built for defence. When the threat was no longer present, there was no reason to maintain the place.
51-2The place was destroyed in a disaster: Roll again: 1 fire 2 flood 3 volcanic eruption 4 earthquake 5 meteor strike 6 tornado or hurricane.
53-4As above, but the disaster was caused by a magical experiment gone wrong.
55-6The inhabitants seem to have disappeared in an instant.
61-2The advanced inhabitants went to another planet.
63-4The advanced inhabitants became creatures of pure energy. Roll again: on a 1-3 they still inhabit the place.
65-6The place was never inhabited: it is a life-size model.
 
 
Unusual Characteristics of Villains
source or inspiration: Renegade Crowns (Warhammer Fantasy)
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
1-21-21-2Commits virtuous acts in secret.
1-21-23-4Took the blame for the crime of a relative and went into exile.
1-21-25-6Is secretly related to a prominent family.
1-23-41-2Worships demons.
1-23-43-4Secretly responsible for a vile atrocity (even by the standards of ordinary villains).
1-23-45-6Secretly working for a more powerful and respectable government.
1-25-61-2Secretly dresses in the clothes of a child.
1-25-63-4As above, and sings popular songs from the theatre.
1-25-65-6Obsessed with breeding ever-smaller dogs.
3-41-21-2Has a collection of stuffed toys made to look like their enemies.
3-41-23-4Is a famous criminal under another name.
3-41-25-6Flies into a rage if s/he sees red clothing.
3-43-41-2Flies into a rage if s/he sees ivory buttons.
3-43-43-4Flies into a rage whenever an odd number of plates are set at dinner.
3-43-45-6Expects everyone to keep silent for least a minute after s/he speaks, in case s/he hasn't finished.
3-45-61-2Has a catchphrase, which they use too often and inappropriately.
3-45-63-4Compelled to wash hands with wine after touching another's flesh.
3-45-65-6Has a special seat for their weapon, and will never sit comfortablely unless the weapon is also 'seated'.
5-61-21-2Can only speak to people in alphabetical order.
5-61-23-4Believes in an imaginary race of cockroach people who are conquering other lands.
5-61-25-6Writes a letter 'home' to an imagined family every week.
5-63-41-2Never lies to a lady.
5-63-43-4Pays a token amount for everything they steal.
5-63-45-6Afraid of watering cans.
5-65-61-2Afraid of women in low-cut dresses.
5-65-63-4Afraid of birds with blue feathers.
5-65-65-6Obsessed with a particular kind of cake.
 
 
Campaign Ideas From Cartoons
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll twice, re-rolling duplicate results. The first result gives the heroes of the campaign, the second gives the villains. Optionally roll again to get the setting.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11The Smurfs.
12Gargamel (the Smurfs).
13GI Joe.
14Cobra (GI Joe).
15Scooby Doo.
16Transformers.
21The Flintstones.
22The Jetsons.
23He-Man / Masters of the Universe.
24Skeletor (Masters of the Universe).
25Josie and the Pussycats.
26Thundercats.
31Mumm-Ra (Thundercats).
32Mutants (Thundercats).
33Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.
34Star Trek.
35G-Force (Battle of the Planets / G-Force / Gatchaman).
36Spectra/Galactor (Battle of the Planets / G-Force / Gatchaman).
41Astro Boy.
42Danger Mouse.
43Baron Greenback (Danger Mouse).
44Inspector Gadget.
45Doctor Claw (Inspector Gadget).
46Muppet Babies.
51Care Bears.
52Ghostbusters.
53Babar.
54The Archies.
55Pokemon.
56Kimba the White Lion.
61Star Blazers.
62Gamilons (Star Blazers).
63The Comet Empire (Star Blazers).
64Justice League (Super Friends).
65Legion of Doom (Super Friends).
66Robotech.
 
 
Paralysing Monsters
source or inspiration: Eric Minton
 
This table is used to decide the tactics of creatures who disable their opponents without killing them: for example by sending them to sleep, paralysis, throwing a net etc.

It can be used for unintelligent or intelligent creatures, including humans. The less intelligent a creature is, the more likely it will do the same thing each time. For intelligent creatures, the GM should subtract from the roll if the creatures are outnumbered or losing the battle, and add to it if they're more numerous or winning. Some results will be inappropriate for some types of creatures and should be re-rolled.
 
Roll 1 dice.
roll, modified if appropriate
Less than 1Flee for safety, hoping their opponents will tend to their disabled comrades instead of pursuing.
1Flee in hopes of luring their opponents after them (possibly into a trap), then double back to seize their disabled opponents.
2Kill the disabled opponents.
3 or 4Whenever an opponent is paralyzed, pick them up and carry them off.
5 or 6Ignore disabled opponents while there are other opponents left standing.
more than 6Unless directly engaged in combat, kill disabled opponents, and spend the rest of the combat eating them.
 
 
What's At the End of the Rainbow
source or inspiration: Norman Harman
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2A pleasant land, which the heroes heard of once in a lullaby.
1-23-4The rainbow is a bridge, which leads to the Moon.
1-25-6The rainbow is a bridge to Valhalla (the Viking heaven), guarded by the god Heimdall. He will not let the heroes pass unless they complete an appropriate quest.
3-41-2As above, but 'Heimdall' is really the trickster-god Loki, and his quest will seem to be noble but will cause evil.
3-43-4A pot of gold.
3-45-6As above, but the pot is a trap, laid by a group of vicious leprechauns who wait in ambush (that's how they get their gold).
5-61-2A huge rainbow cake.
5-63-4A wizard, Roy G. Biv.
5-65-6The rainbow is a gigantic serpent (not necessarily hostile).
 
 
Unusual Treasure Containers
source or inspiration: Telecanter (Creative Commons license)
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Submersed in a barrel of brine.
12In a dimensional pocket visibile from only one direction.
13As parcels, each piece, including coins, individually wrapped in silk.
14Sewn inside (roll again: 1-3 a limbless, headless, mummified torso 4-6 a bag made from the whole hide of a humanoid).
15Suspended in the air from long bamboo poles, each individual piece on a seperate pole.
16Completely encased by an insect hive.
21In a tapered coffer carved from a giant tusk.
22Completely encased in mineral deposits.
23Completely encased in amber.
24In a Japanese style puzzle box.
25Enclosed in a bag woven from hair.
26Inside the hollow brass figure of a common animal.
31Inside a carved, giant nut.
32Completely encased in tar.
33Fashioned into a moving automaton.
34Arranged on the floor as a treasure map.
35Arranged on the floor encoding a rare spell.
36In a coffer fashioned from platemail welded together by lightning.
41Bricked up in a small shrine.
42Sealed inside clay spheres.
43Fashioned into windchimes.
44Rolled up in a musty carpet.
45Stacked precariously around a deep hole.
46Roll again: 1-3 sealed in sheets of crimped lead 4-6 bound together in a clump with platinum wire.
51Encased in a cube of wax.
52Arrayed on the petrified statues of the original owners.
53Sealed in a clear glass sphere.
54In a cage constructed of bones.
55Hidden in wooden dolls arranged in dioramas.
56In a continuously writhing clump of worms.
61Levitating.
62Strapped to the backs of several monkeys trained to evade.
63In a coffer carved from a giant oak burl.
64In the chitinous husk of a giant insect.
65Floating on crystal rafts in a pool of acid.
66In an open fire (roll again if the treasure includes anything flammable).
 
 
Hazardous Dungeon Environments
source or inspiration: The Dungeon-Crawl
 
For all results marked with an asterisk (*), it is impossible for the heroes to rest in the area.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2* Cursed: The area saps away a person's resolve, making it harder to push on. Encounters with undead creatures are more likely.
13-4* Eerie: There are no apparent problems with the area, but somehow the characters get no rest here.
15-6Filthy: Staying in the area could cause disease.
21-2Wind: Torches could be blown out (lanterns won't be).
23-4* Strong Wind: As above, and travelling against the wind will be more tiring.
25-6* Very Strong Wind: As above, and the heroes might be blown over, and equipment might be ripped from their hands.
31-2* Flooded: Movement through the area will be slow. In addition, if the heroes then move to a cold areas, the effects of cold will be worse.
33-4Cramped: The heroes might have to crawl, or be unable to proceed at all. The heroes are unlikely to encounter large creatures here.
35-6Fog: Ambushes will be more likely, and the heroes are more likely to get separated and/or mistake their direction.
41-2* Smoke: As above, and the heroes will be damaged by staying in the area.
43-4* Magical Smoke: As above, but the heroes will suffer an effect other than damage from staying in the area. Roll on the 'Gas Clouds' table below, re-rolling a result of 'Poison'.
45-6Magical Darkness: Light sources will be less effective, or not work at all. Roll again: on a 1-3, magical light is immune.
51-2Magical Silence: Ambushes are more likely, and spells might not work.
53-4Magical Vortex: Spells cast here are likely to (roll again: 1-3 not work 4-6 have the wrong effect).
55-6Twist in Space: The heroes are likely to mistake their direction.
61-2Popular: Monsters are more common here than usual.
63-4Roll on the 'Climate' table below. Re-roll results of 'Mild'.
65-6Roll twice on this table, ignoring and re-rolling this result.
 
 
Mount Reactions
source or inspiration: Aeons & Augauries
 
This table is designed for when a mount is faced with combat, or a situation such as a snake, fire, monsters etc. The GM should apply modifiers based on the quality of the mount (for example mules and warhorses might get a minus, normal horses a plus). Results of less than 2 count as 2, and results of more than 12 count as 12.
 
Roll 2 dice, use the total.
2Throws Rider The mount tries to buck the rider off, rider could get stomped and then horse flees..
3Bolts The horse breaks away/flees.
4as above.
5Stop The beast refuses to go further. It will take 1-6 minutes to get it to cooperate. It will bolt (see above) if the danger comes close.
6Whinnies The mount snorts, paws at the ground, whips its tail etc. This will give away the rider's position. Roll again, applying a -2 penalty, if the noise or apparent danger increases, or if the mount isn't out of danger in one minute of game time.
7Stumbles The mount will attempt to avoid the danger but will continue on the path. Roll again, applying a -2 penalty, if the noise or apparent danger increases.
8as above.
9Carries On.
10as above.
11as above.
12as above.
 
 
Dragon's Breath
source or inspiration: Basic and 1st edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons
 
For every result other than bolts of lightning, the GM might roll for the shape of the weapon: 1-2 straight line; only one target at a time 3-4 cone; one or more targets at a time 5-6 cloud; potentially every opponent can be hit.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Corrosive acid or venom. If the target is wearing armour, it will dissolve the armour before it does any damage to the target. It might also dissolve weapons, shields and other equipment.
2Fire. Targets have a chance of being set on fire if hit, as well as the initial damage. Metal armour will reduce this chance considerably, but wooden weapons and shields are highly likely to burn.
3Poison gas. Armour and shields are of no use against this attack.
4Gas. Roll on the 'Gas Clouds' table in the 'Dungeons & Combat' section (although the breath might not come out in a cloud). Armour and shields are of no use against this attack.
5A bolt of lightning. The bolt will more often hit a target wearing metal armour, even if the dragon intended to hit someone else. This will 'earth' the lightning, but may do damage to the wearer. If the bolt is aimed at someone who has a metal weapon or a shield, the bolt is likely to hit the weapon or shield. The target will be forced to drop a metal weapon hit in this way, and those who wear shields will find their arms numbed and temporarily useless.
6Choose a random spell from your campaign. Choose only from those spells which harm the target.
 
 
Book Titles
source or inspiration: Al Krombach
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
111-2Offerings to Set: A Diary.
113-4Cocktail Recipes of the Crimson Court.
115-6The Prayers of Arumfus.
121-2Black Nights and Red Blood: A History of Lost Harnfell.
123-4The Rise and Fall of the Dread Emperor.
125-6Limericks for an Elven Fete.
131-2Cistikin's Foul Grimoire.
133-4The Last Titan.
135-6The Teachings of the Great Nordoolus.
141-2Bezum's Book of Marine Engineering.
143-4One Bridge Too Many: Last Stand of the Excitran Cavalry.
145-6The Poetry of Fars Fargrim.
151-2A Dwarf In Shackles: Overcoming the Curse.
153-4Troll Recipes for Fanciful Children.
155-6Anatomy of the Centaur.
161-2Tira and the Roper: A Tale of Forbidden Love.
163-4Nineteen Filthy Leprechauns.
165-6Maps and Floorplans of Porttown.
211-2The Memoirs of Grewg the Pirate.
213-4Bleak Happenings: A history of the Mindplague.
215-6Drinks to liven your Existence.
221-2Popular Dress and Hairstyles of the Second Age.
223-4Aradombular: Three Plays.
225-6Aradombular: A Treatise of the Meaning of Things.
231-2Aradombular: The Philosophy of Gromus.
233-4Aradombular: The Pagan Essays.
235-6The Battle of Orichs and the Fall of Trayle.
241-2The Twelve Sagas of Bronn the Hero.
243-4Ornamental Dogs and their uses in Modern Cuisine.
245-6My Five Humans: An Ogre's Tale.
251-2Dragons: Myth or Fact?.
253-4The Encyclopedia Geraximus: Volume Thirty Four Ch-Cz.
255-6Balls.
261-2Military Ensignia of the Knights Emergent.
263-4Juiblex: The Lost Comedies.
265-6Ode to the Hobgoblin Maiden.
311-2Fifteen Holy Relics of Ylalla.
313-4Pyromancy: An Urban Crisis.
315-6Fuanatic Poisons and Their Cures.
321-2Klybec's Passion.
323-4Otyugh and I.
325-6Letters to the Major: A Bordercaptain's Shame.
331-2The Lost Shrine of Amberdown: Found?.
333-4Hyrax: A Play in Seven Acts.
335-6Tools of the Late Jurian Age.
341-2Bridges: The Secrets of their lasting Construction and Maintenence.
343-4An argument against Necromancy.
345-6The Seventy-seven Quips of Borlak the Arch-Mage.
351-2Thirty Leagues Below Mount Grimbad.
353-4Shields and Bucklers of the Late Devalian Rennaisance.
355-6The Chemistries of Niflif the Clever.
361-2The Cat-Gods of Olix.
363-4Koepple: Ninety-nine Songs of Hate and Derision.
365-6One Hundred Songs of Hate and Derision: A Response to Koepple.
411-2A Brief History of the Orange Uprising.
413-4Desert Survival, A Beginner's Guide.
415-6The Mysteries of Dionicus.
421-2The Care and Feeding of the Xorn.
423-4Small Things and Gnomes.
425-6Deciphering the Language of Kobolds.
431-2The Humorous Letters of Mayor Barrelroom.
433-4Nine Sages in Hell: A Warning.
435-6The Flora and Fungi of the Grey Forest.
441-2The Thirty-Seven Useful Parts of the Catoblepas.
443-4The Unmasking and Trying of Witches!
445-6Fifteen Fowl Recipes.
451-2Siege Engines and their Construction and Use.
453-4Engineering Secrets of the Elder Kings.
455-6The Sins of Father Trinicus.
461-2The Prophesies of the Jilgrian Sisterhood.
463-4Small Wonder: Rise and Fall of the Halfling King.
465-6Herbology: An Apprentice's Handbook.
511-2A Pictoral Guide to the birds of the Mossy Vale.
513-4The Secrets of Seduction for the Clueless and Childless.
515-6Naughty Gifts, the Memoires of Lady Truncheon.
521-2Autumn Leaves: The Diary of Woqueforte the Unloved.
523-4Poetry of the Lobingian Epoch.
525-6Seven Simple Love Charms and Potions.
531-2Fishing Lures for every Season.
533-4Preventing Pox.
535-6Disciplining the Wayward Child.
541-2Puddings and Oozes of the Sunless Realm.
543-4Undeath: A Treatise.
545-6The Saga of Eligarth the Bold.
551-2Flumph Recipes.
553-4A History of the Pale City.
555-6Sewage and Irrigation of the Modern Jail.
561-2Courtly Manners of the Appropriate Kinde.
563-4Feces: A Hunter's Guide.
565-6The Travels and Travails of Willus and Feng.
611-2The Browne Arcanum.
613-4The Legend of the Diamond.
615-6Throne Secrets of the Prax Society.
621-2Brewing like the Masters!
623-4The Lost Erotica of the Orcs.
625-6Tales of the Far South.
631-2Twelve Habits of the Successful General.
633-4Misery Loves Company: The Care and Spreading of the Latest Plague.
635-6The Polite Prayerbook of the Penitant Pilgrim.
641-2Haques' Dictionary (2600 pages).
643-4Debauchery and the Church: A Guide to Combining The Two.
645-6Filing & Photocopying: Role-Playing in a World of High Technology.
651-2Throne of the Golem Prince.
653-4The Ages of Kingdoms, Compared to Those of A Man.
655-6Atlas of the Astral Realms.
661-2The Accursed Book of Yon.
663-4Chants and Prayers to Placate the Sea.
665-6Wise Pronouncements of the Owls of Yib.
 
 
Priests
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table provides alternatives to the traditional 'cleric' class.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1There are adventuring priests, who may or may not have magical abilities.
2There are adventuring priests, but they never have magic powers. No temple with have anything to do with magic.
3There are adventuring holy men and women with magic powers, but they aren't priests. Officials of a church will always be non-player characters.
4There are priests with magic powers, but they never adventure. Player characters can go to them for healing, blessing etc, but they won't be player-characters themselves.
5All magic powers come from a god or goddess. There are no wizards other than priests (roll again 1-3 player characters may be priests 4-6 player characters can't be priests).
6People believe that priests have magic powers, but they are a combination of scientific knowledge, and the psychological effect of people's belief in the priests' powers. Optionally roll again: 1-3 priests believe they have magical abilities 4-6 priests know that they're tricking people.
 
 
Near-Death Experiences
source or inspiration: Mike Hensley
 
When a character comes close to death, and recovers, the GM might declare a chance that they should roll on this table. The chance should be higher if they're cured by magic than if they recover naturally.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2The character has a disease. Optionally, roll 2-4 times on the 'Disease 2: Symptoms' table in the 'Wilderness and Worlds' section.
13-4As above, but the character has no symptoms of the disease. Instead, they infect others with it.
15-6An evil supernatural creature such as a demon or ghost is brought into the world. They are unable to directly harm the character, but will work for their death. Roll again for the creature's appearance: 1-2 the creature looks and speaks exactly like the character 3-4 the creature seems to be a normal member of the character's species 5-6 the creature is obviously supernatural.
21-2A close relative or friend of the character dies.
23-4The character's recovery drains the life-force of someone nearby.
25-6The character is disfigured.
31-2The character gains occult knowledge, which however drives them close to madness, and gives them a frighteningly unearthly appearance.
33-4The character appears cured, but starts to waste away from an unknown cause. If left untreated, rather than die, they will become an undead creature such as a zombie or vampire. This affliction can only be cured magically.
35-6The character is uncannilly lucky for the next month.
41-2The character gains wisdom and an air of holiness.
43-4The character becomes uncannily brave for the next year.
45-6The character is given a glimpse of the future.
51-2The character is severely weakened for the next month.
53-4The character is actually dead, and their body is inhabited by an evil supernatural creature.
55-6Roll on the 'Effects of Powerful Magic on the Caster' table in the 'Magic' section.
61-2As above, but roll twice.
63-4As above, but roll three times.
65-6Roll twice on this table, ignoring and re-rolling this result.
 
 
Requests Through Prayer
source or inspiration: James Jarvis
 
Count results less than 3 as 3, and those of more than 18 as 18.

Depending on the game world any character might be able to make a request by prayer, or only priests. There might also be a limit to how often a character can make a request. For example, once every 24 hours. Or, each extra attempt in a particular period of time might attract a penalty.

Examples of modifications to the roll could be:

-1 for each week the character has been lax in their devotions (for example missing church)

+2 if the attempt is made at a temple dedicated to the deity (or at a place associated with the deity; for example, some might be associated with crossroads, or running streams)
+2 if the character has a relic of the deity.

-1 to +2 based on the Charisma, Willpower or similar attribute of the character.

+1 to 6 if the character has made an appropriate donation, sacrifice, penance (as appropriate to the deity).
 
Roll 3 dice, use the total.
3Atonement Required: The request is refused. Roll 3 dice. The character must spend this many days in prayer, fasting, and contemplation, or other form of continuous worship as appropriate to the deity, before they can make any request again.
4Atonement Required (as above).
5Stern Refusal: The request is refused. For any future requests, the character should take 2 from the roll, until they get a result of 'granted' or 'atonement required'. Multiple 'stern refusals' add together. For example two stern refusals will give a -4 penalty. The character can choose to atone, as if they'd gotten a result of 'Atonement Required', to get rid of any penalty from this result.
6Stern Refusal (as above).
7Stern Refusal (as above).
8Refusal.
9Refusal.
10Refusal.
11Refusal.
12Refusal.
13Granted.
14Granted.
15Granted.
16Granted.
17Granted.
18Granted.
 
 
Undead Reaction Table
source or inspiration: James Jarvis
 
Count results of less than 2 as 2, and those of more than 12 as 12.
 
Roll 2 dice, use the total.
2The undead seem oddly distracted by something else and don't pay you any attention. Roll again in five minutes of game time, or if the players move closer, make noise etc.
3The undead seem confused by the stimulus of fresh meat. In one minute of game time, roll again, but take 2 from the total.
4as above.
5The undead are surprised by the walking talking meat before them, they stand there salivating. Roll again in 1 minute of game time.
6as above.
7The undead are thrilled to see the PCs. They howl, scream, moan, groan or murmur 'brains' as appropriate to draw more of their ilk to the oncoming feast. In one minute of game time, roll again, adding 3 to the total. More undead are likely to turn up by this time.
8The undead stumble onward ready to attack.
9as above.
10The hungry dead leap forth ready to bite, gnash and tear.
11as above.
12as above.
 
 
Distinguishing Features
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
The likelihood of rolling on this table will depend on how old the person is, and how much trouble they've been in in their life. A retired adventurer might have more than one feature.

Where relevant, roll for the side: 1-3 left 4-6 right.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2Missing an ear.
1-23-4Missing a hand (roll again: 1-2 wooden hand 3-4 hook 5-6 nothing).
1-25-6Missing an arm (roll again: 1-2 wooden arm 3-4 wooden arm ending in a hook 5-6 nothing).
3-41-2Missing a leg (roll again 1-2 wooden leg 3 peg leg 5 crutches 6 nothing).
3-43-4Missing an eye (roll again: 1-2 eyepatch 3-4 glass eye 5-6 nothing).
3-45-6Long scar on face.
5-61-2Face is a mass of scars.
5-63-4No teeth (roll again: 1-2 wooden teeth 3-4 artificial teeth; roll on the 'Precious and Semi-Precious Stones' table in the in the 'Treasure' section for what they're made of, ignoring the column headed 'value' 5-6 nothing).
5-65-6Skin is (roll again: 1-2 deathly white 3-4 reddened 5-6 blackened) due to (roll again: 1-3 disease 4-6 magic).
 
 
Does It Burn?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table can be used for strange or magical materials.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2Burning actually makes it bigger.
1-23-4Doesn't burn.
1-25-6as above.
3-41-2Burns away in 1-3 minutes, and gives off a strange smoke. Roll on the 'Gas Clouds' table below.
3-43-4as above.
3-45-6Explodes. The object is instantly destroyed, but anyone close is hurt.
5-61-2Burns away in 1-3 hours.
5-63-4Burns away in a 1-3 minutes.
5-65-6Burns away in an instant.
 
 
Time Spent In A Dungeon
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table gives the amount of time that's passed in the outside world while the player characters were in a dungeon.
It's designed for more 'magical' rather than 'realistic' dungeons.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1The players leave the dungeon a few hours before they enter. If they realise and decide to wait for themselves, roll again (in all cases their past selves will be run by the GM):
1-2 Their past selves can't see or touch them, and enter the dungeon.
3 Their past selves see them as dim shadows, like ghosts. If the past characters are frightened off, the player-characters are 'reset' to how they were before they entered the dungeon - they lose any treasure and benefits of experience for example. Dead characters have a 50% chance of coming back to life. The dungeon itself is still effected by the characters (any creature they killed is still dead for example) and the player-characters don't lose their memory of having been in the dungeon.
4 Their past selves see them as monsters. If the past characters are frightened off, refer to the result above. If a fight results and a past character dies, the corresponding present character also dies.
5 Their past selves see them, and might be convinced not to enter the dungeon, with results as discussed above.
6 As for 5, but if a character touches its past self an explosion will result, killing both.
2Only a few seconds have passed.
3Time has passed normally. However the players have exited in an alternative universe. Roll again:
1-2 Good people in the player-characters' universe are evil here and vice-versa
3-4 The universe is based on another genre, for example science-fiction or horror.
5-6 The universe is populated by a different species, or set of species, to the player-characters' universe. For example if the player-characters are humans, elves and dwarves, the alternative universe might be populated by intelligent insects.
In all cases, the new universe will have equivalent countries and invidividuals to the player-characters' universe, including equivalents to the player-characters themselves. If the player-characters go back in the dungeon and wait a while before coming back out, roll again on this table. They're back in their own universe unless this result is rolled again.
4Roll three dice and take the total. That many weeks have passed.
5Roll two dice and take the total. That many months have passed.
6A year has passed for every level the characters got to. For example, if the characters reached three levels below the ground level, four years have passed.
 
 
Fantasy Titles: Structure
source or inspiration: Andrew Byers. From the Carcosan Grimoire
 
These tables generate titles that can be used for a monarch, high priest, or similar figure (or for a character who would like to be thought of as such).

Where the result says (A), roll on 'Fantasy Titles A' below, and so on for other bold letters.
Note that some results in Table C will tell you to roll on Table A again. Always roll separately for the two (A)s if this happens.

Optional: If the result includes (C), roll again: on a 5, replace the (C) with 'of the (A) (B)'. On a 6, replace it with 'of the (B)'.
Again, if there are two (A)s or two (B)s, roll separately for the two.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1-2(A) (B).
3-4(A) (B) (C).
5-6(B) (C).
 
 
Fantasy Titles A
source or inspiration: Andrew Byers. From the Carcosan Grimoire
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
111-2Ancient.
113-4Ascendant.
115-6August.
121-2Beauteous.
123-4Beautiful.
125-6Beneficent.
131-2Blooming.
133-4Blossoming.
135-6Bountiful.
141-2Bright.
143-4Brightest.
145-6Brilliant.
151-2Celestial.
153-4Clear.
155-6Constant.
161-2Coruscating.
163-4Crystalline.
165-6Cunning.
211-2Day's.
213-4Deep.
215-6Delicate.
221-2Desirous.
223-4Divine.
225-6Dominant.
231-2Eloquent.
233-4Eternal.
235-6Ever-Full.
241-2Exalted.
243-4Falling.
245-6Fertile.
251-2Final.
253-4Flowering.
255-6Foremost.
261-2Gentle.
263-4Gibbering.
265-6Glittering.
311-2Glorious.
313-4Gracious.
315-6Grand.
321-2Heart's.
323-4High.
325-6Humble.
331-2Illustrious.
333-4Imperious.
335-6Implacable.
341-2Inapproachable.
343-4Incomparable.
345-6Indulgent.
351-2Inestimable.
353-4Inexorable.
355-6Invincible.
361-2Iridescent.
363-4Lustrous.
365-6Magisterial.
411-2Magnificent.
413-4Manifest.
415-6Many-Angled.
421-2Masterful.
423-4Meek.
425-6Merciful.
431-2Mighty.
433-4Most (and roll again on this table, ignoring and re-rolling if you get this result again, or the result 'Night's').
435-6Mystic.
441-2Night's.
443-4Omnipotent.
445-6Omnipresent.
451-2Omniscient.
453-4One True.
455-6Overflowing.
461-2Pale.
463-4Paramount.
465-6Peerless.
511-2Perpetual.
513-4Piercing.
515-6Predominant.
521-2Purest.
523-4Raucous.
525-6Redoubtable.
531-2Refulgent.
533-4Regnant.
535-6Resplendent.
541-2Righteous.
543-4Royal.
545-6Sagacious.
551-2Screaming.
553-4Serene.
555-6Shimmering.
561-2Shining.
563-4Silent.
565-6Sovereign.
611-2Splendorous.
613-4Stainless.
615-6Stern.
621-2Sublime.
623-4Superior.
625-6Supreme.
631-2Swift.
633-4Total.
635-6Tranquil.
641-2Transcendent.
643-4Triumphant.
645-6Unanswerable.
651-2Unapproachable.
653-4Unbearable.
655-6Utter.
661-2Uttermost.
663-4Wise.
665-6roll on the 'Precious and Semi-Precious Stones' table, in the 'Treasure' section. Ignore the column headed 'value'.
 
 
Fantasy Titles B
source or inspiration: Andrew Byers. From the Carcosan Grimoire
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
111-2Adept.
113-4Advocate.
115-6Apotheosis.
121-2Arbiter.
123-4Attendant.
125-6Autocrat.
131-2Autocrator.
133-4Bestower.
135-6Brightness.
141-2Captain.
143-4Chief.
145-6Chieftain.
151-2Commander.
153-4Crown.
155-6Death.
161-2Dew.
163-4Diadem.
165-6Dominance.
211-2Dominator.
213-4Dominion.
215-6Elegance.
221-2Excellency.
223-4Eyes.
225-6Father/Mother.
231-2Flower.
233-4Foundation.
235-6Fountain.
241-2Fullness.
243-4Gem.
245-6Gemstone.
251-2Glory.
253-4Grace.
255-6Guardian.
261-2Heart.
263-4Illumination.
265-6Illustriousness.
311-2Infinitude.
313-4Intellect.
315-6Jewel.
321-2Joy.
323-4Joy-Giver.
325-6Judge.
331-2Lawgiver.
333-4Life.
335-6Light.
341-2Listener.
343-4Lord/Lady.
345-6Lover.
351-2Master/Mistress.
353-4Mind.
355-6Mirror.
361-2Night.
363-4Obliteration.
365-6Ocean.
411-2One.
413-4Overlord.
415-6Overseer.
421-2Pearl.
423-4Perfection.
425-6Pharaoh.
431-2Plenipotentiary.
433-4Plumage.
435-6Poignancy.
441-2Pool.
443-4Power.
445-6Preceptor.
451-2Preponderancy.
453-4Presence.
455-6Protector.
461-2Provider.
463-4Puissance.
465-6Radiance.
511-2Rain.
513-4Ravager.
515-6Ravishment.
521-2Reflection.
523-4Regent.
525-6Servant.
531-2Shield.
533-4Soul.
535-6Sovereign.
541-2Speaker.
543-4Spring.
545-6Star.
551-2Sun.
553-4Superior.
555-6Thought.
561-2Totalitor.
563-4Tower.
565-6Tyrant.
611-2Vault.
613-4Victory.
615-6Voice.
621-2Wellspring.
623-4Wielder.
625-6Will.
631-2Wind.
633-4Worm.
635-6roll on the 'Titles of a Magician' table, in the 'Magic and Religion' and 'Personalising Characters' sections.
641-2as above.
643-4as above.
645-6roll on the 'Titles of an Aristocratic Ruler' table, in the 'Settlements and Countries' section. Ignore the column headed 'Title of Territory'.
651-2as above.
653-4as above.
655-6roll on the 'Titles of a High-Ranking Priest' table, in the 'Magic and Religion' and 'Settlements and Countries' sections.
661-2as above.
663-4roll on the 'Evil Magical Creatures - Titles 1' table, in the 'Magic and Religion' and 'Creating Creatures' sections. If you get the result 'Destroyer', ignore the instruction to roll on the other table.
665-6as above.
 
 
Fantasy Titles C
source or inspiration: Andrew Byers. From the Carcosan Grimoire
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
11-21-2Beyond all Superlatives.
11-23-4by Whom All See.
11-25-6of (A) Countenance.
13-41-2of All.
13-43-4of All Excellences.
13-45-6of All Gifts.
15-61-2of All Graces.
15-63-4of All Lands.
15-65-6of All Truths.
21-21-2of Benedictions.
21-23-4of Dreams.
21-25-6of Glory.
23-41-2of Heaven.
23-43-4of Humility.
23-45-6of Invincibility.
25-61-2of Kings.
25-63-4of Many Colours.
25-65-6of Mercy.
31-21-2of Peace.
31-23-4of Radiance.
31-25-6of Sleepers.
33-41-2of Small Petals.
33-43-4of Splendour.
33-45-6of Spring.
35-61-2of Stones.
35-63-4of Sublime Wisdom.
35-65-6of Summer.
41-21-2of the (A) God.
41-23-4of the (A) Scepter.
41-25-6of the Air.
43-41-2of the Air, the Earth, and the Seas.
43-43-4of the Bringer.
43-45-6of the Dead.
45-61-2of the Earth.
45-63-4of the Eyes.
45-65-6of the Floods.
51-21-2of the Frozen Lightning.
51-23-4of the Gatherer.
51-25-6of the Hills.
53-41-2of the Master.
53-43-4of the Moon.
53-45-6of the Morning.
55-61-2of the Seas.
55-63-4of the Stars.
55-65-6of the Sun.
61-21-2of the True People.
61-23-4of the Waves.
61-25-6of Those Who Watch.
63-41-2of War.
63-43-4of Winds.
63-45-6of Winter.
65-61-2of Wishes.
65-63-4That Sees In the Dark.
65-65-6Upon the (A) Throne.
 
 
Rations in Dungeons
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table gives the fate of rations in the dank air of dungeons. A party should roll once day.
This table applies to normal rations. Some games might have 'iron rations' (dried and salted food designed specifically to keep for long periods) which are immune.
Likewise, some food might be holy or magical, requiring less frequent rolls or none at all.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1No effect.
2No effect.
3Half the party's rations (round up if necessary) are eaten by small animals, unless they're hung out of reach of the floor and walls (for example if there's a tree in the dungeon they can be hung there).
4One meal's worth of rations spoils.
5Half the party's rations (round down if necessary) spoil.
6All rations spoil.
 
 
Spellbooks and Equivalents
source or inspiration: Max Davenport
 
This table generates the object that a magician uses to store their spells
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2A book. To the uninitiated, the spells will appear to be recipes.
13-4A book. To the uninitiated, the spells will appear to be poetry.
15-6A book. To the uninitiated, the spells will appear to be meaningless sentences.
21-2A book. To the uninitiated, the spells will appear to be drawings.
23-4A book. To the uninitiated, the spells will appear to be maps.
25-6A book. To the uninitiated, the spells will appear to be written in an unknown language.
31-2A book. The spells aren't in any kind of code, but the book is alive and will defend itself fiercely.
33-4A staff whose carvings give the details of spells.
35-6The magician's hair (possibly including their mustache and/or beard) is knotted in a way which represents the spells (roll again if the magician is bald and has no beard or mustache). The hair will become less knotted as their magical energy is used.
41-2A talking mirror.
43-4A talking mask, which looks like the magician's own face.
45-6A large shell. The magician whispers spells into the shell, and puts it to their ear to hear them.
51-2A box of pills, which the magician needs to take to cast a spell.
53-4A pouch of magical tobacco. The smoke curls in such a way as to remind the magician how to cast the spells.
55-6A shortwave radio. When tuned to a secret frequency, an announcer can be heard reading the magical formulas.
61-2A star chart, giving the location of the (roll again 1-2 gods 3-4 demons 5-6 aliens) who send the magician their spells.
63-4The magician is subscribed to a newspaper whose articles give spell formulas in code.
65-6A chess board (or go, checkers, backgammon, or a similar game in your game world). Certain positions of the pieces correspond to particular spells.
 
 
Mounts: Land
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
If you get more than one 'start again, ignoring this result', the mount has all the extra characteristics shown.

If you get 'the most common mount in the area', and that's a horse, optionally you can roll on the Horse Colour table below.
 
Roll 1 dice, then keep rolling if required.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-4no need to roll againWhatever is the most common mount in the area: camels if in the desert, giant lizards if underground, a sled pulled by dogs in the snow, horses in most other places.
51a coach, pulled by whatever is the most common mount in the area.
52a chariot, pulled by whatever is the most common mount in the area.
53a baby elephant.
54a giant turtle or tortoise.
55an animated suit of armour who carries the rider piggy-back.
56a palanquin or rickshaw, pulled or carried by animated skeletons.
61a centaur (optionally, roll on the 'Hindquarters of a Centaur' table below).
62a giant scarab beetle, whose carapace is (roll again): 1 battered as if it had been in many battles, 2 painted in the colours of its owner, 3 covered in armour, 4 covered in furs, 5 polished to a fine gleam, 6 as 5, but also studded with precious stones (optionally, the GM may roll on the 'Precious Stones' table in the 'Treasure' section to see which stones).
63start again, ignoring this result, or a result of 'a palanquin or rickshaw pulled by animated skeletons' but the mount is an undead version of whatever the result is (roll again): 1-2 ghostly, 3 zombie-like, 4 demonic, 5-6 skeletal.
64start again, ignoring this result but the mount has human-like intelligence.
65start again, ignoring this result but the mount can fly (optionally, roll again: 1-3 has wings, 4-6 without wings).
66start again, ignoring this result but the mount is a mechanical simulation of whatever the result is.
 
 
Mounts: Air
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2hot air balloon.
13-4living hot air balloon.
15-6giant bird (roll again: 1-2 eagle 3 swan 4 dove 5 crow 6 vulture).
21-2roll again: 1-2 giant dragonfly 3-4 giant bee 5-6 giant blowfly.
23-4sleigh pulled by reindeer.
25-6roll again: 1-3 flying shark 4-6 flying dolphin.
31-2house (roll again: 1-2 cottage 3 cottage with garden 4-5 family-sized house 6 family-sized house with garden).
33-4magic item allows the bearer to fly: roll on the 'items' table in the 'treasure' section.
35-6flying horse (roll again: 1-3 with wings, 4-6 without wings) - optionally, roll on the 'Horse Colour' table below.
41-2coach pulled by flying horses (optionally roll again: 1-3 with wings, 4-6 without wings)(optionally, roll on the 'Horse Colour' table below).
43-4cloud.
45-6carpet.
51-2broomstick.
53-4small dragon.
55-6roll on the 'Mounts: Land' table above. Treat 'the most common mount in the area' as the most common mount on the land below. Optionally, roll again: 1-3 has wings, 4-6 without wings.
61-2a cloud of butterflies.
63-4a chair (roll again: 1-2 throne 3-4 normal chair 5-6 normal chair, accompanied by side table).
65-6Roll again re-rolling this result or any inanimate object, but the mount is (roll again 1-2 ghostly, 3 zombie-like, 4 demonic, 5-6 skeletal).
 
 
Mounts: Personality
source or inspiration: Toad-Killer-Dog from the Trollbridge forum.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Mean: Likes to bite or threaten anyone who gets too close.
14-6Proud: Likes to preen and prance around other animals.
21-3Well-Trained: Responds well to commands.
24-6Loyal: Always seeks to return to its owner if separated.
31-3Courageous: Never retreats from a fight unless ordered.
34-6Shy: Avoids danger and other creatures.
41-3Ham: Becomes difficult if not given frequent treats or affection.
44-6Flirt: Always chases after mounts of the same species.
51-3Hungry: Always on the look out for a stray bit of food and chews on things.
54-6Possessive: Hates its owner to notice other animals.
61-3Lazy: Hates to run or do heavy labor.
64-6Skittish: Jumps at shadows, startles easily.
 
 
Disease 1: Frequency
source or inspiration: HackMaster
 
Characters should gain a number of 'Exposure Points' per day, depending on where they are and other factors as listed. Note that a character's Exposure Points can fall, but can never go below zero. When a character's points equal or exceed 50, the GM should roll a dice. 1-3 indicates that they've contracted a disease. Whether they do or don't, they lose 50 Exposure Points after the roll is made. If your game system has an attribute like Constitution, Stamina, Toughness etc, the GM may make a roll based on that attribute instead (eg roll 3 dice, get a disease if the number is over the character's Constitution).
 
.
EnvironmentExposure Points Gained Per Day
marsh, swamp8
mountain, arctic or desert environments0
other wilderness2
dungeons2
village4
town5
city6-8, depending on how crowded
on a ship0-8, depending on how crowded
The GM should also apply the following modifiers:
sanitationIf the characters are in a settlement or on board ship, apply a modifier of -3 to +20, depending on how good the sanitation is, with 0 indicating average sanitation (average for a medieval-style society, rather than average for the modern First World).
tropical climate+4
sub-tropical climate+2
summer+2 (except in deserts)
winter-2
If the GM knows that a disease is present+1 to +20, depending on the contagiousness of the disease. Double if the character is in close proximity to those infected (eg a doctor tending them, or adventurers travelling all day with an infected fellow adventurer).
 
 
Disease 2: Symptoms
source or inspiration: 'Dragon' magazine
 
This table gives the effects of a disease, other than loss of Stamina/Life/Hit Points.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2shortness of breath.
13-4paralysis.
15-6blindness.
21-2deafness.
23-4numbness.
25-6fever/chills.
31-2skin sores.
33-4nausea.
35-6rash.
41-2drowsiness.
43-4insanity.
45-6bleeding.
51-2hyperactivity/inability to sleep.
53-4coughing and sneezing.
55-6fatigue, loss of energy.
61-2diarrhea.
63-4hallucinations.
65-6panic attacks.
 
 
Pits (and Similar Traps)
source or inspiration: Sword +1
 
The GM should assign a chance, for example 50%, for such a trap to just be an empty hole in the ground, and otherwise roll on this table.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3The 'pit' is actually the mouth of a hungry creature.
14-6The pit is empty. However the inhabitants of the dungeon check it regularly, and are likely to kill anyone they find.
21-3A bottomless pit - the victim will fall until they die of hunger or thirst unless they find some way to escape.
24-6The victim lands in Hell (or at least in an area whose occupants believe themselves to be in Hell).
31-3Roll on the 'Teleportation' table below, but re-roll result 1-2, 5-6 (the bottom of a pit), and ignore instructions that the victim will find themselves in chains. If the fall is an impossible one (for example they land outside the dungeon) they will land on something which breaks their fall, and thus will take only a small amount of damage from the fall.
34-6The victim lands in the next lowest level of the dungeon. Roll again if the pit is itself on the lowest level.
41-3The pit is filled with water.
44-6As above, and there is a dangerous creature living there (optionlly roll again: 1-2 shark 3-4 giant octopus 5-6 school of pirahnas).
51-3The bottom of the pit is covered in spikes.
54-6As above, but the spikes are also poisoned.
61-3There is a prisoner kept at the bottom of the pit - roll on the 'Prisoners of Evil' table below.
64-6The pit is filled with (roll again: 1-2 spiders 3-4 snakes 5-6 scorpions).
 
 
Events at Sea
source or inspiration: post by user Nephelim on the Dragonsfoot forums.
 
The GM might roll on this table once for every week of travel.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3An island. Optionally, Roll on the 'Islands' tables below.
14-6An apparently uninhabited island - the crew can gather fresh water and food. Roll again: on a 4, there are actually hostile and dangerous animals. On a 5, the island itself is a living creature (roll again: 1-3 the back of a gigantic sea creature 4-6 the island is posessed). On a 6, there are hidden and potentially hostile people (roll again: 1-3 a whole group 4-6 a single person)..
21-3A message in a bottle. Roll again: 1-2 a treasure map 3-4 a captured person pleading for help 5 a scientifically-minded wizard studying the currents offers a reward if he's contacted and told where the bottle was found 6 as for 5, but the scientist isn't a wizard.
24-6A (roll again: 1-2 huge school of fish 3 sea monster 4 school of dolphins 5-6 whale). Roll again: on a 6, they aren't what they seem (roll again: 1-2 protected by a god, 3-4 wizards in disguise 5-6 human-like intelligence).
31-3Mermaids (roll again: on a 1-2, they will be accompanied by jealous and potentially violent mermen).
34-6Another ship. Roll again: 1-2 pirates 3 in need of help 4-5 friendly and willing to trade 6 mysteriously, no one is on board. The ship will have normal supplies which the crew can take (blankets, provisions, fresh water etc), but there is a 50% chance that these items will be cursed..
41-3Conflict among the crew or passengers.
44-6Strange currents that threaten to pull the ship off course.
51-3A storm, that might damage the ship and/or put it off course.
54-6Superstitious sailors demand (roll again: 1-3 that one of the crew or passengers be marooned 4 that the ship change course 5 to be let off at the next island 6 that the ship turn back).
61-3An omen. Roll again, on a 1-3, refer to 'superstitious sailors demand..' above. In any case, roll twice as often for events for the next week.
64-6A port, which is happy to accept the crew, trade, repair the ship etc. The only problem is that the map shows no port here...
 
 
Eye Colour
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Blue-Gray.
14-6Blue.
21-3Light Green.
24-6Olive Green.
31-3Amber (mixture of Brown and Yellow).
34-6Hazel (mixture of Brown and Green).
41-3Light Brown.
44-6as above.
51-3Dark Brown.
54-6as above.
61-3Very Dark Brown.
64-6Violet.
 
 
Eye Shape
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1-3almond-shaped, with epicanthic fold.
4-6rounder, without epicanthic fold.
 
 
Major Events
source or inspiration: TSR version of Oriental Adventures
 
This table is designed to generate events that effect an entire country. The GM might give a 1 in 12 chance for a major event to happen each month.
Obviously some events might not be possible in some areas (for example, flood in an area with almost no rainfall).
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2An ambassador arrives from another country (roll again: on a 6, they're from a previously unknown land). Roll five dice for how many months they stay. They are mostly interested in (roll again: 1-3 diplomatic relations 4-6 swapping magic and/or technogical knowledge). The conditions they offer will be better if i) their country is weak, ii) the host country is powerful, iii) their country is a generally peaceful one, and worse if the opposite is true. Roll again: on a 1 or 2 they will want to arrange a marriage between one of their powerful families and those of the host country.
13-4An important person is assassinated (roll again: 1-3 because of their position, 4-6 because of personal reasons). The assassin is (roll again: 1-2 taken alive 3 killed during the assassination 4 kills themselves immediately after the assasination 5-6 not caught). Roll again: on a 1 there is no clear successor and a power struggle ensues: roll 1 dice for how many months it lasts. It has a 1 in 6 chance of leading to civil war (see below).
15-6An important person dies (roll again: 1-2 of old age, 3-4 of illness, 5-6 by accident). Roll again: on a 1 there is no clear successor and a power struggle ensues: roll 1 dice for how many months it lasts. It has a 1 in 6 chance of leading to civil war (see below).
21-2as above.
23-4A comet is seen in the sky, indicating great events in the future. The GM should triple the chances of an event happening for this month and the next eleven. They should roll for events for the next year immediately. For each event, roll again: on a 1-3, the event can be predicted in broad detail.
25-6Earthquake strikes (roll again: 1-5 a major city 6 the entire land). For each major city effected, roll again: on a 1 to 4 there is a major fire (see below). Then make another roll for each city effected: on a 1 or 2 there is a plague (see below), if there isn't one already.
31-2Famine strikes the land. Roll one dice and add 1 for how many months it lasts. The cost of food will increase, up to 100 times its normal price. Normally law-abiding folk will turn to crime in desperation. Farms will produce no income for a year, and only one quarter of their income for the next year. The population will reduce by 5% each month. There is a 1 in 6 chance of a plague (see below). There is a 4 in 6 chance of a civil war (see below), unless the government acts effectively to relive the suffering.
33-4Major fire. Roll one dice, add 3, then multiply by 10. This is the percentage of the city that is destroyed (it should be 40 to 90%). The city's population is reduced by the same dice roll, minus one, times 5 (0 to 30%). There is a 1 in 2 chance of a plague occuring if one isn't already (see below). The price of building materials is 10 times normal for the next 4 months. The price of food doubles for one month. All these effects assume buildings are mostly made of wood, and that there's no effective fire brigade. If either of these aren't true, the effects can be much less, or the GM might even rule that a major fire can't occur.
35-6Major floods. The population of the land as a whole will not change much, but people will move from the effected area (near coasts or major rivers) to safer places, causing economic upheaval. The price of all goods will be doubled for 1-6 months. If the flood strikes during the planting season, income from farms in the area will be halved for one year. If it strikes during the harvest season, 80% of farm income is lost and there is a 2 in 6 chance of a famine (see above). Planting and harvest season might each last for one quarter of the year. Starting in the next 1-3 months, unless there's one already and unless the government takes effective steps to stop it. In addition, floods have a 1 in 6 chance of causing a plague (see below), if there isn't one already.
41-2A major influx of refugees arrive from a neighbouring country. If there is currently a plague, famine, or similar trouble, there is a 3 in 6 chance that they will be blamed for it, leading to further trouble and violence. There is a 1 in 6 chance that their religion will gain many followers in the country (see below).
43-4A new religion gains many converts. Optionally, roll again to see how overt the conflict is between it and the established religions: on a 5, there is ocassional, spontaneous outbreaks of violence. On a 6 there is frequent, organised violence. Frequent, organised violence has a 1 in 6 chance of leading to civil war (see below). However, all these chances should be modified by the nature of the new and old religions: firstly whether they're peaceful or warlike, and secondly whether they tend to compete with other religions or blend with them. In addition, events such as plague and famine will tend to make the conflict more violent. There is a 1 in 3 chance that there will also be signs of the gods (see below). If so, roll again: 1-2 the new gods, 3-4 the old ones, 5-6 both.
45-6Plague strikes the land. Roll 2 dice for how many months it lasts. The population of the area is reduced by 5% each month. While the plague lasts, the cost of imported goods will be 5 times normal, and the price of all other goods will be doubled, as traders refuse to enter the area.
51-2A political plot is discovered. Roll again: on a 1 or 2, the 'discovery' is false. In any case, many officials are banished, fired, or even killed. The turmoil lasts for 1-3 months. There is a 1 in 6 chance that it will lead to outright civil war (see below).
53-4Civil war. Roll 1 dice for how many months it lasts. What it's about and its chance of success aren't possible to put on a table, because they will vary so widely depending on the country.
55-6Signs of the gods. A god is said to have appeared somewhere in the country. The chance of this being true depends on the role of the gods in the game world. The site of its appearance will become a focus for worship. This may mean that a temple is built there, that pilgrims come, and so on. It might also mean that followers of other gods leave, or are driven away (depending on the nature of the god).
61-2Explorers return with news of a new land. There is a 3 in 6 chance that it will be inhabited, in which case there is a 4 in 6 chance that an ambassador will arrive with the explorers (see above, but there's no need to roll to see whether they come from a previously unknown land).
63-4For this month, many important people will neglect their duties in order to compete for the affections of a noted, unmarried person. There is a 3 in 6 chance that the person will be a prostitute. If duelling exists in the country, duels will indeed be fought. This has a 2 in 6 chance of leading to the death of an important person (see above, but don't roll for how they died).
65-6as above.
 
 
Strange Customs 1
source or inspiration: Snorri. From the Carcosan Grimoire
 
All the Strange Customs tables are intended to be used at once. String the results together in order to get a strange custom for a village or area.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Everyone
2The old people
3Men
4Women
5The priest, priestess, magician or wise woman
6The best warrior
 
 
Strange Customs 2
source or inspiration: Snorri. From the Carcosan Grimoire
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3must eat
14-6must worship
21-3must sacrifice
24-6must completely ignore
31-3must act as if they hate
34-6must avoid
41-3must mummify
44-6must act as if they love
51-3must burn
54-6must drown
61-3must bury
64-6must obey
 
 
Strange Customs 3
source or inspiration: Snorri. From the Carcosan Grimoire
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3women.
14-6men.
21-3people older than themselves.
24-6people younger than themselves.
31-3strangers.
34-6children.
41-3trees.
44-6insects.
51-3rocks.
54-6snakes.
61-3plants.
64-6animals.
 
 
Strange Living Quarters 1
source or inspiration: Snorri. From the Carcosan Grimoire
 
These three tables are intended to be used together.
String the results together in the form (1)(live/s in, are kept in)(2)(3) - for example "Corpses are kept in brightly-painted tents."
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Everyone
14-6The old people
21-3Men
24-6Women
31-3The priest, priestess, magician or wise woman
34-6The best warrior
41-3Slaves or criminals (depending on how evil the place is)
44-6Children
51-3The ruler
54-6Foreigners
61-3Corpses
64-6Animals
 
 
Strange Living Quarters 2
source or inspiration: Snorri. From the Carcosan Grimoire
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3underground
14-6floating
21-3human-shaped
24-6locked
31-3secret
34-6spherical
41-3cramped
44-6living
51-3huge
54-6wooden
61-3metal
64-6roll on the 'Precious and Semi-Precious Stones' table in the 'Treasure' section.
 
 
Strange Living Quarters 3
source or inspiration: Snorri. From the Carcosan Grimoire
 
Roll 1 dice.
1temple/s.
2cave/s.
3tower/s.
4caravan/s.
5pit/s.
6tent/s.
 
 
Hair: Type
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Tightly Coiled.
2as above.
3Curly.
4Wavy.
5Straight.
6as above.
 
 
Hair: Colour
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This chart gives the hair colour for young people. The GM might want to roll to see if the hair has gone 'grey' or white.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2Black.
1-23-4Black.
1-25-6Dark Brown.
3-41-2Light Brown.
3-43-4Platinum Blond (nearly white).
3-45-6Blond.
5-61-2Orange.
5-63-4Auburn (mixture of brown and red).
5-65-6Red.
 
 
Facial Hair 1: Male Beards, Mustaches and Sideburns
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Before rolling on this table, the GM might roll to see any facial hair is present (for example you might give a 50% chance of this).

This table and the ones below can be used for individuals, or to find out the prevailing fashion in an area, or for a group.

Thanks to Wikipedia for the pictures in this table and the ones below.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1mustache and beard.
2as above.
3mustache only.
4beard only.
5 mustache, no beard, large sideburns..
6 no beard or mustache, but large sideburns.
 
 
Facial Hair 2: Beards
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1 large.
2 moderate.
3 small.
4 long goatee.
5 medium goatee.
6 short goatee.
 
 
Facial Hair 3: Mustaches
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1-2 short.
3-4 medium.
5-6 long.
 
 
Facial Hair 4: Eyebrows
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1left unmanaged.
2as above.
3finely plucked.
4shaved entirely.
5as above, but an artificial eyebrow is drawn in.
6artificially made to look bigger.
 
 
Headgear
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Before rolling on this table, the GM might want to roll to see if any headgear is worn (for example you might give a 50% chance of this).
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2 turban.
1-23-4 fez.
1-25-6 None, but a small mark on the forehead.
3-41-2None, but an elaborate design on the forehead. Roll on the 'Emblems' table below for what.
3-43-4 headband.
3-45-6 headscarf.
5-61-2 Three-cornered hat.
5-63-4 None, but a mask covering the eyes.
5-65-6 Headgear covering the entire head and face, other than the eyes.
 
 
Skin Tone
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1-2'white'.
3-4brown.
5-6'black'.
 
 
Titles of a Magician
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Augurer.
13-4Conjurer.
15-6Diviner.
21-2Elementalist.
23-4Enchanter.
25-6Magus.
31-2Necromancer.
33-4Prestidigitator.
35-6Seer.
41-2Shaman.
43-4Soothsayer.
45-6Sorcerer.
51-2Thaumaturge.
53-4Wise Woman or Cunning Man.
55-6Witch or Warlock.
61-2Wizard.
63-4Use the 'Good Magical Creatures' tables instead, in the 'Magic and Religion' and 'Creating Creatures' sections.
65-6Use the 'Evil Magical Creatures' tables instead, in the 'Magic and Religion' and 'Creating Creatures' sections.
 
 
Hirelings 1: Price
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table is meant to generate what share of the treasure hired non-player characters will want. In any given area, roll once for the going rate. If your game includes attributes such as Charisma, Haggling etc, these will effect the roll.

This table is meant for non-player characters in supporting roles, such as torch bearers, treasure-carriers, rowers, guides, interpreters etc. They'll always be last into a room, will only fight to defend themselves, and then only if they can't run and hide, won't test any potions etc. Characters who take the same risks as the players will want at least the same share as the player characters. If they have special skills, such as magic, they might want double.

The players can always pay less than the going rate - as little as half. In this case, the GM should roll at least once for each non-player character on 'Hirelings 2: Flaws' below. They can also pay more than the going rate. In this case they won't necessarily get better quality hirelings, but they will be more loyal: they'll be likely to fight if attacked rather than run, and less likely to abandon the players in danger.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1One fourth (25%) the treasure of a player-character.
2Three tenths (30%).
3Two fifths (40%).
4One half (50%).
5Three fifths (60%).
6Seven tenths (70%).
 
 
Hirelings 2: Flaws
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2Too noisy - will attract hostile attention.
1-23-4Greedy - eats twice normal rations.
1-25-6Steals from the party.
3-41-2Gets into arguments with party members.
3-43-4Overly frightened, and will make other hirelings frightened.
3-45-6Cursed, and will bring bad luck on the whole party.
5-61-2Physically feeble.
5-63-4Mentally feeble.
5-65-6Roll twice more, ignoring and re-rolling this result.
 
 
Half-Elves, -Orcs and Others
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table is designed for creatures whose parents are different species/kindred/'races', to decide how their statistics are generated.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1The creature will be treated as if it was the same kindred as its father.
2The creature will be treated as if it was the same kindred as its mother.
3The creature will have characteristics which are halfway between those of its father and mother.
4For any given characteristic, the creature will take after the 'better' kindred (for example if one parent has a high Strength and a low Dexterity, and the other a high Dexterity and a low Strength, the creature would have high Strength and high Dexterity). The creature will also be sterile.
5For any given characteristic, the creature will take after the worse kindred.
6Roll seperately on this table for each characteristic. If you get this result again, treat it as a result of 'halfway between the mother and father'..
 
 
Burglaries
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table generates what security will be present in a house that the characters break into.

Usually the GM will roll only once on this table. In unusually rich or poor areas, roll twice. In areas where rich and poor live close together, roll three times for rich people's houses and twice for everyone else. Getting the same result (other than 'nothing') more than once means, for example, an unusually difficult lock, unusually vicious or perceptive guard dogs, and so on.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Nothing.
14-6Nothing.
21-3Locks.
24-6Traps (optionally roll again: on a 6 the traps will be magical. In wizards' houses the traps will be magical without having to roll)(optionally roll again: 1-3 the entrances to the house have traps 4-6 valuables have traps).
31-3Guard or guards (optionally roll 1 dice for how many)(optionally roll again: 1-3 animals 4-6 humans, or another intelligent species if your campaign world has them).
34-6The occupants are unusually light sleepers.
41-3The occupants are armed, with hand-to-hand weapons.
44-6The occupants are armed, with ranged weapons.
51-3Valuables are unusually well-hidden (optionally roll again: on a 6 the valuables will be magically hidden. In wizards' houses the valuables will be magically hidden without having to roll).
54-6Valuables are cursed.
61-3Valuables are very distinctive, making them difficult to sell.
64-6Valuables are unusually difficult to move (for example there's no gold, but plenty of statues).
 
 
No Fishing
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
In the wilderness, if the heroes try fishing, they might attract the hostility of some guardian. The GM might give this a 1 in 6 chance of happening.
Characters skilled in magic and/or wilderness lore might be able to tell whether a given place will have a guardian.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2A priest/ess, outraged that the characters have fished in waters sacred to their god.
1-23-4As above, but accompanied by a crowd of worshippers.
1-25-6Similar to the above, but the god themselves appears.
3-41-2The fish are intelligent, and naturally resist this attempt to kill and eat them.
3-43-4As above, but the 'fish' are actually wizards who've taken on fish form.
3-45-6The fish are led and protected by a demon of the sea.
5-61-2A dryad allows no killing in her territory.
5-63-4A fish noble appears, demanding that the characters pay treasure to compensate for the loss of his kinsfolk.
5-65-6The water is alive, and treats the characters as if they'd attacked it.
 
 
Bandits, Pirates and Highwaymen
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2They'll kill everyone, even if they try to surrender.
1-23-4As above, but they'll take some captives (roll again: 1-3 as slaves 4-6 to ransom).
1-25-6They'll give their victims the chance to surrender, but if they refuse they'll try to kill everyone.
3-41-2They're mostly interested in capturing people to ransom them.
3-43-4They'll try to negotiate a 'fee' for allowing their victims safe passage.
3-45-6'Your lupins or your life!' They're obsessed with one unusual form of goods - eg only red clothing, or only clocks. They'll let anyone go who doesn't have this item. They'll try to kill anyone who has a relevant item and refuses to hand it over.
5-61-2As above, but their demands change from one set of victims to the next.
5-63-4They won't attack (roll again: 1-2 poor people 3 priests 4 anyone but agents of the hated government 5 members of their own religion 6 members of their own species if your campaign world has more than one intelligent species, or their nationality if there's only one intelligent species). Roll again, ignoring this result if you get it again, for their treatment of everyone else.
5-65-6They're mostly interested in driving people out of their territory. If their victims turn around and leave they won't pursue them. Roll again, ignoring this result or the one above, for what they'll do if their victims refuse.
 
 
Conflict 1: Who or What Is Being Fought Over?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table is intended to be used with 'Conflict 2' below.
For more interesting results, generate two conflicts and combine them in a single adventure.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1A child. roll again: 1 the heir to a position 2 who has important information 3 who is ordinary in all ways 4-6 who has remarkable skill in (roll again 1 magic 2 art 3 sport 4 craft 5 oratory 6 religion).
2An adult (roll again as above).
3A group of people (roll again: 1 a family 2 a village 3 a town 4 a city 5 a province 6 a country).
4Land (roll again as above - if the result is 'a family', roll again: 1-3 their farm 4-6 their house).
5A group of people (roll again: 1 a non-human species 2 a religious sect 3 a wilderness tribe 4 a coven of witches 5 a school of magic 6 a knightly order).
6An item of great (roll again twice - if you get the same result twice, don't re-roll: 1 magical power - optionally, go to the 'Item Types' table in the 'Treasure' section, but assume that the item is magic. Re-roll any items that can never be magical 2 religious importance - optionally, go to the 'Magic and Religion' section and roll on the two 'Sacred Objects' tables 3 artistic value 4 historical value 5 military value 6 purely monetary value - eg an unusually large gem).
 
 
Conflict 2: What Type of Conflict?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Open War: people working for the opposing sides will openly attack each other, intending to fight to the death.
2Secret War: people working for the opposing sides will attack each other, intending to fight to the death, but must hide their acts from the law and public opinion.
3Theft: people working for the opposing sides will steal from each other, and this might lead to violence - although they aren't trying to assassinate each other as above.
4Crime vs the Law: one side in the conflict is a criminal organisation, the other represents the law. The criminal side will have the advantage that they can use means that the law won't, while the law has the ability to act openly and the support of the population.
5Rebels vs the Empire: Similar to the above. However the criminals have good motives and the support of the population, and the law will do things that the criminals won't.
6Political Conflict: people working for the opposing sides are mainly trying to win the support of the population. They won't do violence to each other.
 
 
Diplomacy
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table generates the relations between two groups. It can be used for tribes, groups of creatures in a dungeon, factions in a city and so on.

The two 'Conflict' tables, in the 'Adventure Ideas' section, give more detailed results for a single conflict.
Those tables are more designed to come up with an adventure idea quickly, whereas this table is more designed for 'world-building'.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1At war If the two groups come into contact, they'll fight each other or run. If the player characters are perceived as being allied with one group by the other, they'll have a severe penalty on any attempts to make friends. If the delvers present evidence that they've attacked one of the groups to the other, they'll have a bonus on such attempts.
2Hostile If the two groups come into contact, they'll often end up fighting each other. They certainly won't allow the other group to pass through their territory. If the delvers are perceived as being allied with one group by the other, they'll have a penalty on any attempts to make friends. This penalty will be less than if the groups were at war. If the player characters are being persecuted by one group, the other will usually shelter them, if only out of spite.
3Allied The two groups are quite friendly. They'll at least listen to the other group's opinion and discuss with them if possible, when deciding what to do with the player characters. If the player characters are perceived as being hostile to one group, they'll have a severe penalty on any attempt to make friends with the other.
4Strongly Allied The two groups will regard an attack on the other as an attack on them. They'll usually respect the decision of the other group in regard to how to treat the player characters.
5Wary The two groups would like to destroy each other, but fear the results of open conflict. If the delvers are perceived as being allied with one groups by the other, they'll have a penalty on any attempt to make friends. This penalty will be about the same as if the groups were hostile. The two groups are likely to help the player characters with any plan which will weaken the other group, but only if they can do so in a way that allows them to deny involvement.
6No Contact The two groups have no resource that they both want, and no way to beneficially work together. They're thus neither allied nor opposed. Re-roll this result if you want every group to be involved in a conflict.
 
 
Consequences of Drunkenness
source or inspiration: Chaotic Shiny's 'Tavern Tables'
 
The GM should decide on the chance of rolling on this table, based on the amount consumed and the toughness of the drinker. The effects of this table are in addition to being hung over.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Roll on the 'Gambling' table below. The character risks all the money they have with them.
13-4The character has no money, and can't remember where it went.
15-6The character only has half the money they should have, and can't remember where the rest went.
21-2The character wakes up naked.
23-4The character has lost an important item, even if they didn't take it out with them. It must be one that they could have gotten access to during the night. If there is no such item, roll again.
25-6The character has made an expensive and largely useless purchase.
31-2The character is wounded, having been in a fist-fight.
33-4The character has a new tattoo.
35-6The character has a new enemy.
41-2The character has let slip some information that they should have kept secret.
43-4The character wakes up in jail, having committed a minor offense.
45-6The character wakes up far from the town or city they were in. It must be a distance they could have travelled during the night, but remember that magic might allow travel over great distances.
51-2The character has joined a cult that is unlikely to let them leave easily.
53-4The character has joined an army (including possibly a rebel army).
55-6The character killed someone. Roll again: 1-2 accident 3-4 self-defence 5-6 the character's fault. Optionally alter these chances based on how good or evil the character is.
61-2The character has gotten married.
63-4The character has arranged to fight a duel.
65-6The character has bought a 'magic' item. Roll again 1-2 isn't magic 3-4 is magic but doesn't work properly 5-6 is magic, but doesn't do what it's supposed to.
 
 
Gambling
source or inspiration: Chaosium's book 'Cities'
 
One roll on this table is intended to cover an entire session of gambling.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3The characters lose their bet, and are accused of cheating. Roll one dice and add 1. They must leave town for this many weeks, or face a high chance of having to roll on 'Consequences of Unpaid Debt' below..
14-6The characters lose double what they bet. If they can't pay this amount, roll 1 dice and subtract 1. If the result is over 0, they must leave town for this many weeks, or face a high chance of having to roll on 'Consequences of Unpaid Debt' below.
21-3as above.
24-6The characters lose half their bet.
31-3as above.
34-6as above.
41-3The characters break even.
44-6The characters win an amount equal to half their bet (for example if they bet 100 gold pieces, they end up with 150).
51-3The characters win an amount equal to their bet.
54-6The characters win an amount equal to twice what they bet.
61-3The characters win an amount equal to three times what they bet. There is a chance that they'll be accused of cheating. If they are, they can either walk away (treat as breaking even), or take their winnings. If they take their winnings, roll one dice and add 1. They must leave town for this many weeks, or face a high chance of having to roll on 'Consequences of Unpaid Debt' below..
64-6The characters win an amount equal to three times what they bet. However, they gain a reputation as skilled gamblers, such that no one in the area will let them bet. The amount of time this effect lasts depends on the size of their winnings: it might be only for a few weeks, or it might be for years.
 
 
Consequences of Unpaid Debt
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Results marked with a (+) will only happen if the debt is owed to someone who is willing and able to use criminal means to recover their money. This doesn't necessarily mean that they themselves have to be criminals. Some people will sell the debt to criminals, or hire them - especially if they're not able to use the law. Some people might be prepared to use some of these methods, but not others.

Results marked with a (-) will only happen if the debt is owed to someone who is able to use legal means to recover their money. Some criminals might be unable or unwilling to use these methods. However in more corrupt areas, or with more 'respectable' criminals, they may. On the other hand, in some places honest but poor people might not be able to use these methods.

Also note that most people will give the characters extra time to pay, in return for increasing the amount of debt. They will only use the options on this table when they conclude that they're never going to get their money.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3(+) The characters will be attacked by thugs who will try to beat them.
14-6The characters will find that shopkeepers will be likely to refuse to serve them, inns will be likely to refuse them a room, and so on.
21-3as above.
24-6The characters will be offered the option of doing an unpleasant and time-consuming, but not illegal, job to clear their debt. If they refuse, the result depends on whether the offer is 'unofficial' or made by the local law. If it's unofficial, roll again on this table, re-rolling if you get this result again. If it's official, the characters are likely to be arrested and kept in jail for a period of time that depends on the size of their debt.
31-3(+) The characters will be offered the option of doing a dangerous and illegal task to clear their debt. If they refuse, roll again on this table, re-rolling if you get this result again.
34-6(+) Thieves will rob the characters, trying to take enough goods to clear the debt. If the thieves are driven off, or they don't get enough goods, roll again on this table, re-rolling if you get this result again.
41-3(-) The characters will be visited by magistrates working for the government, who will seize goods to sell to clear the debt. Driving off the magistrates will be a criminal act and expose the characters to other consequences. If the goods don't cover the debt, roll again on this table, re-rolling if you get this result again, or thieves.
44-6as above.
51-3(-) The characters will be arrested, and stay in jail for a period of time that depends on the amount of their debt. Re-roll if the debt is a result of criminal activity, illegal gambling etc.
54-6(-) as above.
61-3(possibly +) A witch, evil sorcerer etc will be hired to curse the characters. Although this might not be criminal, many people will refuse to use this method. In this case roll again.
64-6(+) The characters will be attacked by assassins who will try to kill them.
 
 
Who Owns Yonder Castle?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table doesn't roll for different species, since that will differ strongly from one game world to the next.
The GM might come up with a chance of the owner being non-human, and roll that seperately to the roll on this table.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3A (roll again: 1-2 commoner 3-4 barbarian 5-6 mysterious individual who appeared one day), who was given a title, and the lands and castle, as a reward for their heroism.
14-6An order of priests who (roll again: 1 are never seen - people arrive, but they never venture out 2 oppress the people with their fanaticism 3 are charitable and kind 4 don't take their vows very seriously 5 cause strange lights with their study of magic 6 mostly keep themselves to themselves).
21-3A dragon.
24-6An evil wizard (roll again: 1-2 is also a noble, 3-4 has bewitched the rightful owner of the castle 5 bought it with their seemingly endless wealth, whereof no-one knows the source 6 created the castle with their magic).
31-3A benign wizard (roll again as above, but 3-4 becomes 'was given it in gratitude by the former owner').
34-6No-one but the ghosts (roll again: 1-2 the castle is really haunted 3-4 it's abandoned 5 Scooby-Doo style, an evil wizard is creating the impression that it's haunted 6 it was abandoned, but travellers now make use of it).
41-3We don't have a lord. We're an anarcho-syndicalist collective.
44-6Strangely enough, an actual feudal lord (or lady).
51-3As above, but they're unusually brutal and oppressive (roll again: on a 1 or 2, they're really a vampire).
54-6As for (4, 4-6), but they're unusually mild and just.
61-3As for (4, 4-6), but they're unusually brave and fanatical (roll again: on a 1, they're really a robot).
64-6As for (4, 4-6), but they're unusually decadent and corrupt (roll again: on a 1 or 2 they're really a vampire).
 
 
Solar Systems 1: What Is the Sun?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2A ball of dung pushed by a scarab/dung beetle.
1-23-4Paradoxically, it is merely (roll again: 1-3 a shield 4-6 a mirror) which reflects the real Sun.
1-25-6The eye of a one-eyed (roll again 1-3 god or goddess, 4-6 beast) (optionally roll again: on a 1-3 the moon is its stolen other eye).
3-41-2A nugget of gold, riding on a (roll again: 1-3 chariot 4-6 boat).
3-43-4The crown of a god or goddess, who rides on a (roll again: 1-3 chariot 4-6 boat).
3-45-6The burning wheel of a (roll again: 1-3 chariot 4-6 cart).
5-61-2A golden apple, which is eaten each night but grows again in the morning.
5-63-4The burning body of a dead and ancient (roll again 1-3 god or goddess, 4-6 beast).
5-65-6A burning ball of gas.
 
 
Solar Systems 2: What Shape Is the World?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
For results marked with a (&), roll on Solar System tables 3 and 4 below.
For results marked with a (+), don't roll on either table.
For any other result, roll on table 3 but don't roll on table 4.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3A sphere, like the real world.
14-6A sphere - however the world is on the inside of the sphere, with the sun at the centre (+)
21-3A sphere - however only the very top of the sphere is liveable, because people fall off everywhere else (&)
24-6A sphere - however one side of the world is always hot and the other always cold, with only a narrow band where people can live. Optionally roll again: 1-3 this is because the planet always keeps the same face towards the sun 4-6 this is because spirits of fire live on one side and spirits of ice on the other.
31-3A cube. Optionally roll again: On a 1-3 each side of the cube is dominated by a different 'element': for example earth, air, fire, water, wood and metal (or light and darkness).
34-6A pyramid shape. Optionally roll again: 1-3 square pyramid (four triangles and one square) 4-6 triangular pyramid (four triangles). Optionally roll again: On a 1-3 each side of the pyramid is dominated by a different 'element': for example (for a triangular pyramid) earth, air, fire and water, or (for a square pyramid) the same but with the square being dominated by darkness.
41-3A series of tunnels and chambers hollowed out of rock and earth - they may range from house-sized, to city-sized, to big enough to contain their own suns. The overall shape of the world/universe is unknown (or optionally roll again on this table, ignoring this result, for the overall shape of the world) (+)
44-6Flat, circular, with mountains all around the edge keeping the seas in (&)
51-3Flat, circular, with a giant snake all around the edge keeping the seas in (&)
54-6Flat, circular, with nothing at the edges to keep the seas in - ships can fall off the edge of the world (&)
61-3Flat, square, with mountains all around the edges keeping the seas in (&)
64-6Flat, square, with giant creatures holding up each corner. Optionally, roll on 'Creatures 5b: Animals' in the 'Creating Creatures' section for what creature (&)
 
 
Solar Systems 3: Does the World Orbit the Sun, or Vice-Versa?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1All planets travel around the sun.
2as above.
3The sun and other planets travel around the world.
4as above.
5Other planets travel around the world. The Sun is located on the world. The sun leaves the world in the morning from a distant land in the east,
travels across the sky, and returns at sunset to a distant land in the west. It travels east through the underworld during the night.
6The Sun travels around the world, but other planets travel around the sun.
 
 
Solar Systems 4: What Holds the World Up?
source or inspiration: Spelljammer
 
Roll 1 dice.
1A giant boat.
2A huge creature. Optionally roll again on this table for what the creature is standing on. Optionally roll on 'Creatures 5b: Animals' in the 'Creating Creatures' section for what creature.
3An infinitely tall pillar. Optionally roll on Solar Systems table 4a below for what it's made of.
4An invisible sea.
5Invisible clockwork, which also controls every object's orbit.
6Nothing: the world is hurtling downward through space. Luckily, the sun and other planets are falling at the same speed.
 
 
Solar Systems 4a: What Is the World-Pillar Made of?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll on this table only if directed to by table 4 above.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3dirt.
14-6air.
21-3fire.
24-6water.
31-3ice.
34-6wood.
41-3gold.
44-6silver.
51-3light.
54-6darkness.
61-3Roll on the 'Precious and Semi-Precious Stones' in the 'Treasure' section.
64-6Roll twice more on this table.
 
 
Effects of Hearing a Swansong
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table refers to the myth that a swan, just before it dies, will sing a beautiful song.
If the players are the kind to kill a swan in order to hear the song, the GM might specify that this won't work (for example the swan might refuse to sing if its murderers will hear).
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2The player will become obsessed with hearing another swansong, and will slowly waste away if they aren't pursuing this aim.
1-23-4The player will become terrified of hearing another swansong, to the point that they may become crippled with fear in the presence of a swan. If they actually hear another swansong they will lose the fear (and must roll again on this table as anyone else would).
1-25-6The player's singing voice will improve, but only when they're singing sad songs.
3-41-2The player's ability to write songs and poetry, but only sad songs or poetry, will improve.
3-43-4The player will be prone to crippling fits of melancholia, when they'll be almost unable to act. Only magic can cure this affliction.
3-45-6The player will learn the identity (and location) of their one true love.
5-61-2The player will have an increased ability to communicate with, and gain the trust of, all birds.
5-63-4The player will be completely unable to harm any bird (or eat any bird) - even monstrous ones, and even if they're being attacked. Only magic can remove this inability.
5-65-6The player, just before they die, will themselves sing a 'swansong', which will cause any who hear it to roll on this table.
 
 
Humans Met In A Dungeon
source or inspiration: D&D Rules Cyclopedia
 
Optionally roll three dice and take the lowest single result, for the number of humans that the heroes meet.
These tables can also be used for human-like creatures such as dwarves and elves, if they exist in your campaign world.
Note that there's another table below, 'Prisoners of Evil', especially for prisoners met in a dungeon.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1They're trying to get out of the dungeon, having found it too dangerous. Optionally roll three dice and take the lowest result - if this is higher than the number met, it represents the original size of their group. For each missing member, roll one dice: 1-3 killed, 4-5 captured, 6 missing. Optionally roll again: on a 1 or 2, they're being chased by creatures of the dungeon. Optionally roll again to see what they were attempting: 1-2 entered the dungeon by mistake, 3-4 looking for an item believed to be in the dungeon, 5-6 looking for a friend who's believed to be in the dungeon.
2They live in the dungeon. Optionally roll again: 1-2 they're bandits 3-4 they're refugees 5-6 they live among the dungeon creatures: roll on the two 'Outsiders in a Group' tables below.
3Bait - they're working with creatures in the dungeon, to lure the heroes into a trap or ambush. Optionally roll again: 1-2 working willingly with the creatures 3-4 forced into it 5-6 their will has been altered, for example by magic. Optionally, roll again, ignoring this result, for what story they will tell the heroes.
4Escaped prisoners of creatures in the dungeon. Optionally, roll on 'Prisoners of Evil' below.
5They're looking for a friend who has been captured by creatures in the dungeon. Optionally roll on 'Prisoners of Evil' below for who their friend is (they may not be truthful with the heroes).
6They're looking for an item which is believed to be in the dungeon (the heroes may be looking for the same one).
 
 
Spell or Magic Item Names: part 1
source or inspiration: Max Davenport (permission given),
and Uncle Bear (Creative Commons license)
 
For spells, these tables work best with whichever of the name tables (in the 'Personalising Characters' section) best fits your game world.
The name can go at the start or the end - for example, 'Seti's Melancholy Bargain' or 'The Melancholy Bargain of Seti'.

For magic items, you might want to use the type of item (eg wand, ring, cloak) as well as, or instead of, a name:
for example 'The Wand of the Melancholy Bargain', or 'Seti's Wand of the Melancholy Bargain'.
Sometimes these tables will generate a name which suggests a particular type of item: for example 'Ariana's Remarkable Cage'.
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
111-2Abhorrent.
113-4Aggravating.
115-6All-Knowing.
121-2All-Seeing.
123-4Arcane.
125-6Audacious.
131-2Augmentative.
133-4Auspicious.
135-6Beatific.
141-2Bedeviling.
143-4Benevolent.
145-6Burning.
151-2Cacophonous.
153-4Canine.
155-6Chimerical.
161-2Conquering.
163-4Consummate.
165-6Corrupting.
211-2Crepuscular.
213-4Delerious.
215-6Dimensional.
221-2Disintegrating.
223-4Dissonant.
225-6Dolorous.
231-2Elaborate.
233-4Eldritch.
235-6Elemental.
241-2Empyrean.
243-4Enduring.
245-6Enervating.
251-2Enfeebling.
253-4Enigmatic.
255-6Enraging.
261-2Ethereal.
263-4Excruciating.
265-6Feline.
311-2Flaming.
313-4Fortuitous.
315-6Fulminating.
321-2Ghoulish.
323-4Gibbering.
325-6Glittering.
331-2Grandiloquent.
333-4Gratifying.
335-6Hallucinatory.
341-2Harmonious.
343-4Hermetical.
345-6Hideous.
351-2Ignescent.
353-4Impedimental.
355-6Improbable.
361-2Indomitable.
363-4Inexorable.
365-6Invisible.
411-2Irascible.
413-4Iridescent.
415-6Legerdemainic.
421-2Lissome.
423-4Lurid.
425-6Magnificent.
431-2Malign.
433-4Malevolent.
435-6Melancholy.
441-2Mesmeric.
443-4Metamorphic.
445-6Mordant.
451-2Multipotent.
453-4Mutable.
455-6Mystifying.
461-2Nourishing.
463-4Nullifying.
465-6Numinous.
511-2Ostentatious.
513-4Ungainly.
515-6Pernicious.
521-2Perseverant.
523-4Persnickety.
525-6Phantasmagoric.
531-2Phantasmal.
533-4Phlegmatic.
535-6Prismatic.
541-2Protective.
543-4Risible.
545-6Prestidigitative.
551-2Propitious.
553-4Protective.
555-6Pugnacious.
561-2Puissant.
563-4Remarkable.
565-6Ruinous.
611-2Salubrious.
613-4Sanctimonious.
615-6Scintillant.
621-2Sickening.
623-4Spidery.
625-6Staggering.
631-2Stinking.
633-4Tenebrous.
635-6Triumphant.
641-2Truculent.
643-4Tumultuous.
645-6Undulating.
651-2Unending.
653-4Unstoppable.
655-6Vampiric.
661-2Vexatious.
663-4Vitriolic.
665-6Vulpine.
 
 
Spell or Magic Item Names: part 2
source or inspiration: Max Davenport (permission given),
and Uncle Bear (Creative Commons license)
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
111-2Abyss.
113-4Acid.
115-6Affliction.
121-2Agent.
123-4Anchor.
125-6Armour.
131-2Arrival.
133-4Augury.
135-6Aura.
141-2Banishment.
143-4Bargain.
145-6Bauble.
151-2Binding.
153-4Blade.
155-6Blindness.
161-2Bolt.
163-4Bond.
165-6Bubble.
211-2Cage.
213-4Charm.
215-6Cloud.
221-2Command.
223-4Conjuration.
225-6Contagion.
231-2Cornucopia.
233-4Dance.
235-6Dart.
241-2Deceit.
243-4Demand.
245-6Diablerie.
251-2Ditty.
253-4Diversion.
255-6Dodge.
261-2Doom.
263-4Door.
265-6Dweomer.
311-2Evocation.
313-4Eye.
315-6Fever.
321-2Figment.
323-4Finger.
325-6Fit.
331-2Flame.
333-4Flesh.
335-6Fog.
341-2Fright.
343-4Frost.
345-6Gate.
351-2Gaze.
353-4Glance.
355-6Globe.
361-2Gloom.
363-4Grace.
365-6Grease.
411-2Growth.
413-4Guardian.
415-6Hand.
421-2Hex.
423-4Idol.
425-6Insult.
431-2Iron.
433-4Jar.
435-6Jig.
441-2Languor.
443-4Laughter.
445-6Leap.
451-2Meteor.
453-4Mirage.
455-6Mist.
461-2Mouth.
463-4Net.
465-6Oath.
511-2Oddment.
513-4Pattern.
515-6Phantom.
521-2Refuge.
523-4Retreat.
525-6Roar.
531-2Rune.
533-4Scourge.
535-6Servant.
541-2Shield.
543-4Sigil.
545-6Simulacrum.
551-2Sleigh.
553-4Spark.
555-6Sphere.
561-2Suggestion.
563-4Summoning.
565-6Swarm.
611-2Swoon.
613-4Sword.
615-6Talisman.
621-2Tide.
623-4Tower.
625-6Vault.
631-2Veil.
633-4Vigour.
635-6Visage.
641-2Vision.
643-4Vista.
645-6Wall.
651-2Ward.
653-4Web.
655-6Weird.
661-2Whimsy.
663-4Whisper.
665-6Word.
 
 
Villains
source or inspiration: kellri
 
You might want to roll more than once on this table, and combine the results. For example, 'an insane serial murderer' and 'a powerful demon' might indicate that the lunatic serves the demon, and hopes to raise it using the blood of their victims.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2A powerful monster, such as a dragon.
13-4A powerful demon (optionally, roll on the two 'Evil Magic Creatures - Titles' tables in the 'Magic and Religion' section).
15-6A mad wizard, witch, sorceress etc (optionally, roll on the 'Magic Specialties' and the two 'Familiars' tables in the 'Magic and Religion' section).
21-2An insane serial murderer.
23-4An evil king or prince (optionally, roll on the 'Titles of an Aristocratic Ruler' table in the 'Settlements and Countries' section).
25-6An evil queen (optionally, roll on the 'Titles of an Aristocratic Ruler' table in the 'Settlements and Countries' section).
31-2An army of monsters, such as goblins.
33-4Barbarian invaders.
35-6'Civilised' invaders.
41-2Alien invaders.
43-4A group of assassins.
45-6A group of thieves.
51-2A group of pirates.
53-4A group of vampires.
55-6The followers of an evil god.
61-2Roll again ignoring this result. The villain or villains are controlling the body of a child or children.
63-4Roll again, ignoring this result. The villain or villains are widely loved and believed to be good.
65-6Roll again, ignoring this result. The villain or villains used to be good, but turned evil.
 
 
Knightly Adventure Ideas
source or inspiration: Knights of Camelot
 
These adventures are more suitable for campaigns with a chivalrous, King Arthur or fairy tale tone to them
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3A fair lady (or handsome prince) lives in a nearby castle, and is the true love of one of the heroes. The heroes must help the smitten character successfully win their heart.
14-6A (roll again: 1-2 lady 3-4 aged priest 5-6 mixed group of pilgrims) is/are making a pilgrimage to a nearby shrine, and must be escorted.
21-3A fierce beast is terrorising the countryside, and must be hunted. Finding the beast will be as difficult as defeating it.
24-6A (roll again: 1-2 group of wicked knights 3-4 wicked knight 5-6 good knight who has fallen into madness) is/are terrorising the countryside. They must be challenged and defeated. The knight/s will expertly twist the laws of chivalry against the heroes.
31-3A group of bandits are terrorising the countryside, and must be captured or killed. Their cunning in the forest is more dangerous than their skill at arms.
34-6An enchantress has bewitched many knights into her service. Her spell must be broken and the knights freed.
41-3To prove their courage, the characters must stay at a crossroads, challenging every suitable opponent who travels by (but sparing any who ask for mercy).
44-6Roll again, ignoring this result, or that of courting a fair lady - the resulting adventure is being undertaken as penance (optionally, roll on the 'Character Flaws' table in the 'Personalising Characters' section for the flaw that led to the requirement for penance).
51-3Roll again, ignoring this result - to get to the resulting adventure, the characters must first journey through a perilous forest.
54-6Roll again, ignoring this result - to get to the resulting adventure, the characters must first take a perilous journey by sea.
61-3Roll again, ignoring this result - the characters are introduced to the adventure by a venerable hermit.
64-6Roll again, ignoring this result - the characters are hunting an animal who speaks to them, telling them of the resulting adventure (optionally roll again: the animal is 1-2 a deer 3-4 a unicorn 5-6 a lion).
 
 
Planetary Romance Plots: Table A: Villain/s
source or inspiration: Savage Swords of Athanor
 
The following tables gives adventure ideas which have a similar feel to Edgar Rice Burroughs' Barsoom series.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Cowardly and Treacherous Noble.
14-6Wise Member of a Dying Race.
21-3Wise Sole Survivor of a Dead Race.
24-6Cold and Amoral Scientist.
31-3Heartless Assassin.
34-6Rival of the Heroes.
41-3Bounty Hunter.
44-6Slavers.
51-3Pirates.
54-6Bandits.
61-3Cultists.
64-6Roll twice on this table.
 
 
Planetary Romance Plots: Table B: Evil Scheme
source or inspiration: Savage Swords of Athanor
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Kidnapping.
14-6Theft.
21-3Exploration.
24-6Chase.
31-3Attack.
34-6Brainwashing.
41-3Brain-stealing.
44-6Dishonor/Besmirch.
51-3Sell into Slavery.
54-6Imprison.
61-3Transform.
64-6Make Comatose.
 
 
Planetary Romance Plots: Table C: Victim of the Scheme, or Ally of the Heroes
source or inspiration: Savage Swords of Athanor
 
Optionally, roll again:
1-2 The result on this table is the victim.
3-4 The result on this table is an ally of the heroes.
5 The result on this table is both victim and ally.
6 Roll twice on this table: the first time for the victim, the second for the ally.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Beautiful Princess.
14-6Noble Savage.
21-3Brave Warrior.
24-6Strange Alien.
31-3Scientist.
34-6roll again: 1-3 Philosopher 4-6 Scholar.
41-3Priest.
44-6Ousted Nobleman.
51-3Misunderstood Scoundrel.
54-6Loyal Handmaiden.
61-3Brute with a Heart of Gold.
64-6Warrior-Maiden Who Will Not Allow Herself to Love.
 
 
Planetary Romance Plots: Table D: Important Object
source or inspiration: Savage Swords of Athanor
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Ancient Weapon of Vast Power.
14-6Terrible Monster from the Dim Past.
21-3Advanced Power Source.
24-6Terraforming Device.
31-3Last Scion of an Ancient Race.
34-6Device that Will Give the User God-Like Powers.
41-3Mind Control Device.
44-6Army of Robots.
51-3Library of Lost Knowledge.
54-6Still Functioning Ancient Computer.
61-3Still Functioning Wise and Ancient Robot.
64-6Wise and Powerful Disembodied Brain.
 
 
Planetary Romance Plots: Table E: Secret That the Heroes Discover
source or inspiration: Savage Swords of Athanor
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2Lost City of Ancients Who are Now Degenerate.
1-23-4Lost City of Ancients Who Have Vast Mental Powers But are Now Amoral.
1-25-6Lost City of Wise and Benevolent Ancients.
3-41-2The Truth Behind the Locals' Belief About the Gods.
3-43-4A Terrible Monster Worshipped as a God.
3-45-6A Terrible Danger That is Coming From Far Away.
5-61-2A Lost Race Who Secretly Manipulates the World.
5-63-4The Villains Are Even Worse Than They Seemed.
5-65-6A Prophecy of Great Import.
 
 
Height
source or inspiration: Tunnels & Trolls
 
This table is designed for humans - you'll probably want to adjust the results for other species.

You may also want to apply adjustments for gender.

The results in this table are more like modern people: people in medieval-like societies will generally be shorter.
For more medieval-like results, roll twice and take the lower result.
 
Roll 3 dice, use the total.
34 foot, or 120cm.
44' 3'' (4 foot 3 inches), or 130cm .
54' 5'', or 135cm.
64' 8'', or 140cm.
74' 10'', or 145cm.
85' 1'', or 155cm.
95' 3'', or 160cm.
105' 6'', or 165cm.
115' 8'', or 180cm.
125' 11'', or 180cm.
136' 1'', or 185cm.
146' 4'', or 195cm.
156' 6'', or 200cm.
166' 9'', or 205cm.
176' 11'', or 210cm.
187' 2'', or 220cm.
 
 
Weight
source or inspiration: Tunnels & Trolls
 
This table is designed for humans - you'll probably want to adjust the results for other species.

You may also want to apply adjustments for gender.

The results in this table are more like modern people: people in medieval-like societies will generally be lighter.
For more medieval-like results, roll twice and take the lower result.

If you're using both the height and weight charts, you could roll 4 dice:
base height on the first three dice, and weight on the last three.
This will mean that height and weight will be related.

For creatures that are inhumanly large or small, but have the same proportions, remember that the change in their weight will be more than the change in their height.
For example, a creature whose height, width and 'thickness' are all twice that of a human,
would have eight times as much body material as a human, not twice as much.
Of course, creatures like giants and fairies are impossible anyway, so you may choose to ignore this.
 
Roll 3 dice, use the total.
375lb (pounds), or 35kg (kilograms).
490lb, or 40kg.
5105lb, or 45kg.
6120lb, or 55kg.
7135lb, or 60kg.
8150lb, or 70kg.
9160lb, or 72.5kg.
10170lb, or 75kg.
11180lb, or 80kg.
12190lb, or 85kg.
13200lb, or 90kg.
14225lb, or 100kg.
15250lb, or 115kg.
16280lb, or 125kg.
17310lb, or 140kg.
18350lb, or 160kg.
 
 
Effect of Eating Unknown Fungi, Herbs etc
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2mildly poisonous - likely to make the person who eats them sick (optionally roll on the 'Diseases 2: Symptoms' table above).
1-23-4highly poisonous - may kill someone who eats them, or make them sick (optionally roll on the 'Diseases 2: Symptoms' table above).
1-25-6neither nutritious nor poisonous.
3-41-2nutritious - may be eaten immediately, but if eaten too long after it's picked it will be (roll again: 1-2 of no nutritional value 3-4 mildly poisonous 5-6 mildly or highly poisonous, depending on how long).
3-43-4nutritious - and will keep its value for a long time after being picked.
3-45-6mildly poisonous if not cooked. If cooked, it is nutritious - but if left too long, it will be (roll again: 1-2 of no nutritional value 3-4 mildly poisonous 5-6 mildly or highly poisonous, depending on how long).
5-61-2nutritious, and has a medical use. Roll on 'Medical Effects of Fungi, Herbs etc' below.
5-63-4has a medical use (roll on 'Medical Effects of Fungi, Herbs etc' below) but no food value.
5-65-6has a medical use (roll on 'Medical Effects of Fungi, Herbs etc' below), but eating too much may result in it being mildly or highly poisonous. No food value.
 
 
Medical Effects of Fungi, Herbs etc
source or inspiration: Monsters & Manuals
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2Calming. Roll two dice. The character is resistant to fear for that many hours.
1-23-4Deadens pain. Roll two dice. The character is resistant to pain for that many hours.
1-25-6Improves perception of magical effects. Roll two dice. The character is resistant to magical illusions for that many hours.
3-41-2As above, and the character's sight and hearing are also improved - or at least the character's ability to focus on them. As such they are less likely to wander into ambush, be unaware of someone sneaking up on them etc.
3-43-4Lowers blood flow. Roll 2 dice. The character needs less food and water, and poison will have a lesser effect, for that many hours. The character will however be sluggish and lethargic for the same priod of time.
3-45-6Lowers fatigue. The character can stay awake for up to 24 hours from when they last woke without suffering any ill effects. However after 18 hours they will have trouble concentrating, and after the 24 hours are up they are likely to fall asleep for 12 hours.
5-61-2Increases vigour. Roll 1 dice. The character is slightly stronger, more agile, can run faster and longer and so on for that many hours. However they are likely to be sluggish and lethargic until they next sleep.
5-63-4Improves natural healing. For the next two days the character will tend to get over illness and wounds more quickly.
5-65-6Gives a strange clarity. Roll 1 dice. The effects last for that many hours. The character will be less intelligent in general - but, strangely, will be more likely to notice when others are lying or concealing their true emotions.
 
 
What Are the Monsters Doing? 1: In Lair
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table is designed to decide what monsters are doing when the adventurers find them.
It's intended for intelligent monsters, rather than animal-like ones.
Use this table for monsters in their home/burrow/lair/nest/hive etc or the areas nearby that are their territory. Use the table below it for monsters that are encountered outside of their home territory.
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
1-21-21-2sleeping.
1-21-23-4having sex.
1-21-25-6arguing (roll again: 1 over their relationship 2 over politics 3 over religion 4 over money 5 over their status in the group 6 over a posession other than money).
1-23-41-2gambling with dice.
1-23-43-4gambling on a (roll again: 1-3 race 4-6 fight) between small animals (eg snails, rats).
1-23-45-6re-setting the area: winding up traps that've been sprung, removing adventurers' bodies, in less serious adventures putting in new treasure, and so on.
1-25-61-2two monsters are fighting (not to the death), a crowd is cheering them on (optionally roll again 1-3 they're also gambling on the results).
1-25-63-4two monsters are fighting to the death, a crowd is cheering them on.
1-25-65-6two monsters are fighting to the death, a crowd is trying to seperate them.
3-41-21-2they're meant to be on guard (roll again: 1-3 they're alert and guarding, 4 they're asleep 5-6 they're doing something else: roll again on this table). Optionally, roll on the 'Major Dungeon Locations' table below to see what they're meant to be guarding.
3-41-23-4trading.
3-41-25-6they're lost, and have set up a temporary camp/burrow etc.
3-43-41-2running away from another monster.
3-43-43-4roll again: 1-2 exercising 3-4 training for combat 5-6 sharpening weapons, polishing armour etc.
3-43-45-6performing a religious ceremony (roll again: 1 silent meditation 2 an animal sacrifice 3 a sacrifice of one of their own species 4 a sacrifice of an intelligent member of another species 5 a solemn ritual 6 a boisterous and ecstatic ritual).
3-45-61-2nothing - strangely, they appear to have simply been waiting for the adventurers to come along.
3-45-63-4the monsters are being punished eg peeling potatoes, scrubbing the floor with their bare hands.
3-45-65-6going to the toilet ('bathroom' for Americans).
5-61-21-2washing.
5-61-23-4one monster is telling a story to a group.
5-61-25-6one monster is lecturing a group. The group is (roll again: 1-2 openly bored and resentful 3-4 silent for fear of the larger monsters watching them 5 respectfully silent, alert and attentive 6 loudly enthusiastic).
5-63-41-2plotting against their rulers.
5-63-43-4playing sport.
5-63-45-6torturing (roll again: 1-2 a member of their own species 3-4 an intelligent member of another dungeon species 5 an intelligent member of a non-dungeon species 6 an animal).
5-65-61-2they appear to be dead, but spring to life when the adventurers enter the room.
5-65-63-4roll again: 1-2 eating 3 eating and getting drunk 4 getting drunk 5-6 getting drunk and fighting.
5-65-65-6waiting in ambush for whoever might come along.
 
 
What Are the Monsters Doing? 2: Wandering
source or inspiration: Mike Hensley
 
Some results are marked with an asterisk - *. This means that the GM should generate another monster or group of monsters, of appropriate power.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Returning to their lair after a fight (many of them will be wounded).
13-4Fighting with a creature or creatures of a different species *.
15-6Fighting amongst themselves (some of them will be wounded).
21-2Fighting another group of the same species *.
23-4Returning to their lair with a prisoner *.
25-6Returning to their lair with prey *.
31-2Returning to their lair with treasure (some of them might be wounded).
33-4Patrolling their territory.
35-6Hunting or gathering food.
41-2Chasing, or running away from, another creature or group of creatures (generate the other creature or group - the stronger side is chasing the weaker one) *.
43-4Building a new lair - digging a hole, setting up camp etc as appropriate.
45-6Sleeping - one or more of them are likely to be on guard, or sleeping lightly.
51-2They're lost.
53-4Looking for a place to sleep.
55-6Negotiating with another group of the same species *.
61-2Negotiating with a creature or creatures of a different species *.
63-4(roll again: 1-3 Going to 4-6 Returning from) a meeting with (roll again: 1-3 another group of the same species 4-6 a creature or creatures of a different species).
65-6Roll on the 'What Are the Monsters Doing? 1: In Lair' table above.
 
 
Major Dungeon Locations
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
These major locations may be the object of an adventure.

A dungeon may have more than one such location.

All these locations are likely to be heavily guarded, whether by creatures, traps, natural hazards, or more than one.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2The (roll again: 1-2 throne room 3-4 underground palace 5-6 underground gardens) of (roll again: 1-3 a human sorcerer 4-6 the most powerful of the monsters).
1-23-4Treasure room (roll again: 1 the treasury of an underground civilisation 2 the storehouse of a band of robbers 3-4 a temple; see below 5-6 a tomb).
1-25-6A temple where (roll again: 1 a forgotten god still waits for their worshippers 2-3 an evil cult from the surface secretly comes to worship 4 an alien has convinced the inhabitants of the dungeon that it is a god 5 an imprisoned lunatic is worshipped as a god 6 a fierce beast is worshipped as a god).
3-41-2An underground river, which leads (roll again: 1-2 out of the dungeon, 3 to an underground lake; see below 4 a secret cove; see below 5-6 to another major location - roll again on this table, ignoring another result of 'an underground river').
3-43-4An underground lake, with (roll again: 1 an ancient and powerful sea beast 2-3 a city of intelligent sea creatures beneath its surface 4 the ruins of a city beneath its surface - see 'the ruins of a lost city' below 5-6 an island in the middle, where adventurers may find...roll again on this table, ignoring the results of 'an underground lake', 'an underground river', or 'a secret cove').
3-45-6A (roll again: 1 demon 2 evil god/dess 3 evil sorcerer 4 as for three, but the sorcerer is also a former ruler 5 fierce ancient beast 6 mechanical creature created by a lost civilisation) is (roll again: 1-2 trapped in ice 3-4 held alive and captive by magic 5-6 sleeping, preserved by their own arts - roll again if the creature is an ancient beast).
5-61-2The ruins of a lost city, whose former inhabitants (roll again: 1-2 are now angry and vicious spirits 3-4 are trapped in eternal living death and crave release 5-6 are gone, but whose mechanical creations still wait for their return).
5-63-4A secret cove, leading to the open sea, where (roll again: 1-2 pirates have a hidden city 3-4 a cult from the surface comes to worship demons of the sea 5-6 refugees have built a place of safety).
5-65-6The ruined craft of advanced aliens (roll again: 1 the aliens are alive 2 only one alien is still alive 3 the aliens are dead, but their robots are still operating 4 the aliens are dead, but creatures they were transporting are still alive 5-6 the aliens are dead, but the craft itself is alive). Whoever is still alive (roll again: 1-2 is at war with the inhabitants of the dungeon 3 have/has enslaved many inhabitants of the dungeon 4 have/has recruited many inhabitants of the dungeon as an army of conquest 5-6 have/has convinced some of the inhabitants of the dungeon to worship them).
 
 
Magical Specialties
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Earth.
2Air.
3Fire.
4Water.
5roll again: 1-3 Metal 4-6 Wood.
6roll again 1-3 Light 4-6 Darkness.
 
 
Effects of Star Signs
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Fire Element will make the character braver and more confident, but also less sensible.
Earth Element will make the character practical and sensible, but also less confident in social situations.
Air Element will make the character a better communicator, but also tense and more prone to panic.
Water Element will make the character perform better in both physical and intellectual areas, but also worse in spiritual ones.

Cardinal Quality will make the character braver and more determined, but also less able to learn new things, or act as part of a team.
Fixed Quality will make the character more inclined to uphold the status quo.
Mutable Quality will make the character more adaptable, particularly in social situations, but also more unlucky and likely to attract problems.

Thanks to Wikipedia for the 'information' used in this table.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresultElementQuality
11-3AriesFireCardinal
14-6TaurusEarthFixed
21-3GeminiAirMutable
24-6CancerWaterCardinal
31-3LeoFireFixed
34-6VirgoEarthMutable
41-3LibraAirCardinal
44-6ScorpioWaterFixed
51-3SagittariusFireMutable
54-6CapricornEarthCardinal
61-3AquariusAirFixed
64-6PiscesWaterMutable
 
 
Effects of Birth Year
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Thanks to Wikipedia for the 'information' used in this table.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Rat makes a character more charismatic and shrewd, but also more obstinate (in game terms, less able to learn new things).
14-6Ox (sometimes Water Buffalo) makes a character calmer and more logical, but also more narrow-minded and materialistic (in game terms, less able to get on with those who are different from themselves, and more likely to be overcome by greed).
21-3Tiger makes a character braver and more powerful, but also more quick-tempered, and likely to be more generous than is good for them. It also makes a character more likely to oppose the current structure of their society.
24-6Rabbit (sometimes Cat) makes a character more gracious and soft-spoken (in game terms more charismatic, particularly in formal situations), but also likely to be moody (in game terms, likely to have random periods where they're less good at everything due to not putting enough effort in).
31-3Dragon makes a character stronger and more decisive, but also more likely to be dogmatic, tyrannical and over-bearing (in game terms, likely to offend people with different opinions, and in situations where the character has some power).
34-6Snake makes a character wise and mystical, but also a bad communicator.
41-3Horse makes a character more flexible (in game terms, better at learning new things) and intelligent, but also more gullible and anxious.
44-6Sheep (sometimes Goat) makes a character more creative and determined, but also more moody (in game terms, likely to have random periods where they're less good at everything due to not putting enough effort in). The character will also be more likely to seek a peaceful occupation than a violent one.
51-3Monkey makes a character more inventive (in game terms, better able to cope with unpredictable situations), but also more jealous and suspicious (in game terms, less able to form friendships with others, and more likely to see bad motives in others that aren't really there).
54-6Rooster makes a character more of a perfectionist. In game terms, if they can perform a task at all they're more likely than others to do a spectacular job, but tasks will also take them longer than most people (whether they succeed or not).
61-3Dog makes a character more sociable and intelligent, but also more quarrelsome and stubborn (in game terms, less able to learn new things).
64-6Pig (sometimes Wild Boar) makes a character braver and more intelligent, but also more gullible and materialistic (in game terms, more likely to be overcome by greed). The character will also be more likely to seek a peaceful occupation than a violent one.
 
 
Phobias
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
In every situation which triggers a phobia, characters with the phobia should have some chance of overcoming their fear. If your game includes attributes such as Intelligence, Wisdom, Willpower and/or Courage, these may be relevant to a character's chance of doing this.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Ablutophobia - fear of washing or bathing. If your game world is one in which most characters don't bathe anyway, the GM may re-roll.
14-6Aibohphobia - fear of anagrams (words which read the same backwards as forwards). Spells have a small chance (for example 1 in 6) of containing anagrams.
21-3Automatonophobia - Fear of anything that falsly represents a sentient being, such as ventriloquist's dummies or wax statues. The GM may re-roll in the case of creatures who are themselves automotons.
24-6Roll again:
1-3 Arachnopobia - fear of spiders. The GM may re-roll in the case of creatures who either live on spiders, or are themselves spider- or insect-like
4-6 Ophidiophobia - fear of snakes. The GM may re-roll in the case of creatures who either live on snakes, or are themselves snake- or lizard-like.
31-3Acrophobia - fear of heights. The GM should re-roll in the case of flying creatures.
34-6Astraphobia - fear of lightning and thunderstorms.
41-3Caligynephobia - Fear of beautiful women.
44-6Claustrophobia - fear of enclosed spaces. Dungeons are likely to contain such spaces. The phobia may also mean that the character can't wear helmets with visors, or suffers penalties when doing so. The GM may re-roll in the case of creatures who have evolved to live underground, for example dwarves and gnomes.
51-3Galeophobia - Fear of cats. The GM may re-roll in the case of creatures who either live on cats, or are themselves cat-like.
54-6Hylophobia - Fear of forests. The GM may re-roll in the case of creatures who have evolved to live in forests, for example (in some game worlds) elves.
61-3Xenophobia - fear of a specific, randomly determined intelligent species other than the character's own. If a particular species is very common in your game world (for example humans), it may be too harsh to give a character a phobia of that species. If so, the GM may decide not to have that species as one of the possible targets of xenophobia. Members of a species that the character is afraid of will find it easier to intimidate them, but harder to establish friendly relations.
64-6Triskaidekaphobia - Fear of the number thirteen (or of groups of thirteen things).
 
 
City Encounters: Day
source or inspiration: Basic Fantasy and Dungeons and Digressions
 
Roll 2 dice, use the total.
2Doppelganger: An inhuman creature who can take on the form of any person they've met.
3Noble: accompanied by at least 1 adult servant. Nobles may offer jobs to the heroes, or on the contrary if the characters have a bad reputation they may be ordered to leave town or even arrested. Nobles will be much more likely to ride than other characters.
4Roll again.
1-4 Thief or Thieves: roll 1 dice for how many. They will, obviously, attempt to appear to be something other than thieves: usually ordinary townsfolk, or sometimes beggars.
5 Roadside Gambling Game. Open to all. Roll again: On a 1-3 those hosting it are cheating.
6 Thieves' Market. All sorts of goods are available at about 30% cheaper than their normal price. However if the heroes stay, the GM should roll to see what happens: 1 suspected of being an informant or undercover guardsman 2 other customers attempt to steal from the heroes 3 the city guards raid the place and attempt to arrest everyone, including the heroes 4-6 no bad result.
5Thug or Thugs: roll 2 dice and subtract 2 for how many (obviously re-roll if the result is zero). Thugs will usually be armed, but will tend to conceal their weapons.
6City Guards: roll 2 dice for how many. They will often confront any 'suspicious-looking' characters. Whether the player characters count as 'suspicious-looking' will depend on the area. Roll again: on a 6, they conscript the heroes, and anyone else around, to help fight a fire.
7Merchant or Merchants: roll 1 dice. On a 1-3 there will be only 1 merchant. On a 4-6, roll again for how many. They have a 50% chance of being accompanied by (usually hired) warriors. Roll 1 dice for how many. Optionally, roll on the 'Merchants' subtable below.
8Roll again.
1-5 Beggar or Beggars. Roll 2 dice and subtract 2 for how many (obviously re-roll if the result is zero). Also roll 2 dice for their intentions; on a total of 2 or 4 (but not a 3), they're prepared to steal from those who refuse to give.
6 A huge crowd of beggars is rioting. The city guards will turn up in 10 minutes to an hour (1 dice x 10 minutes).
9Priest: Roll 1 dice and subtract 1. The priest will be accompanied by that many devout, but not priestly, companions OR roll on the 'Priests' subtable below.
10Mercenaries: Roll 2 dice for how many. Optionally, roll on the 'Mercenaries' subtable below.
11Wizard: roll 1 dice, and subtract 2 (count negative results as zero). The wizard will be accompanied by that many apprentices.
12Roll again.
1-3 Were-rats: were-rats can appear in human form, or the form of a giant rat. Depending on your game world, they may have been born human and been cursed by the bite of another were-rat, or they may be an actual species. Similarly, they may have the power to change their form at will, or it may be involuntary - for example, linked to phases of the moon. In human form they may appear 'rat-like', with darting eyes, a tendency to twitch their noses when under stress, and in the case of males a tendency towards long, thin mustaches. They may live in human- or rat-like conditions. Were-rats will generally not attack a group which is larger than them. Roll 1 dice and add 1 for how many wererats in a group. In their nests or homes, roll 2 dice and add 2.
4 An animal has escaped from the city zoo.
5 As above, but it's escaped from the gardens of an eccentric noble.
6 As above, but it's escaped from the laboratory of a wizard, and is (roll again: 1-2 the strange result of an experiment 3-4 a minor demon 5-6 a creature from another dimension).
 
 
City Encounters: Night
source or inspiration: Basic Fantasy and Dungeons and Digressions
 
Roll 2 dice, use the total.
2Doppelganger: An inhuman creature who can take on the form of any person they've met.
3Shadow: a living creature that appears to be made of shadow (but is solid and three-dimensional, although weightless). Roll 1 dice and add 2 for how many. Shadows generally lie in wait in dark places, waiting for prey to happen by. Their touch is intensely cold. Anyone killed by a shadow is likely to rise from the dead as a shadow themselves.
4Press Gang: A group of kidnappers, working for the local government, who conscript their victims into the army or navy. Roll 2 dice for how many there are in a group. They will usually not attack a larger group unless it's obviously drunk, weakened etc. They will often fight with their bare hands, or blunt weapons like clubs, but at least some are likely to carry daggers or swords in case they misjudge their victims and end up in a serious battle.
5Roll again.
1-5 Beggar or Beggars. Roll 2 dice and subtract 2 for how many (obviously re-roll if the result is zero). Also roll 2 dice for their intentions; on a 2 or 4 (but not a 3), they are prepared to steal from those who refuse to give.
6 A huge crowd of beggars is rioting. The city guards will turn up in 10 minutes to an hour (1 dice x 10 minutes).
6Roll again.
1-4 Thief or Thieves: roll 1 dice for how many. They will, obviously, attempt to appear to be something other than thieves: usually ordinary townsfolk, or sometimes beggars.
5 Roadside Gambling Game. Open to all. Roll again: On a 1-3 those hosting it are cheating.
6 Thieves' Market. All sorts of goods are available at about 30% cheaper than their normal price. However if the heroes stay, the GM should roll to see what happens: 1 suspected of being an informant or undercover guardsman 2 other customers attempt to steal from the heroes 3 the city guards raid the place and attempt to arrest everyone, including the heroes 4-6 no bad result.
7Thug or Thugs: roll 2 dice and subtract 2 for how many (obviously re-roll if the result is zero). Thugs will usually be armed, but will tend to conceal their weapons.
8Merchant or Merchants: roll 1 dice. On a 1-3 there will be only 1 merchant. On a 4-6, roll again for how many. They have a 50% chance of being accompanied by (usually hired) warriors. Roll 1 dice for how many. Optionally, roll on the 'Merchants' subtable below.
9Giant Rats: roll 3 dice for how many. Add 2 to the result if they're encountered in their nest. The bite of a giant rat can cause disease as well as wound.
10City Guards: roll 2 dice for how many. They will often confront any 'suspicious-looking' characters. Whether the player characters count as 'suspicious-looking' will depend on the area. Roll again: on a 6, they conscript the heroes, and anyone else around, to help fight a fire.
11Wizard: roll 1 dice, and subtract 2 (count negative results as zero). The wizard will be accompanied by that many apprentices.
12Roll again.
1-3 Were-rats: were-rats can appear in human form, or the form of a giant rat. Depending on your game world, they may have been born human and been cursed by the bite of another were-rat, or they may be an actual species. Similarly, they may have the power to change their form at will, or it may be involuntary - for example, linked to phases of the moon. In human form they may appear 'rat-like', with darting eyes, a tendency to twitch their noses when under stress, and in the case of males a tendency towards long, thin mustaches. They may live in human- or rat-like conditions. Were-rats will generally not attack a group which is larger than them. Roll 1 dice and add 1 for how many wererats in a group. In their nests or homes, roll 2 dice and add 2.
4 An animal has escaped from the city zoo.
5 As above, but it's escaped from the gardens of an eccentric noble.
6 As above, but it's escaped from the laboratory of a wizard, and is (roll again: 1-2 the strange result of an experiment 3-4 a minor demon 5-6 a creature from another dimension).
 
 
City Encounters: Sewers, table 1
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Nothing This part of the sewer system no longer carries anything.
2Storm Water Depending on the weather above ground, there might be a chance of flash floods.
3Sewerage The players will be far less effective, due to their revulsion for their surroundings. If an encounter with humans (or similar creatures) is rolled on the table below, there is a 50% chance that the players meet no-one instead.
4as above.
5Alchemical Waste For every hour that the players spend in this environment, they have a 1 in 6 chance of suffering some ill effect. If they do, they should roll on the 'Gas Clouds' table in the 'Dungeons and Combat' section (treat as if they 'failed to resist its effects' if relevant). If they actually wade in the waste, they have this chance for every 15 minutes. If an encounter with humans (or similar creatures) is rolled on the table below, the characters meet no-one instead.
6Magical Waste As above, but instead of suffering effects as of a gas cloud, the characters risk suffering the effects of a randomly-chosen spell: if the chosen spell is beneficial, nothing happens.
 
 
City Encounters: Sewers, table 2
source or inspiration: The Hobgoblin's Tavern
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
11-31-3A city guard. Roll again: 1-3 they're alone 4-5 there's another guard within shouting distance 6 there are 1-6 other guards within shouting distance. They're likely to have been sent down here as punishment.
11-34-6A specially-trained patrol of the city guard. Roll 1 dice for how many, counting a 1 as 2. They are likely to have 'thief'-type skills at a higher level than ordinary guards.
14-61-3A sewer worker, going about their job.
14-64-61-6 sewer workers, clearing a blockage.
21-31-3Illegal gladiatoral games (roll again: 1-3 involving animals 4-6 involving humans or other intelligent creatures).
21-34-6A giant slug.
24-61-3A lone thief (roll again: 1-2 going to a job 3-4 returning from a job 5-6 smuggling goods).
24-64-6A group of thieves. Roll 2 dice for how many (roll again: 1-2 going to a job 3-4 returning from a job 5 smuggling goods 6 about to murder one of their number).
31-31-3A pack of rats. Roll 6 dice for how many. The main danger from rats is catching a disease from their bites.
31-34-6A crocodile - descended from unwanted pets thrown into the sewers.
34-61-31-6 wild dogs (who may carry disease).
34-64-61-6 wild cats (who may carry disease).
41-31-3A giant spider, in its web. There is a 50% chance that the web will block the entire tunnel. Its web is sticky enough that it might entrap adventurers. It will burn fairly easily.
41-34-6A giant rat.
44-61-3A giant centipede.
44-64-6A water spirit (only encountered in storm water or sewerage. In sewerage, roll again: 1-5 evil due to the contaminated water 6 it bravely maintains a small area of pure water).
51-31-3Bats. Roll 3 dice for how many.
51-34-6Lurker Under the Surface. An octopus-like monster. It will flee from light.
54-61-3A corpse - human, or another intelligent species.
54-64-6A hole in the sewer wall (roll again: 1-3 made by thieves 4-6 made by the inhabitants of a dungeon).
61-31-3A cache of goods, hidden by thieves.
61-34-6The meeting-place of an evil cult (roll again: someone will be there on a 6).
64-61-3Were-rats' Nest: were-rats can appear in human form, or the form of a giant rat. Depending on your game world, they may have been born human and been cursed by the bite of another were-rat, or they may be an actual species. Similarly, they may have the power to change their form at will, or it may be involuntary - for example, linked to phases of the moon. In human form they may appear 'rat-like', with darting eyes, a tendency to twitch their noses when under stress, and in the case of males a tendency towards long, thin mustaches. They may live in human- or rat-like conditions. Were-rats will generally not attack a group which is larger than them. Roll 2 dice and add 2 for how many wererats are present..
64-64-6as above.
 
 
City Encounters subtable: Mercenaries
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
The GM might want to roll 2 dice to see how many mercenaries are in a group.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1They're drunk and looking for a fight.
2They're solemnly mourning dead companions (roll again: on a 1-4 they're drunk).
3One of them recognises one of the player characters (roll again: 1-2 as a friend 3-4 as an enemy 5 as a rival 6 as the person they're on a mission to capture) (roll again: 1-3 mistakenly 4-6 correctly).
4They're recruiting. They might accept the player characters, or even actively seek them out.
5They're looking for work. If the player characters are obviously adventurers, the mercenaries will ask them if they're hiring or know of any work.
6Two groups of mercenaries (roll for numbers for both groups) start fighting in the street (roll again: 1-2 the two groups fought on opposite sides in a recent war 3-4 they've fallen out over money 5-6 they've simply gotten into a drunken fight).
 
 
City Encounters subtable: Merchants
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
The GM might want to roll to see how many merchants there are. On a 1-3 there will be only 1 merchant. On a 4-6, roll 1 dice for how many.
In either case, they have a 50% chance of being accompanied by (usually hired) warriors. Roll 1 dice for how many.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1The player characters witness a merchant bribing a city guard.
2The player characters witness a thief stealing from a merchant.
3The merchant/s are arguing with a group of city guards. The guards are accusing the merchant/s of some crime.
4As above, but the merchant/s are accusing the city guard.
5The merchant/s need more guards. They might accept the player characters, or even actively seek them out. If they already have guards, roll again. On a 1-3, the existing guards will resent the newcomers.
6A merchant recognises one of the player characters (roll again: 1 as a friend 2 as an ex-employee 3 as an enemy 4 as the ex-employee of an enemy 5 as a rival 6 as the ex-employee of a rival) (roll again: 1-3 mistakenly 4-6 correctly).
 
 
City Encounters subtable: Priests
source or inspiration: Dungeons and Digressions
 
Roll 1 dice.
1A respectable priest seeks the help of someone like the heroes. Roll one dice and subtract one. They are accompanied by this many devout, but not priestly, followers.
2A belligerent priest, with 2 dice worth of devout, but not priestly followers, seeks 'donations' from passers-by.
3A ragged prophet seeks to incite a crowd to riot.
4A huge funeral procession. Roll again: on a 1-2 they're angry and looking for a fight.
5A riotous religious festival, with drunkenness and thievery abounding.
6An execution: 50% chance of being legal. The condemned is (roll again: 1-3 innocent 4 guilty 5 guilty, but had a good reason 6 guilty, but manipulated or tricked into it by another).
 
 
Campaign Ideas
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
This table is designed to generate an overall theme for a series of adventures.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Defenders - the players defend (roll again: 1-2 a city 3-4 an island 5-6 a band of refugees) from a series of threats.
2Exiles - the players have been exiled from their home, and wander the world looking for a way to return (roll again: 1-2 the heroes are a deposed lord, queen etc and his/her loyal allies 3-4 the heroes have been falsely accused of a crime 5 the heroes are refugees, after their home was over-run by monsters 6 as 5, but an evil ruler has taken control).
3The heroes have been chosen by a (roll again: 1-3 god 4-6 ruler) to carry out a series of quests and challenges, because (roll again: 1-3 they have angered him or her, 4-6 they are the only ones who are up to the task). The heroes seek to (1-3 complete the tasks 4-6 find a way to defeat the god/ruler).
4The heroes are in search of a powerful magic artifact, because it will (roll again: 1 rebuild a ruined society 2 help the rightful ruler recover their throne 3-4 heal the sick 5-6 drive away monsters).
5There is a war, which the heroes are trying to (roll again: 1-2 escape 3-4 win 5-6 stop).
6The players are explorers, travelling across (roll again: 1-2 a continent 3-4 a series of islands 5-6 a vast underworld).
 
 
Combining Magic Potions
source or inspiration: Dungeons and Dragons' Dungeon Masters Guide (1st edition)
 
This table gives the effect of mixing, or drinking, two magic potions of different kinds.
 
Roll 1 dice, then keep rolling if required.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3The potions explode
14-6The potions create a cloud of deadly gas
21-3The potions create a cloud of poisonous, but most likely not fatal, gas
24-6Neither potion has any effect
3no need to roll againOne potion (randomly determine which one) has its normal effect, the other has no effect
4no need to roll againBoth potions have half their normal effect
5no need to roll againBoth potions have their normal effect
61-3One potion (randomly determine which one) has no effect, the other has twice its normal effect
64-6Combining the potions makes a new effect, which is not the effect of either potion
 
 
Familiars: Species (British)
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This may be used to decide a wizard or witches' familiar.
Obviously this table should be modified in the case of animals which don't exist in your game world.
Optionally, the GM may make another roll to see if the familiar can talk: 1-3 yes 4-6 no.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3black cat.
14-6cat - roll on the 'Cat Colouring' table in the 'Personalising Characters' section for colouring.
21-3owl.
24-6crow.
31-3dog.
34-6frog.
41-3toad.
44-6roll again: 1-3 rabbit 4-6 hare.
51-3snake.
54-6roll again: 1-3 weasel 4-6 monkey.
61-3mouse.
64-6rat.
 
 
Familiars: Name (British)
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
1-21-21-2Black Jenkin (re-roll if the animal isn't black).
1-21-23-4Vinegar Tom.
1-21-25-6Grezzel Greedyguts.
1-23-41-2Piteous Mew (re-roll if the animal isn't a cat).
1-23-43-4Pyewacket.
1-23-45-6Bidd.
1-25-61-2Sack and Sugar.
1-25-63-4Oberon.
1-25-65-6Greymalkin.
3-41-21-2Elimanzer.
3-41-23-4Tom Twit.
3-41-25-6Pigwiggen.
3-43-41-2Robin Goodfellow.
3-43-43-4Brouny.
3-43-45-6Tibb.
3-45-61-2Great Browning.
3-45-63-4Little Browning.
3-45-65-6Ball.
5-61-21-2Peck in the Crown.
5-61-23-4Tom Tumbler.
5-61-25-6Tom Tit Tot.
5-63-41-2Puppet.
5-63-43-4Walliman.
5-63-45-6Fat Sack.
5-65-61-2Roll on the 'Titles of an Aristocratic Ruler' table in the 'Settlements and Countries' section, using (roll again: 1-3 the title of a male ruler, 4-6 the title of a female ruler).
5-65-63-4The familiar is named after a god or goddess in your game world.
5-65-65-6The familiar has a name that could be given to a human or other intelligent creature in your game world (you might want to roll on one of the 'Names:...' tables, in the 'Personalising Characters' section).
 
 
Familiars: Species (Egyptian)
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Optionally, the GM may make another roll to see if the familiar can talk: 1-3 yes 4-6 no.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1baboon.
2scorpion.
3scarab.
4snake.
5jackal.
6cat.
 
 
Familiars: Species (North American)
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Optionally, the GM may make another roll to see if the familiar can talk: 1-3 yes 4-6 no.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2coyote.
1-23-4raven.
1-25-6eagle.
3-41-2bear.
3-43-4fox.
3-45-6puma.
5-61-2rabbit.
5-63-4otter.
5-65-6wolf.
 
 
Familiars: Species (Australian)
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Optionally, the GM may make another roll to see if the familiar can talk: 1-3 yes 4-6 no.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1dingo.
2wombat.
3platypus.
4kookaburra.
5echidna.
6lizard.
 
 
Cat Colouring
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2black.
1-23-4white.
1-25-6grey.
3-41-2orange.
3-43-4tortoiseshell (black and orange patches).
3-45-6paws, chest, and lower face white - upper face, ears, legs, back and tail are (roll again: 1-2 black 3 grey 4 orange 5-6 tortiseshell).
5-61-2van - ears and tail are (roll again: 1-2 black 3 grey 4 orange 5-6 tortiseshell), rest of the body is white.
5-63-4tabby - light grey and dark grey-black stripes.
5-65-6paws, chest and lower face white - upper face, ears, legs, back and tail are tabby.
 
 
Titles of an Aristocratic Ruler
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Dictatorial rulers may have religious or military titles as well as, or instead of, the aristocratic titles here.

Areas may have names which are based on their past rather than their present situation. For example, a county might no longer have a count.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceTitle if MaleTitle if FemaleTitle of Territory
11-4KingQueenKingdom
15-6ViceroyVicereineViceroyalty [note: a Viceroy or Vicereine is a royal official who runs a country or province in the name of and as representative of a monarch. However many such may be independent in practice, or have gained independence but kept the title]
21-2EmperorEmpressEmpire
23-4DukeDuchessDuchy
25-6Grand DukeGrand DuchessGrand Duchy
31-2BaronBaronessBarony
33-4PrincePrincessRoll again: 1-3 Principality 4-6 Princely State
35-6MarquisMarquiseroll again: 1-2 Marquessate 3-4 Margraviate 5-6 March
41-2CountCountessCounty
43-4Caliph [this is also a religious title - roll again if necessary]none - roll againCaliphate
45-6SultanSultanaSultanate
51-3Emir [this is also a military title - roll again if necessary]none - roll againEmirate
54-6SheikhSheikhahSheikdom
61-2Khanroll again: 1-2 Khatun 3-4 Khatan 5-6 KhanumKhanate
63-4roll again: 1-3 Rajah 4-6 Maharajahroll again: 1-3 Rani 4-6 MaharaniRajahdom (never Maharajadom)
 
 
Nicknames of a Ruler
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
These names are used with the ruler's name - for example 'Harald Barelegs' rather than just 'Barelegs'.

These names are often given after a ruler's death. A ruler may have one such name during their life, and another after their death.

The nickname will reflect beliefs about the ruler, but not necessarily the truth.

In all cases, feel free to re-roll if the title doesn't fit your ideas about the ruler (or just pick the most appropriate from the list).
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Barelegs.
12Bluetooth.
13Forkbeard (re-roll for female rulers).
14Harefoot.
15Ironside.
16Lackland.
21Longshanks.
22the Blessed.
23the Bloody.
24the Boneless (usually means that the ruler was born with a disability).
25the Child.
26the Confessor (implies that the ruler is highly revered within a particular ideology, especially a religion, but didn't die for that cause).
31the Conquerer.
32the Elder (implies that there was another ruler with the same name, who was styled 'the Younger').
33the Fair.
34the Far-Travelled.
35the Good.
36the Great.
41the Harelipped.
42the Just.
43the Lame.
44the Liberator.
45the Lionheart.
46the Lisp.
51the Lucky.
52the Magnificent.
53the Martyr (implies that the ruler died for a cause, especially a religion).
54the Old.
55roll again: 1-2 the Peaceful 3-4 the Peaceable 5-6 the Peace-Maker.
56the Red (ie red-haired).
61the Tall.
62the Terrible (in the sense of 'brutal', not 'incompetent').
63the Treasurer.
64the Unready.
65the Victorious.
66the Younger (implies that there was another ruler with the same name, who was styled 'the Elder').
 
 
Titles of a High-Ranking Priest
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
If only one title is listed, use it for both men and women. If two, the first is used for men and the second for women.

Those who hold these titles may have political power in the wider world as well as within their church.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Patriarch / Matriarch.
14-6High Priest / High Priestess.
21-3Chief Rabbi.
24-6Archbishop.
31-3Pontifex Maximus.
34-6Abbott / Abbess.
41-3Hegumen / Hegumenia.
44-6Imam.
51-3Mullah.
54-6roll again: 1-3 Mufti 4-6 Grand Mufti.
61-3Lama.
64-6Guru.
 
 
Titles of an Educated Person
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
In many societies there may be a tendency for learned people to also have priestly positions, and vice versa.

In some, priests may be the only educated people (including the rulers) - in such societies, there will probably be no titles for educated people seperate to titles for priests.

There may be a similar overlap between educated people and magicians.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2scholar.
1-23-4scribe.
1-25-6pandit.
3-41-2scrivener.
3-43-4magister.
3-45-6professor.
5-61-2rector.
5-63-4doctor.
5-65-6provost.
 
 
Shield Designs
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table can also be used for flags.
Roll for the design, then roll for the two colours (or one colour in the case of the last design) on the 'Colours' table below (if the same colour is rolled twice, re-roll the second one).
To see if the shield has an emblem, roll again: 1-3 yes (roll on the Emblems table below) 4-6 no.

Thanks to Wikipedia for the shield pictures.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2
13-4
15-6
21-2
23-4
25-6
31-2
33-4
35-6
41-2
43-4
45-6
51-2
53-4
55-6
61-2
63-4
65-6
 
 
Colours
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
In European heraldry, colours distinguished different groups. For example, a lion on a red background would represent a different family to a lion on a white background.
In Japanese heraldry, only the emblem mattered - it could appear on any colour.

This table doesn't take account of the rules of European heraldry relating to which colours could be placed next to each other.

The GM may roll only once, for the background colour to be used on flags, shields etc, and assume that the emblem is black or white. Or they may roll twice, re-rolling if they get the same result, with the first result being the background colour and the second being the emblem colour
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3red.
14-6orange.
21-3yellow.
24-6light green.
31-3dark green.
34-6light blue.
41-3dark blue.
44-6purple.
51-3black.
54-6white.
61-3grey.
64-6brown.
 
 
Emblems
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
For coats of arms, emblems of a city, tribal totems and so on.

Obviously this table should be modified in the case of animals which don't exist in your game world.

Optionally, the GM may roll to see how the emblem is coloured: 1-3 the item is coloured 'proper'; that is, it's coloured like a real example of whatever it is (for example a tree might have green leaves and brown bark) 4-6 roll on the Colours table above, re-rolling if the emblem appears on a flag or shield and the colour rolled for the emblem is the same as a colour on the flag or shield.

In real life, tribal totems were always animals. If rolling for a tribal totem, the GM may want to re-roll if the result is an object.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11flower.
12castle.
13eagle (roll again: 1 head only, facing left 2 head only, facing right 3-4 whole body, 'standing' with wings outspread, head facing left, 5-6 as for 3-4, but head facing right).
14lion (roll again on Table B below).
15dragon (roll again on Table B below).
16bull (roll again on Table B below).
21cow (roll again on table B below, but cows are always on all fours, never 'rampant').
22man (roll again 1-2 nude, 3-4 clothed, 5-6 armoured, and roll on Table B below. A 'head only' which is 'clothed' is wearing a hat).
23woman (roll again as above).
24jaguar (roll again on Table B below).
25crocodile (roll again on Table B below).
26bear (roll again on Table B below).
31sun (roll again: 1-3 full sun 4-6 rising sun)(roll again: 1-3 with a human face 4-6 without)(roll again: 1-3 with rays 4-6 without).
32moon (roll again: 1-3 full moon 4-6 crescent moon)(roll again: 1-3 with a human face 4-6 without).
33star.
34doe (a deer, a female deer) (roll again on Table B below).
35hart ie a male deer (roll again on Table B below).
36crane (roll again on Table B below).
41horse (roll again on Table B below, and if the horse is coloured 'proper', optionally roll on the Horse Colour table).
42crown.
43sword.
44eye.
45wheatsheaf.
46coin.
51tree (roll again 1-2 bare of leaves, 3-4 with leaves 5-6 with leaves and bearing fruit).
52butterfly, whole body, facing the viewer.
53leaf.
54set of scales.
55peacock, whole body, facing the viewer.
56mountain.
61roll again: 1-3 fish, whole body 4-6 dolphin, whole body. For either, roll again: 1-3 facing left 4-6 facing right.
62fan.
63hand (roll again 1-3 bare 4-6 gloved).
64roll again: 1-3 crab, 4-6 scarab beetle. In either case it's the whole body, seen from above.
65Roll again ignoring this result or the one below - but the emblem is two of whatever the result is, side by side (if you have to make extra rolls the results will be for the one on the left, and the one on the right will be a mirror image).
66Roll again ignoring this result or the one above - but the emblem is three of whatever the result is, arranged in a vertical line (make any further rolls as directed - the results will apply to all three).
 
 
Emblems Table B
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll on this table if directed to on the one above.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Head only, facing left.
2Head only, facing right.
3Head only, facing towards the viewer.
4Whole body, facing left (roll again: 1-3 on all fours, 4-6 'rampant' ie on its hind legs).
5Whole body, facing right (roll again as above).
6Whole body, facing towards the viewer (roll again as above).
 
 
Languages 1: Letters
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Most characters (in the sense of 'letters') represent a word. They may also be used to represent syllables to spell words which have no character of their own. Characters are recognisable, even to people who don't read the language, as pictures of the word they represent. Example - Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics.
2As above, except that the characters aren't recognisable as pictures of the word they represent. The characters may once have been recognisable, and have become more abstract over time.
3Characters represent syllables. For example, 'basic' would be written with two characters ('bay','sick').
4As above.
5Characters mostly represent phonemes (basic sounds), but only consonants are represented (ie not a, e, i, o or u). For example, 'basic' would be written with three characters ('b', 's', 'c'). 'sick', 'sack' and 'sock' would all be written the same way.
6As above, but both vowels and consonants are represented. English and other European languages work this way.
 
 
Languages 2: Writing Direction
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Left to right, starting a new row under the old one - as in English and other European languages.
2as above.
3Right to left, starting a new row under the old one - as in Hebrew.
4Top to bottom, starting a new row to the left of the old one - as in classical Chinese.
5Top to bottom, starting a new row to the right of the old one.
6Boustrophedon: Right to left, then starting a new row under the old one which goes left to right, then right to left again and so on, so that the writing is in one continuous line.
 
 
Dungeon Entrances
source or inspiration: AEG's 'Toolbox'.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Under a castle - entered via (Roll again: 1-2 a secret room 3-4 a trapdoor in a cellar 5-6 a hidden staircase) (Roll again: 1-3 unknown to the current occupants of the castle 4 the castle was deserted after its owner died 5 the castle was deserted after its owner disappeared 6 at least one of the current occupants of the castle is aware of the entrance).
13-4Under a castle - entrance is exposed by accident (eg an earthquake, rotten floorboards, a child is exploring and goes missing).
15-6Under a town or city - entrance is exposed by accident as above.
21-2Under a town or city - entered via the sewer system.
23-4Under a town or city - entered via (Roll again: 1-2 a secret room 3-4 a trapdoor in a cellar 5-6 a hidden staircase) in a private house. (Roll again: 1-3 unknown to the current occupants of the building 4 the building is empty after its owner died 5 the buiding is empty after its owner disappeared 6 at least one of the current occupants of the building are aware of the entrance).
25-6Under a town or city - entered via a secret door in a public building.
31-2The dungeon is inside the body of a giant animal.
33-4Via an animal lair.
35-6In an abandoned mine.
41-2Via a staircase in a hollowed-out tree.
43-4Extensions to a mine accidentally uncover the dungeon.
45-6Extensions to an underground home eg of a reclusive sorcerer, or dwarves, accidentally uncover the dungeon.
51-2In an extinct volcano.
53-4Roll again: 1-3 A secret cave that can only be entered via the water 4-6 Behind a waterfall.
55-6The dungeon is on another plane of existence, and can only be entered and exited by magical means.
61-2The occupants or owner of the dungeon have created a highly visible entrance, in order to attract adventurers to their doom.
63-4Roll again, ignoring this result - but the entrance is used by an evil cult as a means of sacrificing people.
65-6Roll again, ignoring this result - but the locals will happily point adventurers to the dungeon entrance, as they gain quite a lot of their income from equipping adventurers, acting as guides etc.
 
 
Dungeon Doors
source or inspiration: Al Krombach
 
You can roll for individual doors, or once for an entire area (eg once for the whole dungeon, or once for each level).
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Oak.
12Pine.
13Teak.
14Yew.
15Ash.
16Plywood.
21Steel.
22Iron (roll again: 1-2 gleaming 3-4 dull 5-6 dull and rusty).
23Copper.
24Tin.
25Brass.
26Pewter.
31Lead.
32Granite.
33Limestone.
34Basalt.
35Marble.
36Obsidian.
41Glass.
42Sandstone.
43Leather.
44Bone.
45Cardboard.
46Recycled Shields.
51Book Covers.
52Animal Skin. Optionally roll again: 1-2 fur 3 hairy 4 human skin 5-6 lizard skin.
53Boulders.
54Curtain.
55Tapestry.
56Loose Bricks.
61Sheet of Flames.
62Ice.
63Waterfall.
64Smoke.
65Roll again, but the door is an illusion.
66Roll on the 'Precious and Semi-Precious Stones' table in the 'Treasure' section.
 
 
Dungeon Floors
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
You can roll for individual rooms or corridors, or once for an entire area (eg once for the whole dungeon, or once for each level).

If you get more than one 'knee-deep' result, the dungeon is knee-deep in a mixture of whatever you rolled.

Several results have symbols in brackets in front of them. These are for if you're going to use the 'Dungeon Smells' table below.
(*) roll again: 1-3 the dungeon smells of cinnamon and other spices 4-6 roll on the 'Dungeon Smells' table
(+) roll again: 1-2 smells of wood 3-4 roll on the 'Dungeon Smells' table 5-6 roll on the 'Dungeon Smells' table - the dungeon smells of the result and wood.
(%) roll again: 1-3 the coral is damp, and the dungeon smells of the sea 4-6 the coral is dry - roll on the 'Dungeon Smells' table
(&) roll again: 1-2 dirt 3-4 roll on 'Dungeon Smells' 5-6 a mixture of dirt, and a roll on 'Dungeon Smells'
(^) roll again:
1-2 an overpowering smell of death. Ignore the result from any other symbol, including (#)
3-4 the bones have no smell. Use the result for any other symbol you rolled, or if there wasn't one roll on 'Dungeon Smells'
5-6 a faint odour of decay. Combine with the result from any other symbols you rolled. If there aren't any, roll on 'Dungeon Smells' and combine with that.
(#) The dungeon will smell like the sea, a swamp, wine or blood depending on the extra roll. Ignore results from any other symbols, except any result from bones.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Brick.
13-4(*) Marble.
15-6(*) Gold.
21-2(*) Silver.
23-4(+) Wood.
25-6Rock.
31-2The floor, walls and roof of the dungeon are all mirrors. Hiding and sneaking will be far more difficult (assuming that the character is trying to avoid the attention of a creature who can't see because of the dungeon's light levels, or who relies on sight rather than another sense).
33-4Rubber.
35-6Clay.
41-2Smooth stone.
43-4Ice (for a more 'realistic' dungeon, re-roll unless the dungeon is freezing or colder. For a more traditional dungeon, the ice will magically not melt regardless of the temperature). The floor will be very slippery.
45-6The floors are smooth, obviously constructed rather than natural, and made of a material which the heroes have never seen before.
51-2(%) Coral.
53-4Sand.
55-6(&) Dirt.
61-2Roll again, ignoring this result - but the area is knee-deep in dead insects.
63-4(^) Roll again, ignoring this result - but the area is knee-deep in a mixture of human and non-human bones.
65-6(#) Roll again, ignoring this result - but the area is knee deep in (roll again: 1-2 clear water 3-4 foul, cloudy water 5 wine 6 blood).
 
 
Dungeon Smells
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
You can roll for individual rooms or corridors, or once for an entire area (eg once for the whole dungeon, or once for each level).
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3rotting vegetation.
14-6pine leaves.
21-3freshly-baked bread.
24-6ashes.
31-3urine.
34-6the sea.
41-3manure.
44-6mould.
51-3a mixture of dirt and mushrooms.
54-6an indescribable, but horrible smell.
61-3damp earth.
64-6cinnamon and other spices.
 
 
Stupid Laws
source or inspiration: Eric Cartlock
Thanks to RPGPundit and Forward...to Adventure!
 
Roll 2 dice, use the total.
2You must peace knot your weapons, and your shoelaces.
3You must visit the leader of the settlement and show him your exposed backside, bending over. He will kick you in the rump three times to ensure you're not smuggling any illicit items.
4You can't be on the streets during the waxing of the moon after last bells. The fine is being locked up and the next day pranced around town with coloured ribbons to ward the evil spirits from your body.
5Wineskins must have wine in them. If they don't you're forced to burn them. Also 'iron rations' must have a small ingot of iron in them or they're confiscated. Regular rations are excepted.
6You must be polite to the guards. Any sass and you get a demerit shaped in the form of a round sharp and worn coin to be hung around the neck. Six of them and you have to scrub the local farmers yeast fermenter who supplies the local tavern. 12 and you must marry one of his less marriageable relatives in restitution. The farmer is the mayor and formed the town.
7All weapons must be named. The name must be etched or otherwise inscribed upon the blade or hilt. Non named weapons must have them etched or engraved by the local blacksmith for a fee of 1d6 silver coins.
8Drinking inside the tavern is not permitted. People intending to drink must do so near the 'Puke bowl', a giant round shaped bowl that is the town square. Puking inside the tavern earns a night in the bowl. The bowl is cleaned out once a day and the leavings used as compost. The bar owner has such foul beer that on the first drink typically one must puke. People who are caught during the waxing of the moon are paraded around the puke bowl.
9If you are an outsider to the town you must wear a funny pointed hat that says 'Outsider'. You might get pelted by tomatoes.
10If you pass over the same bridge in the same direction twice, youre forced to leave town (as it's considered to bring bad luck).
11Of each group of strangers, the guards at the gate let all but one person in. The remaining person must camp outside.
12Players must speak always in the form of questions when bartering for goods in town. If a player breaks this rule before the person selling the goods they must leave the building. The town typically sells the best weapons and armour, claming only crafty people are able to wield the best of gear.
 
 
Age
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Child (less than 10).
2Youth (11-19).
3Young Adult (20s).
4Adult (30s).
5Middle-Aged (40s).
6Elderly (50s or older).
 
 
Appearance
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll on this table 1-3 times.
If two rolls cancel each other out, ignore both rolls, and roll them again.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Bald.
12Beautiful.
13Big Nose.
14Blind.
15Broad.
16Clean.
21Clumsy.
22Deaf.
23Dextrous.
24Dirty.
25Eagle-Eyed.
26Fat.
31Hairy.
32Handsome.
33Keen Hearing.
34Long-Haired.
35Nondescript.
36One-Eyed.
41One-Handed.
42One-Legged.
43Plain.
44Powerful.
45Puny.
46Short.
51Short-Sighted.
52Spotty.
53Stocky.
54Strong.
55Stuttering.
56Tall.
61Thin.
62Ugly.
63Unkempt.
64Weak.
65Young-Looking.
66Wrinkled.
 
 
Personality
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll on this table 1-3 times.
If two rolls cancel each other out, roll a dice:
1-3 Ignore both rolls, and roll them again.
4-6 The character's personality flips from one to the other at random.

If you get the result 'a collector', roll again:
1-3 they collect anything and everything
4-6 they collect something specific: roll yet again:
1 Coins 2 Books 3 Legends and Tales 4 Weapons 5 Art 6 Jewels
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Arrogant.
12Brave.
13Cheeky.
14Cheerful.
15Clever.
16A collector (see note above).
21Cowardly.
22Dishonest.
23A dreamer.
24Dull.
25Flamboyant.
26Forceful.
31Greedy.
32Happy.
33Hard Working.
34Honest.
35Humble.
36Intellectual.
41Jealous.
42A liar.
43Mean.
44Paranoid.
45Religious.
46Rude.
51Scheming.
52Sensible.
53Silly.
54Soft-Hearted.
55Spendthrift.
56Stupid.
61Suspicious.
62Trusting.
63Truthful.
64Unhappy.
65Violent.
66Youthful.
 
 
Fantasy Plots
source or inspiration: Stan Taylor
Thanks to RPGPundit and Forward...to Adventure!
 
How to Use This Table:
Roll 1 dice to get the basic structure. Then, for each bold letter (A, B etc), roll on another table:
A Powerful Figures
B Groups
C Goals
D Bad Outcomes
E Mysterious Figures

Of course you can just roll on an individual table if you just want a goal, group etc.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Suddenly, A appears with B, demanding that you C. Otherwise, D. You will have to get past E.
2Unexpectedly, A has teamed up with E. Now they're trying to C.
3Your area has been surrounded by B. Rumors say that A is approaching.
4The oracle predicted that D. Now it is coming true and only E knows why.
5If you fight through B to C, A has a reward for you.
6roll again.
 
 
A: Powerful Figures
source or inspiration: Stan Taylor
Thanks to RPGPundit and Forward...to Adventure!
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11a barbarian druid.
12a foreign diplomat.
13a long dead hero.
14a reader of the dead.
15an inquisitor.
16the prince of thieves.
21a child king.
22a hag.
23a mummified king.
24a telepath.
25an ogre warlord.
26the River Walker.
31a demon.
32a rogue-wizard from the sea.
33a paladin.
34a vampire.
35the dean of the wizard academy.
36the royal executioner.
41a Dwarven runemaster.
42a holy healer.
43a prince.
44a wizard.
45the goblin king.
46the sheriff .
51a famous bard.
52a lich.
53a princess.
54an angel.
55the head archivist.
56one of the characters feudal lord.
61a fire mage.
62a lightning lord.
63a prophet.
64an Elven sage.
65the last of an ancient dynasty.
66one of the characters former master.
 
 
B: Groups
source or inspiration: Stan Taylor
Thanks to RPGPundit and Forward...to Adventure!
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11a pack of wolves.
12bugbears.
13giant bats.
14hobgoblins.
15orcs.
16slavers.
21a tribe of centaurs.
22cliff dwelling spies .
23giant rats.
24holy monks.
25pirates.
26stealthy assassins.
31adventurers.
32crows.
33gnolls .
34horse nomads.
35pixie warriors.
36stirges.
41airship men.
42Dwarven axe fighters.
43gnome inventors .
44kobold guerilla fighters.
45ratmen.
46uplifted animals.
51apemen.
52elven archers.
53goblins.
54lizardmen.
55rogue knights.
56winged warriors.
61barbarians.
62ghouls.
63Halfling acrobats.
64mercenaries.
65skeletons.
66zombies.
 
 
C: Goals
source or inspiration: Stan Taylor
Thanks to RPGPundit and Forward...to Adventure!
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11blaze a new trail through the forbidden forest.
12escort a diplomat to the Sunset Kingdom.
13fulfill the seer's prophecy.
14lead an army through the mountains.
15rescue the prisoners before the cave ceases to exist.
16stop the giant oozes.
21bring back the biggest gem from the mine.
22find out why the lake disappeared.
23gather tribute for the dragon.
24navigate the Path of Traps.
25reset the Clock of Time.
26stop the invading army.
31bring the children back from the Twisted Lands.
32find the lost treasure horde.
33go through the Crack in Reality.
34negotiate with the kidnappers' guild.
35retrieve a sword from a tomb.
36stop the royal duel.
41close the gate to another dimension.
42find the source of the ghost fog.
43hunt down a Tyrannosaurus.
44raise a witch from the dead.
45retrieve gypsy flowers from Jungle Island.
46stop what's terrorizing the miners.
51defend the tomb complex from plunderers.
52find who built the new tunnels.
53investigate the tower that has risen from the swamp.
54rebuild the bridge to the Post Lands.
55spend the night in the center of the necropolis.
56take over the kingdom.
61determine which of the imposters is real.
62free the bandit king.
63kill a holy man.
64recover the royal crown before the coronation.
65stop a funeral.
66win the deadliest scavenger hunt.
 
 
D: Bad Outcomes
source or inspiration: Stan Taylor
Thanks to RPGPundit and Forward...to Adventure!
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11a plague will spread through the land.
12it will never rain again.
13the earthquakes will get worse.
14the palace will be uninhabitable.
15there will be no summer.
16you will never have a decent haircut again.
21all marriages will be annulled.
22No one will ever sleep again.
23the Eternal Tornado will not leave the kingdom.
24the poison will be irreversible.
25wild magic will spread.
26you will turn into beasts.
31cattle raids will continue.
32random people will keep dying.
33the floating city will crash.
34The queen's crystal heart will shatter.
35you must stand in for the sacrifice.
36you'll never find love.
41elves and dwarves will go to war.
42snails will rain down on the land.
43the forest will burn down.
44the sewers will back up and ruin the city.
45you will always have a monkey on your back.
46your families will be eaten.
51Everyone in the city will die.
52spells will stop working.
53The Groan will return.
54the temple will collapse.
55you will be trapped underground.
56your gender will stay switched.
61everyone over 30 will turn to stone.
62the dead will keep rising.
63the guilds will leave the land.
64the witches' curse will grow stronger.
65you will die on your next birthday.
66your location will never be returned to the real world.
 
 
E: Mysterious Figures
source or inspiration: Stan Taylor
Thanks to RPGPundit and Forward...to Adventure!
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11a band of trolls.
12a Dragon.
13a lab of gargoyles.
14a stone walker.
15an unsolvable puzzle.
16the medusa enclave.
21a burrowing landshark.
22a family of manticores.
23a lion immune to magic.
24a tribe of Deep Ones.
25an unspeakable taboo.
26the minotaur battle group.
31a cabal of serpent men.
32a giant.
33a mad inventor's creation.
34an ancient basilisk.
35the dog-prince.
36the shadow creature.
41a chaos creature.
42a giant python.
43a pack of owlbears.
44an animated tree.
45the hanged man.
46the Thieves' Guild.
51a cloaked figure.
52a giant spider.
53a resurrected wizard.
54an elemental.
55the hero's twin.
56the walking castle.
61a Djinn.
62a golem.
63a sphinx.
64an invisible slayer.
65the illusion master.
66one of the characters' evil uncle.
 
 
Mystic Place Names: Basic Structure
source or inspiration: Abulafia, under the terms of their Creative Commons license.
 
How to Use This Table:
Roll 1 dice to get the basic plot structure. Then, for each bold letter (A,B, or C) roll on the relevant table below
 
Roll 1 dice.
1-2The B of C.
3-4The A B.
5-6The A B of C.
 
 
Mystic Place Names A
source or inspiration: Abulafia, under the terms of their Creative Commons license
and Al Krombach.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Black.
13-4Bloody.
15-6Bright.
21-2Burning.
23-4Dead.
25-6Elder.
31-2Eternal.
33-4Forgotten.
35-6Golden.
41-2Living.
43-4Lost.
45-6Petrified.
51-2Shining.
53-4Silver.
55-6Sunken.
61-2Undying.
63-4White.
65-6Wondrous.
 
 
Mystic Place Names B
source or inspiration: Abulafia, under the terms of their Creative Commons license
and Al Krombach.
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
11-21-2Arena.
11-23-4Baths.
11-25-6Castle.
13-41-2Catacombs.
13-43-4Caverns.
13-45-6Chamber.
15-61-2Chasm.
15-63-4City.
15-65-6Coast.
21-21-2Crypt.
21-23-4Desert.
21-25-6Door.
23-41-2Forest.
23-43-4Fortress.
23-45-6Fountain.
25-61-2Gallery.
25-63-4Garden.
25-65-6Gardens.
31-21-2Gate.
31-23-4Grotto.
31-25-6Grove.
33-41-2Hall.
33-43-4Harem.
33-45-6Isle.
35-61-2Jungle.
35-63-4Labyrinth.
35-65-6Lake.
41-21-2Mansion.
41-23-4Marsh.
41-25-6Maze.
43-41-2Mine.
43-43-4Mire.
43-45-6Monastery.
45-61-2Mountain.
45-63-4Museum.
45-65-6Ocean.
51-21-2Pillar.
51-23-4Pit.
51-25-6Pool.
53-41-2Portal.
53-43-4Prison.
53-45-6River.
55-61-2Ruins.
55-63-4Sea.
55-65-6Shrine.
61-21-2Spire.
61-23-4Stair.
61-25-6Swamp.
63-41-2Temple.
63-43-4Tomb.
63-45-6Tower.
65-61-2Valley.
65-63-4Well.
65-65-6Wellspring.
 
 
Mystic Place Names C
source or inspiration: Abulafia, under the terms of their Creative Commons license.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11the Abyss.
12Blood.
13Bronze.
14Dawn.
15the Dead.
16Doom.
21Dragons.
22Dread.
23Dust.
24Eternal Peril.
25Fire.
26Flame.
31Frost.
32the Gods.
33Gold.
34Heaven.
35Ice.
36the Inferno.
41Iron.
42Lightning.
43Maps Edge.
44Mists.
45Mithril.
46No Return.
51Runes.
52Scales.
53the Seven.
54Shadow.
55Silver.
56Skulls.
61the Sky.
62Stone.
63Swords.
64Thunder.
65Wind.
66Youth.
 
 
Plot Elements
source or inspiration: The Big List of RPG Plots
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11The heroes must work with a character or group who are normally rivals or villains.
12The heroes must work with a character who is supposedly an expert, but actually does more harm than good.
13The victims turn out to be villains, and vice versa.
14The heroes meet others who can help them, but won't unless the heroes agree to help them with their own aims.
15The villain is someone that some or all of the heroes like and respect.
16One of the heroes will fall in love with the villain.
21The heroes must succeed (roll again: 1-3 without violence 4-6 with special discretion).
22The heroes must succeed without access to powers, equipment, or other resources they're used to having.
23Another group comparable to the heroes has already failed, their (roll again: 1-2 corpses 3-4 journal 5-6 equipment) provide(s) clues to help the heroes do better.
24There are innocents nearby that the heroes must keep safe while dealing with the adventure.
25The adventure begins without warning or buildup; the heroes are tossed into the fire of action in scene one.
26The heroes must pretend to be someone else.
31The heroes must pretend to have very different allegiances.
32The heroes must choose which evil to thwart and which to let thrive.
33The heroes must choose which innocents to rescue and which to abandon.
34The heroes aren't asked to solve the problem, just to render aid against a backdrop of larger trouble.
35One of the heroes (roll again: 1-3 turns out to be 4-6 is mistaken for) the (roll again: 1-3 fulfillment of a prophecy 4-6 heir to the throne).
36There is another group of characters similar to the heroes 'competing' on the same adventure, with very different goals for the outcome.
41The heroes must assemble and train a force to do the job with them.
42The heroes are working with flawed information; the adventure area isn't as described.
43The heroes take shelter in a place which turns out to be the source of their danger.
44The heroes must win the support of hostile people in order to survive.
45A villain turns out to have a hold over one or all of the heroes.
46A prized object turns out to have a will of its own.
51A prized object turns out to be highly dangerous to its owner.
52The heroes will find they've bitten off more than they can chew, and are hard-pressed just to survive.
53The heroes are working to clear someone falsely accused.
54The heroes are wrongly suspected of having committed a crime.
55The heroes must protect someone, without them knowing it.
56The heroes are placed in charge of a large operation, but only because it's headed for disaster.
61The heroes are targeted by villains, and must find out why.
62The heroes have been chosen for their quest precisely because they aren't prepared for it.
63The heroes and villains alike are manipulated by a third force.
64The mission will contain many elements of (roll again: 1-2 science fiction 3-4 horror 5 gameshows 6 'reality' TV).
65The adventure is governed by formal rules or rituals.
66The heroes' memories have been tampered with, and fixing this is a major part of the adventure.
 
 
Wilderness Locations
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
The GM should roll on this table more frequently for more fertile areas: for example once for every 5 mile/8km square area in forest or fertile plains, up to every 50 mile/80km square area in desert.

For a result of 'Settlement', the tables in the 'Cities and Towns' section might be helpful.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2Settlement.
1-23-4Roll on the 'Single Buildings in Wilderness' table below.
1-25-6Roll on the 'Castles and Towers' table below.
3-41-2Roll on the 'Wilderness Temples' table below.
3-43-4Ruin. Roll again for what it was before it fell into run: 1-2 settlement 3-4 single building 5-6 castle or tower. Roll on the appropriate table below for more detail. The ruin has a higher chance of being occupied than the surrounding land (usually by animals or monsters, but possibly by bandits, refugees etc).
3-45-6Underground Complex.
5-61-2Roll on the 'Special Locations' table below.
5-63-4Nothing.
5-65-6Nothing.
 
 
Special Locations
source or inspiration: Michael Curtis and Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Bridge - roll on the 'Bridges' table below.
13-4Bridge as above.
15-6Burrow of giant animals.
21-2Campsite.
23-4Hollow Tree - roll on the 'Hollow Trees' table below.
25-6Oracle - roll on the Oracles table below.
31-2A vein of ore, or precious stones, in an exposed rock face. Roll again for what: 1 tin 2 copper 3-5 iron 6 roll on the 'Precious and Semi-Precious Stones' table in the 'Treasure' section.
33-4A lightning-stuck tree. The blackened and splintered wood of the tree might be useful for making a magic wand, particularly one related to lightning.
35-6A stream or pond teeming with fish. However, there is a 1 in 3 chance that it will have some kind of magical guardian: if so, roll on the 'No Fishing' table above..
41-2A stream or pond with a moderate number of fish. There is a 1 in 6 chance that it will have some kind of magical guardian.
43-4A rocky promontory, tall tree, or other height that provides an excellent view into neighbouring regions, with the obvious exceptions of hills, mountains and forests. If there is a special location, lair, or other unique feature noticeable from afar, it is likely to be visible from this point.
45-6A narrow gorge. If there is a river or stream, the water flows through the gorge in a series of whitewater rapids. This makes water travel faster but more dangerous.
51-2A rock face or boulder that looks like the face of a humanoid creature. Roll again: 1-3 a natural oddity 4 the work of an intelligent artisan 5 a sleeping creature, a stone giant or similar creature 6 a dead creature, for example a troll that has been turned to stone by the sun.
53-4An abandoned (roll again: 1-3 mine 4-6 quarry). It has a higher chance of being occupied than the surrounding land (usually by animals or monsters, but possibly by bandits, refugees etc). Old quarries, in areas with sufficient rainfall, will have filled with rainwater, creating deep artificial lakes.
55-6A concentration of natural mystic power. There are more likely to be magical creatures here than the surrounding land. Animal-like creatures will avoid the area, but if there are any humans or other intelligent creatures in the area at least some will be likely to use it as a place of worship. There is a 50% chance that the location is protected by a magical guardian.
61-2A recent fire or similar disaster has rendered this land a waste. There will be no animals or creatures here (but no possibility of hunting or gathering food).
63-4An area of exposed rock containing numerous fossils. These relics may be that of prehistoric creatures or more mystical beasts depending on the campaign world. There is a 50% chance these fossils are worth a small amount of money to alchemists, wizards, some merchants etc.
65-6An ancient burial ground. Optionally roll again: 1 individual graves, 3 a single mass grave 5 barrows (raised artificial hills over graves) 6 raised platforms 7 roll on the 'Wilderness Temples' table below. Optionally roll 2 dice: on a total of exactly 4 or 5 the burial ground is haunted. Optionally roll 2 dice (unrelated to the first roll): on a total of exactly 3, 4 or 5 the burial ground has some treasure.
 
 
Wilderness Temples
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
This table is designed for temples in wilderness areas. Cities will be likely to have many temples dedicated to competing gods, and each of them will be likely to be smaller (though not necessarily to have less worshippers).
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Monastery or Nunnery - A central garden surrounded by living and worship areas, together with large meeting halls, workshops and so on.
2Pyramid: roll again - 1-2 smooth (Egyptian style), 3-4 stepped (South American style), 5-6 as 3-4, with a sacrificial altar at the top.
3Circle of stones.
4A single, rectangular building.
5A single, domed building.
6Several buildings clustered around a central temple. Roll again for the type of temple, ignoring this result..
 
 
Temples: What God or Goddess?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Most gods and goddesses will also have minor roles associated with their major one. For example, a god of the sea is likely to also be god of fishing, boats etc. In a society where people only pursued crafts if they were unable to hunt, a god of blacksmiths might also be the god of old age, or of deformity.

Some results are marked with a (+). If you get one of these results, and if the temple is in area where more than one intelligent species lives and intermingles, roll again. On a 1 or 2, the god or goddess used to be whatever the result was, but is now thought of by people in the area as simply a god or goddess of their species. For example: the GM decides to create a temple in a town inhabited by both dwarves and hobbits, for a dwarf god. The GM rolls 6 then 1, getting 'thunder'. They then roll a 1. This means that the god was originally the dwarves' god of thunder, but is now considered (at least in this town) to be simply a god of dwarves.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11roll again: 1-3 king/queen of the gods (+), 4-6 father/mother of the gods (+).
12women.
13men.
14marriage.
15love and beauty.
16marriage, love and beauty.
21fertility and agriculture (+).
22fertility, agriculture, love and sex (+).
23the seas.
24seas and rivers.
25a particular river (roll again if the temple isn't near a major river).
26a particular sea (roll again if the temple isn't near a sea).
31a good god/dess of wealth and prosperity (+).
32a fickle god/dess of wealth and poverty.
33death.
34fire (roll again: In very cold climates 1-3 god/dess of blacksmiths, 4-6 god/dess of the home. In very warm climates 1-3 god/dess of blacksmiths, 4-6 god/dess of disasters In other climates - 1 god/dess of blacksmiths 2-3 god/dess of disasters 4-5 god/dess of the home 6 has a dual nature as both a good and evil god/dess.).
35roll again: 1-2 blacksmiths and magic (+) 3-6 blacksmiths.
36the sun (or one of the suns, if your game world has more than one)(+).
41roll again: 1-2 hunting 3-4 war 5 war and hunting 6 hunting and the wilderness.
42thieves.
43the moon (or one of the moons, if your game world has more than one). If the cycle of the moon in your game world is roughly a month, as it is in the real world, make another roll. On a 1-3 this deity is a goddess, and is also associated with menstruation, and hence fertility..
44roll again: 1-2 art 3-4 music 5-6 art and music.
45wine and/or beer. roll again: 1-2 also food, 3-4 also sex, 5 also music, other than sacred music 6 only wine and/or beer.
46the creator or creators of the universe (+).
51wisdom (+).
52embalming and tombs.
53judgement.
54roll again: 1-4 evil 5-6 magic and evil.
55roll again: 1-3 healing (+) 4-6 healing and magic (+).
56winter.
61thunder (+).
62trickster.
63god/dess of the area that the temple is in.
64floods (may be a good god/dess in areas like ancient Egypt which rely on flooding for agriculture - in this case only, treat as (+)).
65dancing and athletics.
66roll again: 1-2 magic 3-4 magic and healing (+) 5-6 magic and evil.
 
 
Bridges
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
The GM may make another roll to see if the bridge has a troll or similar creature living under it (1-5 no 6 yes)
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Brick.
2Natural (eg stepping stones over a river).
3Rope.
4Stone.
5Wood.
6An unusual material: roll on the 'Dungeon Doors' table in the 'Dungeons and Combat' section.
 
 
Hollow Trees
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Nothing lives in it.
2Nothing lives in it.
3Pixies or similar creatures live in it.
4Stairs inside the tree lead down to the home of a magician.
5Stairs inside the tree lead down to the home of a family of underground creatures.
6Stairs inside the tree lead down to an underground complex (optionally roll again: 1-3 A benign underground city. The tables in the 'Towns and Cities' section might be useful 4-6 a hostile dungeon. The tables in the 'Dungeons' section may be useful).
 
 
Oracles
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1In a temple.
2In a ruined temple.
3In a forest glade.
4At the centre of a labyrinth.
5In an otherwise abandoned city.
6In a hut or cottage.
 
 
Single Buildings in Wilderness
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Cottage.
2Farmhouse - likely to be surrounded by worked fields, and to have associated buildings such as animal sheds and mills.
3Hall - this could belong to a local noble, or to a guild - especially one which requires an isolated location.
4Hut.
5Inn - likely to be near a reasonably well-travelled road.
6Manor House - Likely to belong to a local noble, and apart from the noble family will also have servants, guards etc.
 
 
Castles and Towers
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Optionally, roll again - on a 6 the castle or tower is deserted.

Other than those that are deserted, the larger a castle the more troops it will have. All castles and towers which aren't deserted will rely on surrounding settlements to provide food, irregular labour and so on.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Single tower - roll again: 1-2 A self-contained tower. 3-4 The last remaining part of an otherwise ruined fortification. 5-6 A beacon - this may have fewer guards than the other two options.
2Single tower as above.
3Small castle or fort. Roll again: 1-3 A self-contained tower with a surrounding wall. 4-6 A manor house surrounded by a moat.
4Medium castle. A central tower (keep), and a surrounding set of walls with smaller towers, probably with one gate.
5Large castle. A central tower (keep), outbuildings, and a series of surrounding walls, probably with more than one gate.
6Fortress. Several keeps and towers of different sizes, outbuildings, and a series of surrounding walls, probably with more than one gate.
 
 
Backgrounds
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
If you want more detail, you may roll on the relevant Profession table.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Barbarian.
2Barbarian.
3Barbarian.
4Peasant.
5Peasant.
6roll again - 1-2 peasant, 3-5 townsfolk, 6 nobility.
 
 
Profession: Barbarians and Peasants
source or inspiration: RuneQuest
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Bard.
13-4Blacksmith.
15-6Craftsman/woman (optionally, roll on the 'Crafts or Trades' table below).
21-2Explorer (reroll both dice for peasants).
23-4Farmer.
25-6Fisherman/woman.
31-2Animal Herder or Handler. Optionally roll again 1 goatherd 2 llama handler 3 mahout (elephant handler) 4 shepherd 5 mule handler 6 swineherd.
33-4Hunter.
35-6Mercenary.
41-2Shaman if a barbarian, Priest if a peasant.
43-4Miner (reroll both dice for barbarians).
45-6Sailor.
51-2Soldier (reroll both dice for barbarians).
53-4Thief.
55-6Witch.
6roll again
 
 
Profession: Townsfolk
source or inspiration: RuneQuest
 
Each result on this table is marked either (N) or (P). This is for if you use the 'Motivations' table below.
Professions marked (N) use 'Motivations: Nobles', while Professions marked (P) use 'Motivations: Peasants'.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2roll again: 1-3 Alchemist (N) 4-6 Wizard (N).
13-4Bard (P).
15-6Blacksmith (P).
21-2Courtier (N).
23-4Craftsman/woman (P) (optionally, roll on the 'Crafts or Trades' table below).
25-6Diplomat (N).
31-2Mercenary (P).
33-4Merchant (N).
35-6Militiaman/woman (P).
41-2Soldier (P).
43-4Physician (N).
45-6Priest (N).
51-2Sailor (P).
53-4Scholar (N).
55-6Soldier (P).
61-2Spy (N).
63-4Thief (P).
65-6Town Guard (P).
 
 
Profession: Nobility
source or inspiration: RuneQuest
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Courtier.
2Diplomat.
3Lord.
4Soldier.
5roll again: 1-3 Explorer, 4-6 Spy.
6roll again: 1-3 Scholar, 4-6 Wizard.
 
 
Profession: Unrealistic (A)
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This is designed to be used with the table below. Roll once on each table, and combine.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Beard.
13-4Bed.
15-6Bread.
21-2Crone.
23-4Door.
25-6Dung.
31-2Ear.
33-4Foot.
35-6Hat.
41-2Hole.
43-4Nose.
45-6Pet.
51-2Sock.
53-4String.
55-6Tree.
61-2Vest.
63-4Wig.
65-6Roll on 'Creatures 5b: Animals' in the 'Creating Creatures' section. Ignore the 'A' or 'An' at the start.
 
 
Profession: Unrealistic (B)
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This is designed to be used with the table above. Roll once on each table, and combine.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Criticiser.
13-4Ethicist.
15-6Finder.
21-2Frightener.
23-4Interpreter.
25-6Lender.
31-2Marketer.
33-4Psychiatrist.
35-6Sexer.
41-2Smeller.
43-4Smuggler.
45-6Straightener.
51-2Stylist.
53-4Supervisor.
55-6Taster.
61-2Taunter.
63-4Therapist.
65-6Trainer.
 
 
Motivations: Barbarians
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
These tables generate a reason why the character chose to go adventuring.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2Fascinated with the civilised world.
1-23-4Their tribe has been wiped out (optionally roll again: 1 by another tribe 2 by an evil shaman or wizard 3-4 by 'civilised' folk 5 by internal strife 6 by disease).
1-25-6Fleeing an unwanted arranged marriage.
3-41-2Chosen for human sacrifice.
3-43-4Rejected in love and set out to prove themselves.
3-45-6Rejected in love and set out to get themselves killed.
5-61-2Sentenced to death for a crime (optionally roll again: 1-3 innocent 4 guilty 5 guilty, but had a good reason 6 guilty, but manipulated or tricked into it by another).
5-63-4Exiled for a crime (optionally roll again: 1-3 innocent 4 guilty 5 guilty, but had a good reason 6 guilty, but manipulated or tricked into it by another).
5-65-6Escaping their low status in their tribe.
 
 
Motivations: Peasants
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Too intelligent and inquisitive to be satisfied with the life of a peasant.
14-6Too free-spirited to be satisfied with the life of a peasant.
21-3Escaping an oppressive fuedal lord.
24-6Rejected in love and set out to prove themselves.
31-3Rejected in love and set out to get themselves killed.
34-6Sentenced to death for a crime (optionally roll again: 1-3 innocent 4 guilty 5 guilty, but had a good reason 6 guilty, but manipulated or tricked into it by another).
41-3Escaped convict (optionally roll again: 1-3 innocent 4 guilty 5 guilty, but had a good reason 6 guilty, but manipulated or tricked into it by another).
44-6Family were killed (optionally roll again: 1-2 starvation, 3-4 war, 5-6 disease).
51-3Became a refugee (optionally roll again: 1-2 starvation, 3-4 war, 5-6 disease).
54-6Deserted from the army.
61-3Took part in a failed rebellion.
64-6Escaping debt.
 
 
Motivations: Nobles
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3An older sibling is going to inherit the family wealth.
14-6A more favoured sibling is going to inherit the family wealth.
21-3Their family has lost their wealth, due to the adventurers' actions.
24-6Their family has lost their wealth, due to another family member's actions.
31-3Their family has lost their wealth, due to being on the losing side of a war.
34-6Their family has lost their wealth, due to being on the losing side of a political struggle.
41-3Guilt about the source of the family's wealth (optionally roll again: 1-2 slavery 3 crime 4 war 5 political objection to inequality of wealth 6 religious objection to luxury).
44-6Rejected in love and set out to prove themselves.
51-3Rejected in love and set out to get themselves killed.
54-6Wanted for a crime (optionally roll again: 1-3 innocent 4 guilty 5 guilty, but had a good reason 6 guilty, but manipulated or tricked into it by another).
61-3Committed a crime, and was let off on condition that they go into exile (optionally roll again: 1-3 innocent 4 guilty 5 guilty, but had a good reason 6 guilty, but manipulated or tricked into it by another).
64-6Fleeing an unwanted arranged marriage.
 
 
Motivations for Entering a Dungeon
source or inspiration: Jeff's Gameblog
 
This table can be used for any type of character. For more realistic motivations, see the other 'Motivations' tables in the 'Personalising Characters' section.
Some results have X. In this case, roll again: 1 mother 2 father 3 son 4 daughter 5 spouse 6 unrequited love.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3The character is obsessed with proving the existence of a hollow world, with people living on the inside surface (if the characters are from the hollow world, then the character is obsessed with proving the existence of people on the outside surface).
14-6The character quests to retrieve the bones of their famous adventuring ancestor and re-inter them in the family tomb.
21-3The character has terrible but enticing dreams of sitting on the throne of a vast underworld kingdom.
24-6The character owes a large sum of money to someone so powerful that fleeing isn't an option (roll again: 1-3 a high-ranking criminal 4-6 a powerful government).
31-3The character seeks vengeance against the Troll King.
34-6The character's X is dying from a disease that can only be cured with the waters from a sacred subterranean spring.
41-3The character is haunted by visions of a beautiful woman/handsome man living on an island at the center of a vast underground lake (roll again: 1-3 it's the character's true love 4 it's an incubus/succubus 5 it's a sorcerer/sorceress 6 it's someone who died centuries ago.
44-6The character seeks one segment of a magic item. They must obtain all the parts of the item to save their homeland from its foretold doom.
51-3The character's (roll again: 1-3 evil twin 4 robot double 5 clone 6 homonculus) has fled into the dungeon. One or the other must die before both go mad.
54-6The character's X has been trapped in amber and is on display in the trophy room of an evil wizard who lives in the dungeon.
61-3The character's X is imprisoned (optionally roll again: 1-3 innocent 4 guilty 5 guilty, but had a good reason 6 guilty, but manipulated or tricked into it by another). A corrupt official will release them in exchange for a magic item in the dungeon.
64-6The character is obsessed with an item which relates to their profession: a legendary sword for warriors, a great wizard's spellbook for wizards, a holy relic for priests, and so on.
 
 
Crafts or Trades
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2roll again: 1-3 bowyer (makes bows) 4-6 fletcher (makes arrows).
13-4roll again: 1-3 baker 4-6 butcher.
15-6carpenter (boatbuilder).
21-2carpenter (buildings).
23-4carpenter (furniture).
25-6carpenter (decorative).
31-2cartwright (makes carts).
33-4clockmaker (or sundials, depending on your campaign world).
35-6cobbler (shoemaker).
41-2cook.
43-4cooper (barrel-maker).
45-6house painter.
51-2jeweller.
53-4leather worker.
55-6potter.
61-2stonemason.
63-4tailor.
65-6weaver.
 
 
Market Days
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
The result is the number of market days per week. A result of zero means that there are no regular market days the settlement will be visited by individual merchants at irregular intervals.
Settlements of more than 3000 people are likely to have more than one marketplace (they will certainly have more than one actual market day a week), and may also have specialist permanent markets dealing with specific things.
 
Roll 1 dice.
dice roll
population123456
1-150000001
150-320001112
320-500011122
500-1000112223
1000-2000223334
2000+234567
 
 
Market Stalls
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
The number of stalls at a market will be roughly equal to the population of the settlement, divided by 100, but a minimum of about 10.
 
For each stall, roll 2 dice for a settlement of 500 people or less, or 3 dice for a larger settlement. Use the total in either case.
2Agricultural produce (eg fruit, vegetables, wheat).
3Agricultural produce as above.
4Dairy produce (eg milk, cheese).
5Fish if the settlement is near a large river or the sea, meat otherwise.
6Fish or meat as above.
7Livestock.
8Prepared food and/or drink.
9Prepared food and/or drink.
10Cloth goods.
11Leather goods.
12Metal goods.
13Armour and/or weapons.
14Roll on Businesses Table 1.
15Roll on Businesses Table 1.
16Roll on Businesses Table 2.
17Roll on Businesses Table 3.
18Roll on Businesses Table 4.
 
 
Buildings In Settlements
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
If the result is 'private house', you may roll again until you get a 'Business Table' result, then roll on that to determine the occupant's profession.
A tenement is a multi-storey building divided into a number of dwellings, usually in a poor and over-crowded condition.
 
Roll 2 dice, use the total.
dice roll
Area23456789101112
Settlement of 500 people or lessemptyprivate houseprivate houseprivate houseRoll on Businesses Table 1Roll on Businesses Table 1Roll on Businesses Table 1Roll on Businesses Table 1Roll on Businesses Table 1Roll on Businesses Table 1Roll on Businesses Table 1
Poor District of a Town or Cityemptyprivate houseprivate houseprivate housetenementtenementRoll on Businesses Table 1Roll on Businesses Table 1Roll on Businesses Table 1Roll on Businesses Table 2Roll on Businesses Table 3
Merchant District of a Town or Cityemptyprivate houseprivate housetenementRoll on Businesses Table 1Roll on Businesses Table 1Roll on Businesses Table 2Roll on Businesses Table 2Roll on Businesses Table 3Roll on Businesses Table 3Roll on Businesses Table 4
Wealthy District of a Town or Cityemptyprivate houseprivate houseprivate houseprivate houseRoll on Businesses Table 2Roll on Businesses Table 3Roll on Businesses Table 4Roll on Businesses Table 4Roll on Businesses Table 4Roll on Businesses Table 4
 
 
Businesses In Settlements
source or inspiration: Medieval Demographics Made Easy
 
This chart is an easy, mostly non-random way to determine whether a settlement will have a particular kind of business, or how many it will have.
Find the type of business, and divide the population of the settlement by the number in the '1 in..' column. The result is the number of that kind of business.
For example, in a settlement of 4000 people, you'd expect to find 2 copyists, because 4000 divided by 2000 is 2.
If you want, you can treat fractions as a chance of having the relevant business. For example, for a settlement of 5000 people, the result for 'inns' is 2 and a half. You might decide that if you roll 1-3 there'll be two inns, or if you roll 4-6 there'll be three.
 
Type of Business1 in..
Bakers800
Barbers350
Bathers1900
Beer-Sellers1400
Blacksmiths1500
Bleachers2100
Bookbinders3000
Booksellers6300
Buckle Makers1400
Butchers1200
Carpenters550
Chandlers700
Chicken Butchers1000
Coopers700
Copyists2000
Cutlers2300
Doctorsacademically trained doctors - 1700; doctors in total - 350
Fishmongers1200
Furriers250
Glovemakers2400
Harness-Makers2000
Hatmakers950
Hay Merchants2300
Illuminators3900
Inns2000
Jewelers400
Locksmiths1900
Magic-Shops2800
Maidservants250
Masons500
Mercers700
Old-Clothes400
Painters1500
Pastrycooks500
Plasterers1400
Pursemakers1100
Roofers1800
Ropemakers1900
Rugmakers2000
Saddlers1000
Scabbardmakers850
Sculptors2000
Shoemakers150
Spice Merchants1400
Tailors250
Tanners2000
Taverns/Restaurants400
Watercarriers850
Weavers600
Wine-Sellers900
Woodcarvers2400
Woodsellers2400
 
 
Empty Buildings In Settlements - Secret Uses
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice. If the result is 1-5, the building is genuinally abandoned. On a six, roll on this table:
 
Roll 1 dice.
1By criminals.
2By a secret religious group.
3By travellers or squatters.
4By secret lovers.
5By local children.
6As a place to fight duels.
 
 
Empty Buildings In Settlements - Condition
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
You may also roll 1 dice to see if the building is haunted (1-5 no, 6 yes)
 
Roll 1 dice.
1As sound as if it was lived in (roll again 1-2 including furnishings, 3-4 with mouldering and/or broken furnishings, 5-6 stripped bare of furnishings).
2Some signs of decay, but still sound (roll again 1-3 mouldering and/or broken furnishings, 4-6 stripped bare of furnishings).
3Dangerously decayed: floorboards may give, roof may collapse etc.
4Dangerously decayed as above.
5The building was never completed (roll again. 1-3 treat as dangerously decayed, 4-6 treat as ruins).
6Ruins: burnt out, collapsed in a hurricane, abandoned for centuries or similar.
 
 
Businesses Table 1
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Baker.
12Barn.
13Blacksmith.
14Boat Builder (roll again if not near a lake, sea or large river).
15Brewer.
16Builder.
21Butcher.
22Carpenter.
23Cart Maker.
24Cobbler.
25Cooper (barrel maker).
26Coppersmith, brass or lead worker.
31Farmer - livestock.
32Farmer - grain.
33Farmer - fruit.
34Farmer - general.
35Farmer - general.
36General trader.
41Horse trader.
42Inn.
43Laundry.
44Leather worker.
45Mill (water or wind).
46Potter.
51Roofer or Thatcher.
52Sail maker (roll again if not near a lake, sea or large river).
53Sharpener.
54Shepherd.
55Stable.
56Stonemason.
61Tavern.
62Temple or shrine.
63Tinker.
64Warehouse (roll again for contents).
65Weaver.
66Wheelwright.
 
 
Businesses Table 2
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Animal Trader.
12Animal Trainer.
13Armourer.
14Astrologer or Fortune Teller.
15Baker.
16Baker.
21Barber.
22Blacksmith.
23Boat Builder (roll again if not near a lake, sea or large river).
24Bow maker.
25Brewer.
26Butcher.
31Candle Maker.
32Carpet Maker.
33Cartographer (map maker).
34Clock Maker.
35Coppersmith.
36Dried Meat Seller.
41Engraver.
42Fletcher (arrow maker).
43Flower Seller.
44Food Seller.
45Food Seller.
46Food Seller.
51Fruit Seller.
52Fruit Seller.
53Furniture Maker.
54Furrier.
55General Trader.
56General Trader.
61General Trader.
62General Trader.
63Guild Headquarters.
64Herb Seller.
65Horn Worker.
66Horse Trader.
 
 
Businesses Table 3
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Horse Trainer.
12Inn.
13Jeweller.
14Lead Smith.
15Leather Worker.
16Linen Maker.
21Locksmith and Key Maker.
22Pawnshop.
23Net Maker.
24Outfitter.
25Paper and Ink Seller.
26Moneylender.
31Perfumer.
32Potter.
33Roofer or Thatcher.
34Rope Maker.
35Sail Maker (roll again if not near a lake, sea or large river).
36Silk Trader.
41Soap Maker.
42Tailor.
43Stables.
44Stonemason.
45Sword Smith.
46Spice Trader.
51Tattooist.
52Tavern.
53Taxidermist.
54Temple or Shrine.
55Undertaker.
56Vet.
61Warehouse (roll again for contents).
62Warehouse (roll again for contents).
63Warehouse (roll again for contents).
64Wine Seller.
65Weapon Trainer.
66Weaver.
 
 
Businesses Table 4
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Alchemist.
12Architect.
13Animal Trader.
14Animal Trainer.
15Artist.
16Astrologer.
21Bird Trader.
22Food Seller.
23Courthouse.
24Court Official.
25Clockmaker.
26Flower Seller.
31Furrier.
32Gambling Hall.
33Goldsmith.
34Guild Headquarters.
35Inn.
36Jeweller.
41Lawyer.
42Public Baths.
43Musical Instruments.
44Musician or Entertainer.
45Physician.
46Locksmith and key maker.
51Sea Captain (roll again if not near a lake, sea or large river).
52Silversmith.
53Scholar.
54Soldier.
55Sorcerer.
56Stable.
61Spice Merchant.
62Tavern.
63Temple or Shrine.
64Warehouse (roll again for contents).
65Weapon Shop.
66Wine Seller.
 
 
Quality of a Shop, Inn or Tavern
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
If the establishment has more than one distinct product, you might want to roll separately for each one (for example, you might roll separately for an inn's food, alcohol and rooms).
 
Roll 1 dice. In a wealthy area, add 1. In a poor area, subtract 1.
roll, modified if appropriate
0 or 1Awful
2Poor
3Average
4Fair
5Good
6 or 7Great
 
 
Number of Customers in an Inn or Tavern
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
The difference between an inn and a tavern is that an inn rents rooms to travellers, and so will have bedrooms, stables etc. Both inns and taverns sell alcohol, and may also sell food.
Cross-reference the time of day with the area. The result is the number of dice that must be rolled and totalled, not the number of customers.
There will also be 1-3 people working in the place.
Note that this table is intended for inns and taverns in settlements of any size - smaller settlements will have less people, but also less places to go.
On the road, travellers will only find inns. Modify the result depending on how busy the road is.
 
Time of day
AreaMorningAfternoonEveningNight
Poor District, or on the road4465
Merchant District4562
Wealthy District2461
 
 
Inn or Tavern Names 1: Basic Structure
source or inspiration: Abulafia, under the terms of their Creative Commons license.
 
Replace '(noun)' with a roll on Inn or Tavern Names 2: Nouns,
and '(adjective)' with a roll on Inn or Tavern Names 3: Adjectives.
If you get '(number)', roll a dice for the number, but count a 1 or a 6 as 3.
Obviously you should substitute any animals etc that don't exist in your game world.
Note also that only taverns and inns in cities or large towns need to have names.
Inns in small villages might be known simply as 'the inn', or 'Mrs Smith's inn' if there's a need to distinguish one from another.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1The (noun).
2The (number)(noun)s.
3The (noun) and (noun) [note: If you get the same noun twice, re-roll the second one].
4Roll again: 1-3 The (noun)'s Arms 4-6 The (noun)'s Head [Note: if the (noun) wouldn't have a head, eg 'wheatsheaf', use 'The (noun)'s Arms'. 'Arms' usually refers to a coat of arms rather than to limbs, so 'The Bull's Arms' for example makes sense].
5The (adjective)(noun) [Note: re-roll the adjective if it only applies to living things and the noun isn't living].
6The (number)(adjective)(noun)s [see note above].
 
 
Inn or Tavern Names 2: Nouns
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Crown.
12Lion.
13Oak.
14Swan.
15Hart.
16Plough.
21Horse.
22Bell.
23Ship.
24Rose.
25Wheatsheaf.
26Queen.
31Prince.
32Hound.
33Keys.
34Star.
35Castle.
36Sun.
41Anchor.
42Bull.
43Coach.
44Hare.
45Horseshoe.
46Dragon.
51Nag.
52Fox.
53Lamb.
54Mason.
55Beehive.
56Man.
61Traveller.
62Forester.
63Wagon.
64Mermaid.
65Hobbit.
66Witch.
 
 
Inn or Tavern Names 3: Adjectives
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Red.
14-6Royal.
21-3White.
24-6New.
31-3Black.
34-6Golden.
41-3Old.
44-6Green.
51-3Ancient.
54-6Dancing.
61-3Mournful.
64-6Merry.
 
 
Sacred Objects 1: What Is It?
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Ancient writing or pictures.
2A holy spring (this result may not make sense in a large town or city re-roll if so).
3A holy statue.
4A sacred relic (ie a body part).
5The entire spot is sacred.
6Sacred stone.
 
 
Sacred Objects 2: What Does It Do?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1The object has healing powers.
2The object has other powers: roll on the 'Blessings' table below.
3The object is of historical significance.
4as above.
5The object is of symbolic significance only (for example, for a spring, the religion may involve a rite which uses fresh water).
6as above.
 
 
Sacred Relics
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11skull.
12skull, covered in gold.
13skull, covered in silver.
14skull, covered in precious stones (optionally, the GM may roll on the 'Precious and Semi-Precious Stones' table in the 'Treasure' section to see which stones).
15skull, with its eyes magically or miraculously preserved.
16jawbone.
21mummified head.
22single tooth.
23teeth.
24heart, with sacred writing on it which keeps it whole.
25heart, unusually large, preserved in liquid.
26heart - preserved in liquid.
31heart - magically or miraculously preserved.
32sexual organs - preserved in liquid.
33sexual organs - magically or miraculously preserved.
34sexual organs - now black and shrivelled, but still obviously of prodigious size.
35whole hand - preserved in liquid.
36whole hand - miraculously or magically preserved.
41finger-bones from both hands.
42finger-bones from one hand.
43single finger-bone.
44single finger-bone.
45skeleton.
46skeleton - clothed.
51skeleton - clothed, and turned into a puppet which priests operate on sacred occasions.
52tanned and cured skin - face only.
53tanned and cured skin - hands.
54tanned and cured skin - entire body.
55mummified body - naked.
56mummified body - clothed.
61entire body - miraculously or magically preserved - naked.
62entire body, miraculously or magically preserved - dressed in humble clothes.
63entire body, magically or miraculously preserved - dressed in fine clothes.
64entire body, magically or miraculously preserved - dressed as a priest.
65Roll again but the object is of an animal.
66Roll again but the object is of an animal.
 
 
Settlements: Special Features
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 3 times for large cities, twice for medium cities, or once for small cities.
Large towns have a 4 in 6 chance of 1 special feature, Small towns 2 in 6, and villages 1 in 6.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2A well-known sacred site or temple.
13-4An oracle.
15-6A renowned artisan.
21-2A wise philosopher.
23-4A great work of art.
25-6The site of a famous battle.
31-2Regular athletic games.
33-4A curse.
35-6A divine blessing.
41-2A prophecy of doom.
43-4A prophecy of greatness.
45-6A haunted place.
51-2An unliving guardian.
53-4Plagued by bandits.
55-6Plagued by monsters.
61-2Plagued by the flaws of its own inhabitants.
63-4A widely-loved local dish.
65-6Long-past, and possibly legendary days of glory.
 
 
Settlements or Countries: Peace
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Very peaceful: there has been no war in living memory.
2Peaceful: there has been no war in the last generation.
3Average: not currently at war, but there has been one in this generation.
4Average as above.
5Warlike: at war with a neighbouring group.
6Very warlike: at war with all their neighbours.
 
 
Settlements or Countries: Prosperity
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 2 dice, and take the total.
Add 2 if very peaceful, or 1 if peaceful (results over 12 count as 12)
Subtract 2 if very warlike, or 1 if warlike (results less than 2 count as 2)
 
2Very Poor: roll twice on the Economic Misfortune table.
3Poor: roll once on the Economic Misfortune table.
4Poor as above.
5Poor as above.
6Average: Roll once on the Economic Misfortune table, and once on the Economic Fortune table. Contradictory results cancel each other out.
7Average as above.
8Average as above.
9Prosperous: Roll once on the Economic Fortune table.
10Prosperous as above.
11Prosperous as above.
12Very Prosperous: Roll twice on the Economic Fortune table.
 
 
Economic Misfortune
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Bad Communications: all goods cost 10% extra.
2No Mines: all goods of stone or metal cost 20% extra.
3Shortage of Artisans: all goods of a particular type cost twice as much (roll again: 1 weapons, 2 armour and shields, 3 wheeled transport, 4 ships, 5 horses, 6 all non-weapon metal goods).
4Low Population: no mercenaries or servants may be hired.
5Meagre Vineyards: Wine costs three times as much.
6Barren Fields: Food costs twice as much.
 
 
Economic Fortune
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Good Communications: all goods cost 5% less.
2Rich Mines: all goods of stone or metal cost 10% less.
3Master Artisans: all goods of a particular type cost 20% less (roll again: 1 weapons, 2 armour and shields, 3 wheeled transport, 4 ships, 5 horses, 6 all non-weapon metal goods).
4High Population: mercenaries may be hired for 10% less.
5Lush Vineyards: Wine is half price.
6Bountiful Fields: Food is half price.
 
 
Settlements or Countries: Happiness
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 2 dice, and take the total. Apply the following modifiers (results less than 2 count as 2, and over 12 count as 12):
Very Peaceful +2
Peaceful +1
Warlike -1
Very Warlike -2
Very Prosperous +2
Prosperous +1
Poor -1
Very Poor -2
 
2Very Unhappy: The area is frequently at war with itself..
3Very Unhappy as above.
4Very Unhappy as above.
5Unhappy: there is unrest and conflict.
6Unhappy as above.
7Indifferent: there is conflict and intrigue among the rulers, but the general population is rather content.
8Indifferent as above.
9Happy.
10Happy.
11Very Happy.
12Very Happy.
 
 
Settlements or Countries: Justice
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 2 dice, and take the total. Apply the following modifiers (results less than 2 count as 2, and over 12 count as 12):
Very Unhappy -2
Unhappy -1
Happy +1
Very Happy +2
 
2No Justice: Courts and officials will always accept a sufficiently large bribe.
3Weak Justice: Courts and officials are easily bribed.
4Weak Justice as above.
5Indifferent Justice: Some judges and officials are corrupt, but most are honest.
6Indifferent Justice as above.
7Indifferent Justice as above.
8Indifferent Justice as above.
9Indifferent Justice as above.
10Strong Justice: It is very hard to bribe, sway or threaten any court or official.
11Strong Justice as above.
12Adamant Justice: It is absolutely impossible to bribe, sway or threaten any court or official.
 
 
Islands: Coast
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Ringed by reefs.
2Ringed by reefs.
3Ringed by smooth, sandy beaches.
4Ringed by high cliffs.
5A variety of coastline exists.
6A variety of coastline exists.
 
 
Islands: Inhabited?
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 1 dice.
1No inhabitants.
2No settlements, but sometimes visitors from other islands.
3Was once inhabited, but now deserted.
4Small villages.
5A single large town, and surrounding villages.
6A powerful city, many large towns as well as villages.
 
 
Islands: Mysterious Events
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 2 dice, use the total.
2At war with a nearby island.
3A sage or magician is protected by the islanders.
4The 'island' is actually the back of a huge living creature.
5The inhabitants live in harmony.
6The islanders are regularly attacked by (roll again: 1-3 pirates 4-6 a cruel monster).
7The island has a gruesome secret. Is a god involved?
8Strange population - for example no children, no adults, no men, no women - and no one will say why.
9Under the sway of an evil god, goddess, witch, warlock etc.
10They've never seen outsiders.
11The island is the property of a god.
12There are athletic games underway.
 
 
Islands: Special Features
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 3 dice, use the total.
3Natural fountain.
4Waterfalls.
5Statues.
6Forests full of nymphs.
7Large caves.
8Ancient mines.
9Ancient road.
10Ruined fortress.
11Secret tower.
12Remote temple.
13Territorial markers - eg skulls.
14Chasm and rope bridge.
15A smaller island just off the coast.
16Carved mountain.
17Witches cave or glen.
18Roll twice more, ignoring this result.
 
 
Names: Ancient Egyptian, Female
source or inspiration: Zenobia
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Ashayt.
12Beketmut.
13Beketmut.
14Bentanta.
15Esenofre.
16Hetepheres.
21Iset.
22Isisnofret.
23Isisnofret.
24Kiya.
25Maatkare.
26Meresankh.
31Merytamun.
32Meryset.
33Nebettawy.
34Neith.
35Neferu.
36Nefretari.
41Nefretari.
42Nofret.
43Rai.
44Sadeh.
45Sankhkare.
46Sitkamose.
51Sitre.
52Sobekkare.
53Sobeknefru.
54Takhat.
55Tausret.
56Tawaret.
61Tia.
62Tia.
63Tuya.
64Tuya.
65Tiy.
66Tiy.
 
 
Names: Ancient Egyptian, Male
source or inspiration: Zenobia
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
11-21-2Ahmeni.
11-23-4Ahmose.
11-25-6Akhenre.
13-41-2Akhtoy.
13-43-4Ankhpsamtek.
13-45-6Amenemhat.
15-61-2Amenophis.
15-63-4Ay.
15-65-6Ay.
21-21-2Bakenkhnons.
21-23-4Dagi.
21-25-6Djedi.
23-41-2Em.
23-43-4Haremsaf.
23-45-6Henenu.
25-61-2Henenu.
25-63-4Horemeb.
25-65-6Imhotep.
31-21-2Ippi.
31-23-4Kay.
31-25-6Khendjer.
33-41-2Khnumibre.
33-43-4Khufu.
33-45-6Merenptah.
35-61-2Merenre.
35-63-4Merhotepre.
35-65-6Mermesha.
41-21-2Neferhotep.
41-23-4Nefermenu.
41-25-6Nefrusobek.
43-41-2Rahotep.
43-43-4Ranofre.
43-45-6Renseneb.
45-61-2Renseneb.
45-63-4Sahure.
45-65-6Sekhemre.
51-21-2Senuseret.
51-23-4Seostris.
51-25-6Setau.
53-41-2Setepenptah.
53-43-4Setepenra.
53-45-6Seti.
55-61-2Si.
55-63-4Si.
55-65-6Siamun.
61-21-2Sihathor.
61-23-4Sinhue.
61-25-6Sobekhotep.
63-41-2Thothmosis.
63-43-4Userkaf.
63-45-6Userkaf.
65-61-2Wenamun.
65-63-4Wennefer.
65-65-6Zanakht.
 
 
Names: Ancient Greek, Female
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
111-2Agape.
113-4Agathangelos.
115-6Agathe.
121-2Aglaia.
123-4Alexandra.
125-6Ambrosia.
131-2Ambrosia.
133-4Appolonia.
135-6Appolonia.
141-2Ariana.
143-4Aristomache.
145-6Artemisia.
151-2Aspasia.
153-4Atalanta.
155-6Athanasia.
161-2Athene.
163-4Briesis.
165-6Charis.
211-2Charis.
213-4Cybela.
215-6Demetria.
221-2Demostrate.
223-4Dionysia.
225-6Dionysia.
231-2Doto.
233-4Eirene.
235-6Elpis.
241-2Epicaste.
243-4Eriboea.
245-6Eudokia.
251-2Eudoxia.
253-4Eumelia.
255-6Eunike.
261-2Euphemia.
263-4Euphemia.
265-6Eurynome.
311-2Euthalia.
313-4Eutropia.
315-6Evadne.
321-2Gaiane.
323-4Galatea.
325-6Hekabe.
331-2Hekabe.
333-4Hypatia.
335-6Hyrmina.
341-2Iaera.
343-4Iomene.
345-6Iphis.
351-2Kallisto.
353-4Kallistrate.
355-6Kallistrate.
361-2Koritto.
363-4Kyra.
365-6Lais.
411-2Laodameia.
413-4Lempetie.
415-6Ligeia.
421-2Lysandra.
423-4Malaga.
425-6Malaga.
431-2Medesicaste.
433-4Melaina.
435-6Mila.
441-2Myrinne.
443-4Mysia.
445-6Nikephoros.
451-2Niobe.
453-4Olympia.
455-6Olympias.
461-2Otonia.
463-4Paeonia.
465-6Panope.
511-2Pelagia.
513-4Pellene.
515-6Phile.
521-2Phoedocia.
523-4Photine.
525-6Ptolemais.
531-2Rebia.
533-4Rhea.
535-6Rhea.
541-2Rhodope.
543-4Scipia.
545-6Scylla.
551-2Selline.
553-4Sophronia.
555-6Sostrate.
561-2Sotera.
563-4Spartanica.
565-6Syntyche.
611-2Telephasse.
613-4Thais.
615-6Themis.
621-2Theodora.
623-4Theodosia.
625-6Theophania.
631-2Theophila.
633-4Thessala.
635-6Thisbe.
641-2Timo.
643-4Tryphosa.
645-6Urania.
651-2Xanthe.
653-4Xanthippe.
655-6Xene.
661-2Zenobia.
663-4Zoe.
665-6Zosime.
 
 
Names: Ancient Greek, Male
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
111-2Agathon.
113-4Aisopos.
115-6Akakios.
121-2Alexandros.
123-4Alexios.
125-6Alkaios.
131-2Ambrosios.
133-4Anakletos.
135-6Anaxagoras.
141-2Anaxagoras.
143-4Andronikos.
145-6Antipater.
151-2Apollinaris.
153-4Apollodoros.
155-6Apollonios.
161-2Archelaos.
163-4Archippos.
165-6Argyros.
211-2Aristarchus.
213-4Aristokles.
215-6Ariston.
221-2Arkadios.
223-4Arsenios.
225-6Artemidoros.
231-2Artemisios.
233-4Artemisios.
235-6Athanasios.
241-2Bion.
243-4Chariton.
245-6Chariton.
251-2Chrysanthos.
253-4Demosthenes.
255-6Diodotos.
261-2Dodekatheon.
263-4Dodekatheon.
265-6Eirenaios.
311-2Eleutherios.
313-4Epaphroditos.
315-6Epaphroditos.
321-2Epiktetos.
323-4Epiros.
325-6Euaristos.
331-2Euphranor.
333-4Eusathios.
335-6Eusebios.
341-2Eutropios.
343-4Eutychios.
345-6Gennadios.
351-2Helladios.
353-4Herakleides.
355-6Herakleitos.
361-2Hermogenes.
363-4Hermokrates.
365-6Hermolaos.
411-2Heron.
413-4Hippolytos.
415-6Kallias.
421-2Karpos.
423-4Kyriakos.
425-6Kyros.
431-2Lykourgos.
433-4Lysimachos.
435-6Methodios.
441-2Metrophanes.
443-4Miltiades.
445-6Mnason.
451-2Nikandros.
453-4Nikephoros.
455-6Nikias.
461-2Nikodemos.
463-4Olympiodoros.
465-6Olympos.
511-2Onesimos.
513-4Pamphilos.
515-6Pankratios.
521-2Pantaleon.
523-4Panther.
525-6Pantheras.
531-2Paramonos.
533-4Pelagios.
535-6Phaidros.
541-2Philon.
543-4Philotheos.
545-6Phokas.
551-2Polycarpos.
553-4Praxiteles.
555-6Prochoros.
561-2Ptolemaios.
563-4Pyros.
565-6Seleukos.
611-2Simonides.
613-4Sophronios.
615-6Sosigenes.
621-2Straton.
623-4Themistokles.
625-6Theodoros.
631-2Theodotos.
633-4Theophylaktos.
635-6Theophylaktos.
641-2Therapon.
643-4Theron.
645-6Thoukydides.
651-2Tryphon.
653-4Xenokrates.
655-6Xenokrates.
661-2Zopyros.
663-4Zosimos.
665-6Zotikos.
 
 
Names: Ancient Middle-East, Female
source or inspiration: Zenobia
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
111-3Abi-simti.
114-6Ahassunu.
121-3Ahatiwaqrat.
124-6Ahunatum.
131-3Alittum.
134-6Ammat-Baal.
141-3Amurritum.
144-6Arah-Sammat.
151-3Arinna.
154-6Arwi-a.
161-3Assur-sharrat.
164-6Athaliah.
211-3Baranamtara.
214-6Belessunu.
221-3Bikku-lum.
224-6Bittatum.
231-3Daqqartum.
234-6Dunnasha.
241-3Elamassi.
244-6Enanedu.
251-3Enannatum.
254-6Eshargamelat.
261-3Habadjilat.
264-6Habannatum.
311-3Humusi.
314-6Hunabatum.
321-3Iltani.
324-6Ilusha-hegal.
331-3Ishtar-belessa.
334-6Ishtar-gamelat.
341-3Ishtar-ibbi.
344-6Ishtar-rabi-at.
351-3Kammani.
354-6Ku-aya.
361-3Liwwiresagil.
364-6Manatum.
411-3Mekubi.
414-6Muallit-sherua.
421-3Munawirtum.
424-6Nakurtum.
431-3Naqia.
434-6Ninab.
441-3Nin-kagina.
444-6Ninduzu.
451-3Nintur.
454-6Nis-Anat.
461-3Nuptaya.
464-6Nuratum.
511-3Rahab.
514-6Sammuramat.
521-3Samhat.
524-6Samshi.
531-3Sarai.
534-6Sapurtum.
541-3Shaddita.
544-6Sharrat-sippar.
551-3Siduri.
554-6Simanat.
561-3Sin-nada.
564-6Summirat-ishtar.
611-3Tabni-ishtar.
614-6Takurtum.
621-3Taram-uram.
624-6Tamar.
631-3Tasmetum-sharrat.
634-6Telpunnaya.
641-3Tisha-Lim.
644-6Tukkin-khatta.
651-3Ummi-waqrat.
654-6Yadidatum.
661-3Wurusemu.
664-6Zakutu.
 
 
Names: Ancient Middle-East, Male
source or inspiration: Zenobia
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
111Abdi-arah.
112Abdu-Heba.
113Abiditan.
114Abi-eshu.
115Abiyamuta.
116Abuwaqar.
121roll again: 1-3 Adda-kalla 4-6 Addi-liblut.
122Agga.
123Aham-nishi.
124Ahatiwaqrat.
125roll again: 1-2 Ahikibani 3-4 Ahiman 5-6 Ahi-shagish.
126Ah-kalla.
131roll again: 1-3 Ahum 4-6 Ahum-waqar.
132roll again: 1-3 Ahuratum 4-6 Ahu-shina.
133Akiya.
134Ali-ellati.
135Allala.
136Ammi-ditana.
141Amnanu.
142roll again: 1-2 Apil-ashnan 3-4 Apil-ilishu 5-6 Apilsha.
143Apiyatum.
144Appanili.
145Arammadara.
146Arnuwanda.
151Ashi-qurud.
152Ashmadu.
153Asharidu.
154Assurna'da.
155roll again: 1-2 Assur-Dan 3-4 Assur-susuli 5-6 Assur-taklaku.
156roll again: 1 Awil-aya 2 Awiliya 3-4 Awil-ninurta 5-6 Awil-shamash.
161Aziru.
162Azi.
163Azuzum.
164Babati.
165Baya.
166Bakshishum.
211Baasha.
212Balak.
213Balaam.
214Balasi.
215Baladan.
216Bar-Gush.
221Baqqanum.
222roll again: 1-2 Belanum 3-4 Belakum 5-6 Bel-Akum.
223Belshimani.
224Beli-Ashared.
225roll again: 1-2 Bel-Ibni 3-4 Bel-Shamin 5-6 Bel-Shazzar.
226Belshunu.
231Ben-Hadad.
232Benteshina.
233Bilalama.
234Burnaburiash.
235roll again: 1-3 Buhazum 4-6 Burrukam.
236roll again: 1-3 Dazuzum 4-6 Duququm.
241Ditanu.
242Durrimush.
243Ea-nasir.
244Ebarti.
245Ekur-zakir.
246roll again: 1-3 El-Ah 4-6 El-Isha.
251Ellu-mushu.
252Eluti.
253Enlilbani.
254roll again: 1-2 Enlil-ennam 3-4 Enlil-kurgalani 5-6 Enlil-zi-shagal.
255Ennam-belum.
256Enentarzi.
261Eshmunazar.
262roll again: 1-3 Etel-pisha 4-6 Etel-pi-sharrim.
263roll again: 1-3 Etirum 4-6 Etum.
264Gazualum.
265Geshur.
266roll again: 1-3 Gimil-lum 4-6 Gimil-ninurta.
311roll again: 1-3 Hadad-Shuma 4-6 Hadad-ezer.
312Hadaya.
313Hallushu.
314Heana.
315Hunhalbida.
316Huttupum.
321roll again: 1-2 Ibbi-adad 3-4 Ibbi-shahan 5-6 Ibi.
322roll again: 1-3 Iblinum 4-6 Ibnatum.
323Ibni-amurru.
324Idrimi.
325roll again: 1-2 Iddin-Enlil 3-4 Iddin-Ilum 5-6 Iddin-Ninshubur.
326Igmilum.
331Ila-kabkabu.
332roll again: 1-3 Ilanum 4-6 Ilialum.
333roll again: 1-3 Ili-idinnam 4-6 Ili-iqisham.
334Illuratum.
335roll again: 1-3 Ilshu-abushu 4-6 Ilshubani.
336Imdiilum.
341Imgua.
342Inim-shara.
343Iphur-kishi.
344Ipqatum.
345roll again: 1-2 Ipqu-adad 3-4 Ipqu-annunitum 5-6 Ipqu-aya.
346Iptiyamuta.
351roll again: 1-3 Irra 4-6 Irrara.
352roll again: 1 Ishme-adad 2-3 Ishme-dagan 4-5 Ishme-Ea 6 Ishme-karab.
353Kadashman.
354Kandalanu.
355Karaindash.
356Kassis.
361Kikuid.
362Kubburum.
363Kudiya.
364roll again: 1-2 Ku-enlila 3-4 Ku-inanna 5-6 Ku-ningal.
365Kurhitti-mushtesher.
366Kurumtum.
411Kuwari.
412Lamusa.
413La'um.
414roll again: 1 Lipit-ea 2-3 Lipit-enlil 4-5 Lipit-ishtar 6 Lipit-tishpak.
415Lubarna.
416roll again: 1-2 Lu-amarsuenaka 3 Lu-bau 4 Lu-dingira 5-6 Lu-enlila.
421roll again: 1-3 Luga 4-6 Lugatum.
422roll again: 1-2 Lugal-azida 3-4 Lugalkam 5-6 Lugal-urudu.
423roll again: 1 Lu-inana 2 Lu-nin-ilduma 3-4 Lu-ninurta 5-6 Lu-shalim.
424Macath.
425Malgum-liblut.
426roll again: 1-2 Marduk-asir 3-4 Marduk-shakin 5-6 Marduk-balassu.
431Mari-ersetim.
432Maru-yatum.
433Mattaki.
434Mazdata.
435Melishipak.
436Merodach-baladan.
441Mezizi.
442Minninum.
443Mukannishum.
444Munawirtum.
445Muurgallu.
446Mut-kabid.
451Mutu-bisir.
452Nabopalassar.
453roll again: 1-3 Nabu-Nasir 4-6 Nabu-bani.
454Namhu.
455Nammahani.
456Namzu.
461Narubtum.
462Nasha.
463roll again: 1-3 Nergal-etir 4-6 Nergal-erish.
464Nidnatum.
465Nin-unumun-ki-ag.
466Ninurta-ra'im-zerim.
511roll again: 1-2 Nur-ishtar 3-4 Nur-kubi 5-6 Nur-shamash.
512Pirhum.
513Pushuken.
514Puzu.
515roll again: 1-2 Puzur-assur 3-4 Puzur-erra 5-6 Puzur-ishtar.
516Qisht-ea.
521Rabi-sillashu.
522Rakhianu.
523Rashil.
524Rimush.
525Sagil-zimu.
526Salu.
531Sangara.
532Sargon.
533Seskalla.
534Shalanum.
535Shalim-tehhushu.
536Shalmaneser.
541Shallurum.
542roll again: 1 Shamash-andulli 2 Shamash-gamil 3-4 Shamash-hazir 5-6 Shamash-nasir.
543Shatamurrim.
544Sharkali-Shari.
545Sherumili.
546Shesh-kalla.
551Shesai.
552Shubnalu.
553Shummanla-shamash.
554Shulgi.
555Shuppilu-Liumesh.
556Shuqallilum.
561Sidu.
562Sig-ersetim.
563roll again: 1-3 Sinnashi 4-6 Sinnasir.
564Sumalika.
565roll again: 1-3 Sumuil 4-6 Sumu-la-el.
566roll again: 1-3 Talmai 4-6 Talmi-Teshub.
611Taribatum.
612Tarkhulara.
613Tirigan.
614Tubityamuta.
615roll again: 1-3 Turam 4-6 Turam-dagan.
616Tuttar-shar.
621Ubarum.
622Udama.
623Udish.
624Ugazum.
625roll again: 1 Ur-dumizida 2 Ur-gula 3 Ur-lama 4 Urshubula 5 Ur-shulpae 6 Ur-Zaba.
626Uselli.
631Uta-misharam.
632roll again: 1 Warad-enlil 2 Warad-iliya 3-4 Warad-ishtar 4 Warad-kubi 5 Warad-murrim.
633Warassuni.
634roll again: 1-3 Wardum 4-6 Watrum.
635Wusum-beli.
636Yahurum.
641Yamquzzuhalamma.
642Yashub-yahad.
643Yayatum.
644Zamaranum.
645Zaninum.
646roll again: 1-3 Eth-Baal 4-6 Zeru-Baal.
651Ziyatum.
652Zummabu.
653roll again: 1 Yasmah-addu 2 Askur-addu 3 Ishhi-addu 4 Samsi-addu 5 Shamshi-addu 6 Yassur-addu.
654roll again: 1-2 Kudur-Enlil 3-4 Nabi-Enlil 5-6 Shubat-Enlil.
655roll again: 1-2 Hanun-dagan 3-4 Puzrish-dagan 5 Sillush-dagan 6 Zimri-dagan.
656roll again: 1-2 Rish-shamash 3-4 Shummanla-shamash 5-6 Warad-shamash.
661roll again: 1-2 Awil-ishtar 3-4 Bunu-ishtar 5-6 Utul-ishtar.
662roll again: 1-2 Ibal-pi-el 3-4 Milki-la-el 5 Samu-El 6 Werket-El.
663roll again: 1-2 Ad-mat-ili 3-4 Nawirum-ili 5-6 Ayar-ilum.
664roll again: 1 Damqi-ilishu 2 Mannumki-iliya 3 Mar-iltum 4-5 Zababa-il 6 Qishti-ilabrat.
665roll again: 1-2 Yaggit-lim 3-4 Yahdun-lim 5-6 Yarim-lim.
666roll again: 1-3 Ikuppi-adad 4-6 Remanni-Adad.
 
 
Names: Barbarians, Female
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table and the one below have a mixture of British, Irish, German and Scandinavian names.
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
111-2Adalbjorg.
113-4Aeronwen.
115-6Alfsigr.
121-2Anu.
123-4Anya.
125-6Arnthrud.
131-2Arnthrud.
133-4Asdis.
135-6Astridr.
141-2Berach.
143-4Bergthora.
145-6Betrys.
151-2Brona.
153-4Brynhildr.
155-6Canice.
161-2Caron.
163-4Carra.
165-6Ceridwen.
211-2Cyneburga.
213-4Deedra.
215-6Delyth.
221-2Dorind.
223-4Drifa.
225-6Dunla.
231-2Eadburga.
233-4Echna.
235-6Eira.
241-2Enat.
243-4Enat.
245-6Eoforhild.
251-2Evgren.
253-4Eydis.
255-6Fenit.
261-2Fidelma.
263-4Fionnait.
265-6Flann.
311-2Freygerd.
313-4Freygerd.
315-6Frideswide.
321-2Grania.
323-4Grian.
325-6Grimhildr.
331-2Grimhildr.
333-4Gudlaug.
335-6Gudrid.
341-2Gwenfrewi.
343-4Gwladus.
345-6Gwyneira.
351-2Helga.
353-4Helga.
355-6Hjordis.
361-2Ingegard.
363-4Jorunn.
365-6Kadlin.
411-2Keeva.
413-4Liffey.
415-6Lowri.
421-2Luitgard.
423-4Maeve.
425-6Mairwen.
431-2Marga.
433-4Marged.
435-6Meinwin.
441-2Mererid.
443-4Miren.
445-6Moncha.
451-2Monina.
453-4Morwenna.
455-6Narvla.
461-2Nemon.
463-4Niamh.
465-6Nidbiorg.
511-2Ogn.
513-4Olwen.
515-6Olwen.
521-2Oona.
523-4Orla.
525-6Ragnbjorg.
531-2Ragnfridr.
533-4Rannveig.
535-6Rathnat.
541-2Rhian.
543-4Rosheen.
545-6Scoth.
551-2Serc.
553-4Seren.
555-6Sheedy.
561-2Sigrid.
563-4Sigrid.
565-6Sigrun.
611-2Sigrun.
613-4Sioned.
615-6Sive.
621-2Slaney.
623-4Teafa.
625-6Tegwen.
631-2Thordis.
633-4Thorfridr.
635-6Tonna.
641-2Tressa.
643-4Tuamnait.
645-6Tuathla.
651-2Ulfeid.
653-4Valdis.
655-6Valgerd.
661-2Valgerd.
663-4Vigdis.
665-6Yrsa.
 
 
Names: Barbarians, Male
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
111-2Abban.
113-4Adalbert.
115-6Adalsteinn.
121-2Adelmar.
123-4Aedelbert.
125-6Aedelfrid.
131-2Aedelmaer.
133-4Aedelred.
135-6Aedelstan.
141-2Aelfheah.
143-4Aesc.
145-6Agnar.
151-2Alareiks.
153-4Alrik.
155-6Amalric.
161-2Amalric.
163-4Angus.
165-6Aodh.
211-2Ari.
213-4Berach.
215-6Berrin.
221-2Bothvar.
223-4Bran.
225-6Brand.
231-2Broc.
233-4Brychan.
235-6Cadfan.
241-2Caradog.
243-4Carwyn.
245-6Cormac.
251-2Cynefrid.
253-4Dai.
255-6Diarf.
261-2Diarmaid.
263-4Eadberht.
265-6Eadwig.
311-2Eirikr.
313-4Elgfrothi.
315-6Ethelbert.
321-2Eunan.
323-4Eysteinn.
325-6Fergal.
331-2Finn.
333-4Folkmar.
335-6Geirmund.
341-2Geirmund.
343-4Gethin.
345-6Goronwy.
351-2Gruffydd.
353-4Gruffydd.
355-6Gwynfor.
361-2Hakan.
363-4Hallbjorn.
365-6Halli.
411-2Heddwyn.
413-4Hengis.
415-6Hereward.
421-2Herleif.
423-4Hludwig.
425-6Horsa.
431-2Hrafn.
433-4Hrothgar.
435-6Hrothgar.
441-2Idris.
443-4Idwal.
445-6Ingimund.
451-2Ingvarr.
453-4Ingvarr.
455-6Iorath.
461-2Iorwerth.
463-4Jarnskeggi.
465-6Kjallak.
511-2Lassar.
513-4Leiknir.
515-6Leofric.
521-2Leofwine.
523-4Llewellyn.
525-6Mar.
531-2Maredudd.
533-4Maxen.
535-6Merfyn.
541-2Morcant.
543-4Mullen.
545-6Nafni.
551-2Neifion.
553-4Neirin.
555-6Onund.
561-2Raban.
563-4Ragnvald.
565-6Ragnvald.
611-2Ronan.
613-4Shay.
615-6Skallagrim.
621-2Skallagrim.
623-4Snorri.
625-6Snorri.
631-2Stigandr.
633-4Tancred.
635-6Theodric.
641-2Thidrandi.
643-4Thorbjorn.
645-6Thorir.
651-2Ulf.
653-4Ultan.
655-6Veleif.
661-2Waltheof.
663-4Wine.
665-6Wybert.
 
 
Names: Elves, Female
source or inspiration: James Hutchings, original information from J.R.R. Tolkien.
Thanks to Wikipedia for the lists that these tables are based on.
 
This table and the one below freely mix the two main elven languages in Tolkien's books (Quenya and Sindarin), as well as the various different kinds of names that elves could have (such as seperate names given by their mother and father)
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
1-21-21-2Amarie.
1-21-23-4Anaire.
1-21-25-6Aredhel (means 'Noble elf').
1-23-41-2Earwen (means 'Sea-maiden').
1-23-43-4Eldalote (means 'Elven-flower').
1-23-45-6Enelye.
1-25-61-2Elenwe.
1-25-63-4Faniel.
1-25-65-6Findis.
3-41-21-2Finduilas.
3-41-23-4Finvain.
3-41-25-6Idril (means 'Sparkling brilliance').
3-43-41-2Iminye.
3-43-43-4Indis.
3-43-45-6Irien.
3-45-61-2Irime.
3-45-63-4Itarilde (means 'Sparkling brilliance').
3-45-65-6Lalwen.
5-61-21-2Lalwende.
5-61-23-4Luthien (means either 'Enchantress' or 'Blossom').
5-61-25-6Melian.
5-63-41-2Miriel.
5-63-43-4Mithrellas.
5-63-45-6Nellas.
5-65-61-2Nerdanel.
5-65-63-4Nimrodel.
5-65-65-6Tinuviel (means 'Daughter of the starry twilight', which signifies 'Nightingale').
 
 
Names: Elves, Male
source or inspiration: James Hutchings, original information from J.R.R. Tolkien.
Thanks to Wikipedia for the lists that these tables are based on.
 
Note on the results that call for something to be added at the start or end of the name:
if you get one of these results, ignore and re-roll any others.
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
111-3Aegnor (means 'Fell-fire').
114-6Amdir.
121-3Amras.
124-6Amrod.
131-3Amroth.
134-6Angrod (means 'Iron-noble').
141-3Aranwe.
144-6Aulendur.
151-3Beleg (means 'Might').
154-6Beren.
161-3Caranthir.
164-6Celebrimbor.
211-3Celegorm (means 'Hasty-riser', implying 'quick-tempered').
214-6Cirdan (means 'Ship-maker').
221-3Daeron.
224-6Duilin.
231-3Earendil.
234-6Ecthelion.
241-3Egalmoth.
244-6Egnor.
251-3Elemmakil.
254-6Elladan.
261-3Elrohir.
264-6Elu (means 'Star-man').
311-3Elwe (means 'Star-man').
314-6Enerdhil.
321-3Eol.
324-6Erestor.
331-3Feanor (means 'Spirit of fire').
334-6Felagund (means 'Hewer of caves').
341-3Finarfin.
344-6Fingolfin.
351-3Fingon (means 'Skill-hero').
354-6Finwe (means either 'Hair' or 'Skill').
361-3Finwion.
364-6Galdor.
411-3Gelmir.
414-6Gildor.
421-3Glorfindel (means 'Golden-haired').
424-6Gwindor.
431-3Haldir.
434-6Imin.
441-3Inglor.
444-6Ingwe (means 'First one' or 'Chief').
451-3Lindir.
454-6Mablung (means 'Heavy hand').
461-3Maedhros.
464-6Maeglin (means 'Sharp glance').
511-3Maglor.
514-6Mahtan.
521-3Malgalad.
524-6Olwe.
531-3Orodreth.
534-6Oropher.
541-3Orophin.
544-6Pengolodh.
551-3Rumil.
554-6Saeros.
561-3Salgant.
564-6Singillo.
611-3Thingol (means 'Greycloak').
614-6Thranduil.
621-3Tuor.
624-6Turgon (means 'Valiant lord').
631-3Voronwe (means 'Steadfast one').
634-6Roll again but add 'Curu' to the start of the name. For example 'Daeron' becomes 'Curudaeron'. Means 'Skilled'.
641-3Roll again but add 'Pitya' to the start of the name. Means 'Little'.
644-6Roll again but add 'Mori' to the start of the name. Means 'Dark'.
651-3Roll again but add 'Telun' to the start of the name. Means 'Last' (implying 'youngest descendent of...').
654-6Roll again but add 'Turka' to the start of the name. Means 'Strong-willed'.
661-3Roll again but get rid of the last syllable and replace it with 'rod'. For example 'Gelmir' becomes 'Gelrod'. Means 'Mighty descendent of...'.
664-6Roll again but if the name ends in a consonant, add 'ion' at the end (for example 'Gelmir' becomes 'Gelmirion'). Or if the name ends in a vowel, get rid of that letter and add 'ion' at the end (for example 'Ingwe' becomes 'Ingwion'). Means 'Son of..'.
 
 
Names: Hobbits, Female
source or inspiration: James Hutchings, original information from J.R.R. Tolkien.
Thanks to Wikipedia for the lists that these tables are based on.
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
11-21-2Adaldrida.
11-23-4Adamanta.
11-25-6Amaranth.
13-41-2Angelica.
13-43-4Asphodel.
13-45-6Bell.
15-61-2Belladonna.
15-63-4Berylla.
15-65-6Camellia.
21-21-2Celandine.
21-23-4Chica.
21-25-6Daisy.
23-41-2Diamond.
23-43-4Donnamira.
23-45-6Dora.
25-61-2Eglantine.
25-63-4Elanor.
25-65-6Esmeralda.
31-21-2Estella.
31-23-4Firiel.
31-25-6Gilly.
33-41-2Goldilocks.
33-43-4Hanna.
33-45-6Hilda.
35-61-2Hildigard.
35-63-4Lalia.
35-65-6Laura.
41-21-2Lily.
41-23-4Linda.
41-25-6Lobelia.
43-41-2Malva.
43-43-4Marigold.
43-45-6May.
45-61-2Melilot.
45-63-4Menegilda.
45-65-6Mentha.
51-21-2Mimosa.
51-23-4Mirabella.
51-25-6Myrtle.
53-41-2Pansy.
53-43-4Pearl.
53-45-6Peony.
55-61-2Pervinca.
55-63-4Pimpernel.
55-65-6Poppy.
61-21-2Primrose.
61-23-4Primula.
61-25-6Prisca.
63-41-2Rosa.
63-43-4Rosamunda.
63-45-6Rose.
65-61-2Ruby.
65-63-4Salvia.
65-65-6'Widow' (roll again if this hobbit couldn't have been widowed, for example because of age. Roll again on this table for the hobbit's real name. If their name is, for example, 'Daisy Tunnely', they will usually be known as 'Widow Tunnely' or 'the Widow Tunnely').
 
 
Names: Hobbits, Male
source or inspiration: James Hutchings, original information from J.R.R. Tolkien.
Thanks to Wikipedia for the lists that these tables are based on.
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
111-2Adalgrim.
113-4Adelard.
115-6Andwise.
121-2Bandobras.
123-4Bingo.
125-6Blanco.
131-2Bodo.
133-4Bowman.
135-6'Broadbelt' (nickname - roll again, ignoring this result or any other nickname, for this hobbit's real name).
141-2Bucca.
143-4Bungo.
145-6Carl.
151-2Cotman.
153-4Cottar.
155-6Dinodas.
161-2Doderic.
163-4Dodinas.
165-6Drogo.
211-2Dudo.
213-4Elfstan.
215-6Erling.
221-2Everard.
223-4Falco.
225-6'Farmer' (nickname - roll again, ignoring this result or any other nickname, for this hobbit's real name).
231-2Fastolph.
233-4Fastred.
235-6'Fatty' (nickname - roll again, ignoring this result or any other nickname, for this hobbit's real name).
241-2Ferdibrand.
243-4Ferdinand.
245-6Ferumbras.
251-2Filibert.
253-4Flambard.
255-6Folco.
261-2Fortinbras.
263-4Fosco.
265-6Fredegar.
311-2Gerontius.
313-4Gorbadoc.
315-6Gorbulas.
321-2Gorhendad.
323-4Gormadoc.
325-6Griffo.
331-2Halfred.
333-4Hamfast.
335-6Hamson.
341-2Harding.
343-4Hending.
345-6Hildibrand.
351-2Hildigrim.
353-4Hildilfons.
355-6Hob.
361-2Hobson.
363-4Holfast.
365-6Holman.
411-2Hugo.
413-4Ilberic.
415-6Isembard.
421-2Isembold.
423-4Isengar.
425-6Isengrim.
431-2Isumbras.
433-4'Jolly' (nickname - roll again, ignoring this result or any other nickname, for this hobbit's real name).
435-6Largo.
441-2Longo.
443-4Lotho.
445-6Madoc.
451-2Marmadas.
453-4Marmadoc.
455-6Marroc.
461-2Merimac.
463-4Merimas.
465-6Milo.
511-2Minto.
513-4Moro.
515-6Mosco.
521-2Mungo.
523-4Odo.
525-6Odovacar.
531-2Olo.
533-4Orgulas.
535-6Otho.
541-2Paladin.
543-4'Pimple' (nickname - roll again, ignoring this result or any other nickname, for this hobbit's real name).
545-6Polo.
551-2Ponto.
553-4Porto.
555-6Posco.
561-2'Proudneck' (nickname - roll again, ignoring this result or any other nickname, for this hobbit's real name).
563-4Reginard.
565-6Robin.
611-2Rorimac.
613-4Rowan.
615-6Rudigar.
621-2Rufus.
623-4Sadoc.
625-6Saradas.
631-2Saradoc.
633-4Seredic.
635-6Sigismond.
641-2Ted.
643-4Tobold.
645-6Togo.
651-2Tolman.
653-4Wilcome.
655-6Wilibald.
661-2Will.
663-4Wiseman.
665-6'Young' or 'Old' (depending on age - roll again, ignoring this result or any nickname, for this hobbit's real name. For example, if you roll Otho Bracegirdle, they are generally known as Young Otho Bracegirdle, presumably to distinguish them from 'Old Otho Bracegirdle', or vice versa).
 
 
Names: Hobbits, Last Names
source or inspiration: James Hutchings, original information from J.R.R. Tolkien.
Thanks to Wikipedia for the lists that these tables are based on.
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
11-21-2Banks.
11-23-4Boffin.
11-25-6Bolger.
13-41-2Bracegirdle.
13-43-4Brockhouse.
13-45-6Brown.
15-61-2Brownlock.
15-63-4Buckland.
15-65-6Bunce.
21-21-2Burrows.
21-23-4Bywater.
21-25-6Chubb.
23-41-2Clayhanger.
23-43-4Cotton.
23-45-6Delving.
25-61-2Diggle.
25-63-4Fairbairn.
25-65-6Fallowhide.
31-21-2Farthing.
31-23-4Farthingstone.
31-25-6Gammidge.
33-41-2Gamwich.
33-43-4Gardner.
33-45-6Goldworthy.
35-61-2Goodbody.
35-63-4Goodchild.
35-65-6Goodenough.
41-21-2Goold.
41-23-4Greenfields.
41-25-6Greenhand.
43-41-2Greenholm.
43-43-4Grubb.
43-45-6Hardbottle.
45-61-2Hayward.
45-63-4Hornblower.
45-65-6Lightfoot.
51-21-2Longbottom.
51-23-4Longholes.
51-25-6Maggot.
53-41-2Mugwort.
53-43-4Noakes.
53-45-6Oldbuck.
55-61-2Oldforest.
55-63-4Proudfoot.
55-65-6Roper.
61-21-2Rumble.
61-23-4Sackville.
61-25-6Sandheaver.
63-41-2Smallburrow.
63-43-4Stoor.
63-45-6Tunnelly.
65-61-2Twofoot.
65-63-4Underhill.
65-65-6Whitfoot.
 
 
Names: Martian, Structure
source or inspiration: Flynn
 
These names are based on those in the 'Mars' series by Edgar Rice Burroughs.

They can be used for both male and female characters.

A result of (A) means roll on 'Names: Martian A' below, and similar for (B).

If the result has more than one (A) or more than one (B), roll separately for each.
 
Roll 1 dice.
dice rollFirst NameSecond Name
1 or 2(A)(A)(B)
3(A)(B)(A)(B)
4 or 5(A)(B)none
6(A)none
 
 
Names: Martian A
source or inspiration: Flynn
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Am
12Banth
13Carth
14Dur
15Flor
16Gant
21Haj
22Ham
23Il
24Jad
25Kand
26Kant
31Lan
32Mat
33Nast
34Or
35Pand
36Parth
41Roj
42Sark
43Sol
44Sor
45Tal
46Tar
51Tark
52Tav
53Thor
54Thur
55Thuv
56Ul
61Um
62Val
63Vor
64Xax
65Yerst
66Zand
 
 
Names: Martian B
source or inspiration: Flynn
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11a
12ab
13ad
14ah
15ai
16aj
21ak
22al
23am
24an
25ang
26ar
31ark
32as
33at
34ed
35ek
36el
41i
42ia
43ion
44is
45o
46ok
51olian
52on
53or
54oris
55os
56u
61ul
62um
63un
64ur
65uren
66us
 
 
Names: Native American, Female (translated)
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Blood-Red.
12Bluebird.
13Bluebird Eye.
14Burning Fire.
15Corn Mother.
16Coyote Chasing Deer.
21Crow Mother Spirit.
22Deer Jumping Downhill.
23Dressed in Furs.
24Elk.
25Grandmother.
26Laughing Maiden.
31Leaping Water.
32New Moon.
33Night.
34Of the Wind.
35Owl.
36Protector.
41Rattlesnake Handler.
42Red Cloud At Sunset.
43Returning Moon.
44She Is Not Sterile.
45She Is Playful.
46She Who Bathes With Her Knees.
51Sight of Day.
52Sight of the Sun.
53Sings.
54Snake Flower.
55Snake Maiden.
56Spider-Woman At Middle Age.
61Stays At Home.
62Sweet Gum Tree.
63Turtle.
64Useful To All.
65Wears Red.
66White Buffalo.
 
 
Names: Native American, Male (translated)
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Ashamed.
12Bear Making Dust.
13Black Hoof.
14Canoe Man.
15Cheating.
16Cornstalk.
21Crier Chief.
22Dull Knife.
23Evil.
24Feathered Water Snake.
25Friend To Everyone.
26Has Three Fingers.
31He Fights.
32He Interrupts.
33He Keeps Watch.
34He Laughs.
35He Lies.
36He Lives Alone.
41He Sits At Home.
42He Who Whistles.
43Lean Bear.
44Little Robe.
45Little Wolf.
46Lives In the Forest.
51Locust.
52Mud Mound.
53Porcupine Bear.
54Screech Owl Spirit.
55Star Blanket.
56Talking Bird.
61Tall Bull.
62Wears A Red Shirt.
63Whirlwind.
64White Antelope.
65White Crow.
66Wild Condor.
 
 
Names: Orcs
source or inspiration: James Hutchings, original information from J.R.R. Tolkien.
Thanks to Wikipedia for the lists that these tables are based on.
 
These names are for both male and female orcs: Tolkien never mentions female orcs.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Azog.
13-4Balcmeg.
15-6roll again: 1-3 Boldog 4-6 Bolg.
21-2Golfimbul.
23-4Gorbag.
25-6Gorgol.
31-2Grishnakh.
33-4Lagduf.
35-6roll again: 1-3 Lug 4-6 Lugdush.
41-2Mauhur.
43-4Muzgash.
45-6Orcobal.
51-2Othrod.
53-4Radbug.
55-6Shagrat.
61-2Snaga.
63-4Ufthak.
65-6Ugluk.
 
 
Names: Star Wars, First Names A
source or inspiration: James Hutchings, original information from various creators.
Thanks to Wikipedia for the lists that these tables are based on.
 
First roll two dice. If the total is exactly 2 or 4, then the character has 3 elements in their first name. Roll on this table, then table B below, then table C, and combine in that order.
If the total is anything else, then the character has two elements in their name. Roll only on this table, then on table C below.
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
111-3Aay
114-6Ad
121-3Al
124-6Am
131-3An
134-6An
141-3Ar
144-6Bai
151-3Bai
154-6Ba
161-3Ba
164-6Be
211-3Be
214-6Bi
221-3Bo
224-6Bol
231-3Bor
234-6Boss
241-3Bre
244-6Bre
251-3Ca
254-6Car
261-3Clie
264-6Da
311-3Da
314-6De
321-3Den
324-6Do
331-3Fi
334-6Ga
341-3Gar
344-6Gree
351-3Ja
354-6Jab
361-3Jan
364-6Jo
411-3Jo
414-6Ken
421-3Klaa
424-6La
431-3Lan
434-6Log
441-3Lor
444-6Ma
451-3Ma
454-6Mo
461-3Mo
464-6Na
511-3Na
514-6Nu
521-3Ool
524-6Opp
531-3Ow
534-6Pad
541-3Pon
544-6Ray
551-3Roo
554-6Ru
561-3Ru
564-6Sa
611-3Sa
614-6Se
621-3Si
624-6Sta
631-3Tau
634-6Vi
641-3Wa
644-6Wu
651-3Ya
654-6Yo
661-3Za
664-6Ze
 
 
Names: Star Wars, First Names B
source or inspiration: James Hutchings, original information from various creators.
Thanks to Wikipedia for the lists that these tables are based on.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2ba
1-23-4bul
1-25-6don
3-41-2ed
3-43-4hi
3-45-6la
5-61-2rin
5-63-4ta
5-65-6til
 
 
Names: Star Wars, First Names C
source or inspiration: James Hutchings, original information from various creators.
Thanks to Wikipedia for the lists that these tables are based on.
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
111-3a.
114-6ba.
121-3ba.
124-6b.
131-3ch.
134-6ck.
141-3d.
144-6da.
151-3da.
154-6da.
161-3dal.
164-6dan.
211-3dan.
214-6do.
221-3do.
224-6do.
231-3elle.
234-6en.
241-3gar.
244-6gg.
251-3go.
254-6gor.
261-3ha.
264-6her.
311-3i.
314-6k.
321-3k.
324-6kin.
331-3l.
334-6l.
341-3la.
344-6les.
351-3lim.
354-6list.
361-3lux.
364-6m.
411-3m.
414-6ma.
421-3maw.
424-6m.
431-3mus.
434-6n.
441-3n.
444-6n.
451-3n.
454-6na.
461-3na.
464-6ne.
511-3n.
514-6nis.
521-3o.
524-6o.
531-3pa.
534-6ra.
541-3ray.
544-6rb.
551-3ris.
554-6ru.
561-3s.
564-6s.
611-3s.
614-6si.
621-3ss.
624-6ta.
631-3te.
634-6th.
641-3to or tto.
644-6tu.
651-3v.
654-6vel.
661-3vin.
664-6vo.
 
 
Names: Star Wars, Last Names A
source or inspiration: James Hutchings, original information from various creators.
Thanks to Wikipedia for the lists that these tables are based on.
 
First roll two dice. If the total is exactly 7 or 10, then the character has 3 elements in their last name. Roll on this table, then table B below, then table B again, and combine in that order.
If the total is exactly 4, then the character has four elements in their name. Roll on table A, table B, table A, table B.
If the total is anything else, then the character's last name has two elements. Roll on table A then table B.
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
11-21-2Ack
11-23-4Al
11-25-6Am
13-41-2Ba
13-43-4Bib
13-45-6Bib
15-61-2Bil
15-63-4Cal
15-65-6Cho
21-21-2Cry
21-23-4Da
21-25-6Da
23-41-2Daa
23-43-4Der
23-45-6Dis
25-61-2Doo
25-63-4Ev
25-65-6Ev
31-21-2Fel
31-23-4For
31-25-6Gal
33-41-2Gol
33-43-4Gun
33-45-6Gun
35-61-2Haa
35-63-4Jam
35-65-6Ju
41-21-2Kli
41-23-4Li
41-25-6Li
43-41-2Mot
43-43-4Moth
43-45-6Mun
45-61-2Na
45-63-4Nee
45-65-6Nee
51-21-2O
51-23-4Or
51-25-6Pal
53-41-2Pan
53-43-4Ral
53-45-6Ral
55-61-2Re
55-63-4Riee
55-65-6Se
61-21-2Se
61-23-4Si
61-25-6Si
63-41-2Tar
63-43-4Ter
63-45-6Va
65-61-2Win
65-63-4Zu
65-65-6Zu
 
 
Names: Star Wars, Last Names B
source or inspiration: James Hutchings, original information from various creators.
Thanks to Wikipedia for the lists that these tables are based on.
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
11-21-2a.
11-23-4a.
11-25-6a.
13-41-2an.
13-43-4an.
13-45-6ba.
15-61-2ba.
15-63-4bar.
15-65-6ble.
21-21-2bo.
21-23-4ca.
21-25-6cu.
23-41-2da.
23-43-4da.
23-45-6di.
25-61-2don.
25-63-4du.
25-65-6ga.
31-21-2i.
31-23-4il.
31-25-6ka.
33-41-2ka.
33-43-4kan.
33-45-6ko.
35-61-2ku.
35-63-4kuss or ckuss.
35-65-6la.
41-21-2la.
41-23-4la.
41-25-6li.
43-41-2lie.
43-43-4lin.
43-45-6lor.
45-61-2ma.
45-63-4mas.
45-65-6na.
51-21-2na.
51-23-4nes.
51-25-6nyd.
53-41-2pa.
53-43-4pals.
53-45-6ra.
55-61-2ra.
55-63-4ray.
55-65-6rik.
61-21-2ris.
61-23-4sik.
61-25-6ter.
63-41-2th.
63-43-4ti.
63-45-6tu.
65-61-2um.
65-63-4vi.
65-65-6zan.
 
 
Names: Welsh, Female
source or inspiration: Abulafia, under the terms of their Creative Commons license.
 
Meanings are in brackets.

The prefix 'verch' means 'daughter of'. For example, Bannon verch Baden is 'Bannon, daughter of Baden' (note that it was much more common to reference the father's than the mother's name).
You may roll again on this table or the one below to get the character's parent's name.
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
11-21-2Adain (winged).
11-23-4Adara (bird-catcher).
11-25-6Adyna (wretched).
13-41-2Aelwyd (from the hearth).
13-43-4Angharad (greatly loved one).
13-45-6Annwyl (beloved).
15-61-2Arthes (she-bear).
15-63-4Banon (queen).
15-65-6Bethan (consecrated to God).
21-21-2Blodwen (flower).
21-23-4Braith (freckled).
21-25-6Branwen (white bosomed).
23-41-2Cadwyn (bright chain).
23-43-4Caethes (slave).
23-45-6Cath (cat).
25-61-2Ceridwen (holy song).
25-63-4Cerwen (black-haired).
25-65-6Dee (sorrow).
31-21-2Delyth (pretty).
31-23-4Dera (wild spirit).
31-25-6Derwen (oak tree).
33-41-2Efa (life).
33-43-4Eirianwen (splendid).
33-45-6Enid (soulful).
35-61-2Ffraid (saintly).
35-63-4Glenys (riverbank).
35-65-6Gorawen (joy).
41-21-2Gwenhwyfar (holy light).
41-23-4Gwladys (sovereign).
41-25-6Hafgan (summer song).
43-41-2Heledd (goodness).
43-43-4Hellawes (enchantress).
43-45-6Heuldys (sun rising on a hill).
45-61-2Iola (worth).
45-63-4Lysanor (maiden).
45-65-6Mab (baby).
51-21-2Maelona (divine princess).
51-23-4Mair (bitter).
51-25-6Meira (sea-bright).
53-41-2Myfanwy (rare).
53-43-4Nesta (troublesome beauty).
53-45-6Neued (maiden).
55-61-2Owena (born to nobility).
55-63-4Penarddun (obedient).
55-65-6Rhan (fate).
61-21-2Rhiannon (divine queen).
61-23-4Rhonwen (bright spear).
61-25-6Rowena (white-haired).
63-41-2Saeth (arrow).
63-43-4Sioned (simple).
63-45-6Tegwen (radiant beauty).
65-61-2Vala (chosen).
65-63-4Vanora (white wave).
65-65-6Ysbail (consecrated to God).
 
 
Names: Welsh, Male
source or inspiration: Abulafia, under the terms of their Creative Commons license.
 
Meanings are in brackets.

The prefix 'ap' means 'son of'. For example, Baden ap Wynn is 'Baden, the son of Wynn'.
You may roll again on this table to get the character's father's name.
Sometimes a person's name would also refer to their grandfather, for example 'Baden ap Wynn ap Angor'.
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
111-3Aberthol (sacrifice).
114-6Accalon (champion).
121-3Addolgar (devout).
124-6Adwr (coward).
131-3Alwyn (friend of all).
134-6Anfri (disgrace).
141-3Angor (anchor).
144-6Anwell (beloved).
151-3Arddur (bear).
154-6Ardwyad (protector).
161-3Arian (silver).
164-6Arvel (wept over).
211-3Avagdu (utter darkness).
214-6Baden (brother).
221-3Bleiddian (wolf-raider).
224-6Bradwr (traitor).
231-3Bran (raven).
234-6Cadfan (battle summit).
241-3Cadoc (eager for war).
244-6Cadwallen (battle dissolver).
251-3Caerwyn (shining fort).
254-6Calder (rushing brook).
261-3Caradoc (beloved).
264-6Collen (hazel tree).
311-3Conwy (hound of the plain).
314-6Corryn (spider).
321-3Dafydd (dearly beloved).
324-6Deverell (from the riverbank).
331-3Drystan (full of sorrow).
334-6Edmyg (honor).
341-3Emlyn (waterfall).
344-6Fyrsil (bears the staff).
351-3Gerwin (fair love).
354-6Gethin (dark).
361-3Glyn (valley-dweller).
364-6Gorsedd (from the mound).
411-3Gower (pure).
414-6Gruffen (fierce lord).
421-3Gwallter (strong fighter).
424-6Gwern (old).
431-3Gwyn (white and shining).
434-6Hafgan (summer song).
441-3Heddwyn (shining peace).
444-6Howell (alert one).
451-3Huw (intelligent).
454-6Hywel (eminent).
461-3Idris (eager lord).
464-6Llywelyn (leader).
511-3Lug (bringer of light).
514-6Madog (fortunate).
521-3Maelgwn (prince of the hounds).
524-6March (horse).
531-3Meurig (dark skinned).
534-6Morthwyl (hammer).
541-3Nona (saintly).
544-6Olwydd (tracker).
551-3Padrig (noble).
554-6Pawl (little).
561-3Pedr (rock).
564-6Pellyn (lake's headland).
611-3Pennar (high hill).
614-6Peredur (hard spear).
621-3Prydwen (handsome).
624-6Rhain (spear).
631-3Rhobert (brilliant).
634-6Sayer (carpenter).
641-3Selwyn (holy love).
644-6Taff (beloved).
651-3Tarrant (thunder).
654-6Teryrnon (divine prince).
661-3Trahern (strong as iron).
664-6Wynn (fair one).
 
 
Item Types
source or inspiration: Labyrinth Lord
 
Once you've determined the item, you may roll to see if it's magical
1-5 no 6 yes - except for wands and scrolls, which are always magical,
and bags of powder (roll on their table below)

Most items also have some chance of having one or more precious stones in them.
If the item is a rope, sack, hat, glass eyes, bag of powder, or scroll, it has no chance.
Otherwise, roll 1 dice: 1-4 nothing 5 one precious stone 6 roll one dice, and the item has that many precious stones (all the same type).
If necessary, roll on the 'Precious and Semi-Precious Stones' table below to decide what type.
 
Roll 2 dice, then a 3rd if necessary.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
11-2no need to roll againarmour
13-41-2armour
13-43-4bow
13-45-6arrows
15-6no need to roll againhelmet
21-21-2comb
21-23-4sling
21-25-6spear (roll again: 1-2 can only be used hand-to-hand 3-4 can only be thrown 5-6 can be used at close range or thrown)
23-4no need to roll againshield
25-61-2shield
25-63-4war hammer
25-65-6axe
31-2no need to roll againsword
33-41-2sword
33-43-4belt
33-45-6boots
35-6no need to roll againpotion
41-21-2potion
41-23-4cloak
41-25-6gloves
43-4no need to roll againscroll
45-61-2tapestry
45-63-4necklace
45-65-6bell
51-2no need to roll againwand
53-41-2wand
53-43-4bowl
53-45-6broom
55-6no need to roll againring
61-21-2carpet
61-23-4crystal ball
61-25-6musical instrument (roll on the Musical Instruments table for what type)
63-41-2powder (in a bag)
63-43-4glass eyes
63-45-6mirror
65-61-2rope
65-63-4sack
65-65-6hat
 
 
Precious and Semi-Precious Stones
source or inspiration: ZeFRS
 
This table can give widely different results. GMs may want to first decide on the total value, then generate precious stones to that total.

The 'value' is in the standard coin of your game world, for example gold pieces.
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresultvalue
1-21-21-2agatehalf.
1-21-23-4garnet1
1-21-25-6mother-of-pearl1
1-23-41-2quartz2
1-23-43-4amber3
1-23-45-6chalcedony4
1-25-61-2coral5
1-25-63-4jet5
1-25-65-6lapis lazuli7
3-41-21-2as above.
3-41-23-4malachite7
3-41-25-6as above.
3-43-41-2onyx8
3-43-43-4as above.
3-43-45-6turquoise10
3-45-61-2as above.
3-45-63-4aquamarine20
3-45-65-6as above.
5-61-21-2pearl100
5-61-23-4opal150
5-61-25-6sapphire300
5-63-41-2topaz300
5-63-43-4amethyst500
5-63-45-6jade750
5-65-61-2ruby1000
5-65-63-4emerald2000
5-65-65-6diamond3000
 
 
Magic Armour, Helmets and Shields
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1The armour gives greater protection than normal armour of its type.
2The armour gives the same protection as normal armour of its type, but is lighter and easier to wear.
3The armour gives the same protection as normal armour of its type, but gives greater protection against a particular type of enemy (if your game is using the Creature tables, optionally the GM may roll 1 dice for what type of creature: 1 Monsters 2 Animates 3 Spirits 4 Beasts 5 Folk 6 humans).
4as above.
5The armour gives the same protection as normal armour of its type, and grants another ability - roll on the Blessings table.
6The armour gives inferior protection to normal armour of its type, but grants another ability - roll on the Blessings table.
 
 
Magic Carpets
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Flies (roll again: 1-2 anyone can make it fly by willing it to do so. Keeping it airborne requires one person's full attention. 3-4 as for 1-2, but only those with enough intelligence, willpower or magical ability - whichever is appropriate to your game - can successfully make it fly 5-6 the carpet has its own personality. It will usually cooperate with its 'owner', but may need to be persuaded).
2Portable trap: When any living thing steps on it, they will sink into it as if it were a pit of quicksand. The carpet can still be wrapped up and carried like a normal carpet.
3The carpet gives out an aura of homeliness, which might cause creatures near it to refrain from violence and feel relaxed and safe. The longer the carpet has stayed, unrolled, in the one place, the more likely it is to work.
4The design on the carpet changes, giving warnings and clues.
5Grants another ability - roll on the Blessings table.
6Grants another ability - roll on the Blessings table.
 
 
Magic Brooms
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Flies (roll again: 1-2 anyone can make it fly by willing it to do so. Keeping it airborne requires one person's full attention. 3-4 as for 1-2, but only those with enough intelligence, willpower or magical ability - whichever is appropriate to your game - can successfully make it fly 5-6 the broom has its own personality. It will usually cooperate with its 'owner', but may need to be persuaded).
2If used to sweep any surface, it will 'clean' it of traps.
3it can be used to 'shoo' away any creature the size of a human child or less.
4If swept over a creature's skin, it will 'clean' away the ugliness, making them temporarily more attractive.
5Grants another ability - roll on the Blessings table.
6Grants another ability - roll on the Blessings table.
 
 
Magic Mirrors 1: powers
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
The GM should also roll to see if the mirror is alive (1-3 yes, 4-6 no).
If it is, the spirit of the mirror will appear as the reflection of whoever's holding it.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Anyone who fails to resist it will look into the mirror, regardless of what else is happening. Unintelligent creatures may try and attack their reflection.
2If someone holding the mirror is wounded, sometimes the reflection will be wounded instead. The mirror loses all magic if the reflection 'dies'. The reflection 'heals' at the same rate as whoever's holding it. It can't, and doesn't need to, eat or sleep. The reflection may benefit from magical healing, but spells cast on the holder don't affect the reflection or vice versa.
3The reflection may cast spells that are opposite of any spells the holder can cast. The holder pays whatever the cost of casting the spell is.
4Roll on the Blessings table.
5Roll on the Blessings table.
6Roll on the Blessings table.
 
 
Magic Mirrors 2: drawbacks
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1No drawback.
2If the mirror is alive, the spirit of the mirror will become jealous of other reflections (eg lakes, normal mirrors, polished surfaces etc) and will try and stop the person who holds it casting such reflections, or may refuse to help if they do. If the mirror isn't alive, no drawback.
3If the mirror is alive, the spirit of the mirror will want to take over the identity of whoever looks into it, and will try and trick the holder into allowing this to happen. Roll again to see how this can happen: 1-2 if the mirror is placed so that someone who's held it for a certain length of time is reflected in it while they sleep, 3-4 by finding another such mirror, and holding them facing each other, 5-6 by the holder changing their clothes so that everything on the left side is now on the right and vice versa, or writing their name backwards. If the mirror isn't alive, no drawback.
4The holder will, unless strong of will, spend more and more time looking into the mirror.
5If the mirror is broken, the holder (or the last person to hold it) will be seriously wounded.
6If the same person holds it for a long time, their reflections other than in the mirror (eg in lakes, normal mirrors, polished surfaces) will start to have wills of their own.
 
 
Musical Instruments
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Drums.
2Lute.
3Dulcimer.
4Lyre.
5Flute.
6Pan Pipes.
 
 
Magic Musical Instruments 1: who can use
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1-2Anyone, even those who normally couldn't play it.
3-4Only those of the required class (if your game uses classes), or with the required skill (if your game uses skills) - for example, only bards, or only those with a 'play music' skill.
5-6Anyone who makes a successful check on a particular attribute (for example Dexterity).
 
 
Magic Musical Instruments 2: power
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
In addition to their power, the GM may optionally make another roll:
if this comes up 1, the instrument will only play merry jigs. If it comes up 6, the instrument will only play solemn airs.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Anyone who fails to resist it must dance.
2Anyone who hears it feels refreshed and brave.
3It produces music like that played by a master musician.
4It mesmerises one kind of beast.
5It's an anti-instrument: instead of sound, playing it produces silence.
6Roll on the Blessings table below.
 
 
Magic Musical Instruments 3: alive?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1no.
2no.
3no.
4no.
5The instrument is posessed by the spirit of a great musician.
6The instrument itself is alive and intelligent.
 
 
Scrolls or Wands
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1-2The scroll has the secrets of several spells; however characters may only use them if they have the ability to learn those kinds of spells.
3-4The scroll has a spell, which anyone can use, even if they normally couldn't learn this spell.
5-6The scroll grants another ability - roll on the Blessings table.
 
 
Magic Weapons 1: Hand-to-Hand Weapons
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
For spears that can be both used hand-to-hand and thrown,
roll on the 'Ranged' table below rather than this one.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Roll again: 1-3 the weapon does more damage than a normal example of its type 4-6 the weapon has the same effect as if it was covered in poison.
2The weapon is lighter and easier to use than a normal example of its type. Examples: in a game where magicians can't use swords, a sword which actually can be used by magicians. In a game where weapons require a minimum level of Strength, a staff which requires far less Strength than normal staves.
3The weapon is more likely to hit than a normal example of its type.
4The weapon acts as a normal example of its type, but is more likely to hit and does more damage against a particular type of enemy (if your game is using the Creature tables, optionally the GM may roll 1 dice for what type of creature: 1 Monsters 2 Animates 3 Spirits 4 Beasts 5 Folk 6 humans).
5The weapon acts as a normal example of its type, and also grants another power - roll on the Blessings table.
6The weapon exists in both the mortal and spirit worlds. Thus, it can do damage to creatures like ghosts who are normally immune to mortal weapons.
 
 
Magic Weapons 2: Ranged Weapons
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table may be used for weapons or ammunition (for example, both for magic bows and magic arrows).
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Roll again 1-3 the item does more damage than a normal example of its type 4-6 the weapon has the same effect as if it was covered in poison.
14-6The item is lighter and easier to use than a normal example of its type. Examples: in a game where magicians can't use longbows, a longbow which actually can be used by magicians. In a game where longbows require a minimum level of Strength, a longbow which requires far less Strength. If the item is ammunition, this may apply to the weapon it's fired from: for example, an arrow may lower the Strength requirement to use a bow to fire it.
21-3The item is more accurate than a normal example of its type.
24-6The item acts as a normal example of its type, but is more likely to hit and does more damage against a particular type of enemy (if your game is using the Creature tables, optionally the GM may roll 1 dice for what type of creature: 1 Monsters 2 Animates 3 Spirits 4 Beasts 5 Folk 6 humans).
31-3The item acts as a normal example of its type, and also grants another power - roll on the Blessings table.
34-6The weapon exists in both the mortal and spirit worlds. Thus, it can do damage to creatures like ghosts who are normally immune to mortal weapons.
41-3The item seeks out exposed flesh. If it's used against an opponent that isn't completely covered in armour, it's likely to be treated as if the opponent wasn't wearing any armour. Creatures which aren't made of flesh, for example golems, will be immune.
44-6The item has more range than a normal example of its type.
51-3Those who wield it may aim and fire far more quickly than normal.
54-6When fired, the ammunition emits an unearthly shriek that strikes fear into its enemies. For a weapon, it will have this effect on any ammunition fired from it. For a spear, it will only have this effect when thrown, not when used hand-to-hand.
61-3If the item is a weapon that requires ammunition, such as a crossbow or bow, it grows its own ammunition. If the item is ammunition, for example an arrow or throwing spear, it breeds new examples of its type if placed alone with another of the same type. Re-roll if the item is a sling, because slings use stones, which are usually readily available anyway.
64-6The item has influence over others of its kind. An opponent using the same type of item will find it far more difficult to hit anyone who carries this item. If the item is ammunition and it's used, the effect will continue until the end of that battle.
 
 
Bags of Powder
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1The powder has a magical effect when eaten - roll on the 'Blessings' table below.
2As above, but the effect happens with the powder is spread on the skin.
3The powder is an ingredient in a medicine. The powder has no medical effect in its current form.
4The powder is an ingredient in a spell. The powder has no magical effect in its current form.
5The powder is a herb or spice (optionally, roll on the 'Herbs and Spices' table below).
6The powder is poison (roll again: 1-3 when eaten or inhaled, 4-6 on contact with skin).
 
 
Herbs and Spices
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2cinnamon.
13-4cloves.
15-6cumin.
21-2ginger.
23-4grains of paradise.
25-6liquorice.
31-2mustard seeds.
33-4nutmeg.
35-6pepper (roll again: 1-2 black 3-4 white 5-6 green).
41-2peppermint.
43-4salt.
45-6star anise.
51-2strawberry leaves.
53-4sweet cicely.
55-6tea bush.
61-2thyme.
63-4witch-hazel.
65-6wormwood.
 
 
Magic Hats
source or inspiration: zanshin from the Trollbridge forum.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Guard's Helm: Projects a forcefield around the user, which acts as armour. The user may wear normal armour as well. It also increases the wearer's endurance.
2Wizard's Hat: Increases the wearer's ability to cast and resist magic.
3General's Helm: Increases the wearer's ability to resist fear and mind control, and to intimidate and lead others.
4Thief's Hood: When the wearer wishes it, it will be difficult or impossible for anyone who doesn't know them personally to remember anything about their appearance, beyond their species and gender.
5Swashbuckler's Feathered Hat: The wearer has a higher chance of success when attempting acrobatic feats (including in combat), but only for feats which are sufficiently dangerous.
6Hat of Plenty: Once a day a meal can be taken from the hat.
 
 
Blessings
source or inspiration: Labyrinth Lord
 
This table can be used for the properties of magic items, or for other benign magic effects.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Ability to control a particular species of animal or monster.
12Ability to control plants.
13Ability to take on a particular animal form. Usually grants some of the powers of that animal (eg for birds, the ability to fly).
14Inhumanly good hearing.
15Inhumanly good sight.
16Inhumanly good climbing ability.
21Increased speed.
22The ability to shrink to a tenth of normal size.
23Wounds will heal faster than normal.
24The ability to fly at the same speed, and causing the same fatigue, as walking or running the same distance across flat, open terrain. If the person with this power is on a horse, then horse and rider can fly at the speed of a galloping horse, and the horse gets tired rather than the rider.
25The ability take on a gas-like form, flowing under doors or avoiding damage (equipment and clothes are not effected, the magic item itself is).
26Increased size and strength.
31Increased courage, and become more intimidating.
32Invisibility.
33Skin gives protection as if it was very light armour.
34Resistance to poison, and increased ability to detect poison.
35Ability to smell gold (not treasure in general).
36Ability to summon a useful supernatural creature (eg a genie).
41Ability to walk on water.
42Ability to see through walls.
43Resistance to magic.
44Resistance to cold, and less likely to be attacked by creatures who are native to cold climates.
45Ability to carry far more bulk and weight than would be normal.
46Ability to teleport small distances.
51Invulnerability to non-magical fire.
52Ability to breathe underwater, improved swimming ability, and less likely to be attacked by sea creatures.
53Increased ability to find food and water and sense danger in forests, and less likely to be attacked by creatures native to forests.
54Increased ability to find food and water and sense danger in deserts, and less likely to be attacked by creatures native to deserts.
55Increased ability to find food and water and sense danger in mountains, and less likely to be attacked by creatures native to mountains.
56Ability to speak extra languages.
61Increased ability to sense lies.
62Ability to move silently.
63Ability to see in darkness.
64Mysterious Knowledge: Once per day, the bearer of this item may ask the GM one question. The question must be able to be answered with a 'yes' or a 'no'. The player can use 'out of character knowledge' in framing the question.
65Roll again, but the magic item is alive and intelligent (this may be a help or hinderance).
66as above.
 
 
Weather
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 3 dice, and look up the total in the column for the approprite season. This table assumes that the area has a wide variety of weather, from heatwaves to snow.

Snow: roll 1 dice, and multiply the result by 10 to get the resulting depth of snow in centimetres. Roll 1 dice and multiply by 4 to get the depth in inches.

To see if the weather is the same the next day, roll 1 dice:
Summer or Winter:
1-3 same weather as yesterday.
4-6 roll again on the weather chart.
Spring or Autumn:
1-2 same weather as yesterday.
3-6 roll again on the weather chart.
 
season
dice rollSpringSummerAutumn/FallWinter
3HotHeatwaveHotSunny
4SunnyHotSunnyBright
5SunnyHotBrightBreezy
6BrightSunnyBreezyDull
7BrightSunnyDullMist
8BreezyBrightDullWindy
9DullBrightMistOvercast
10DullBreezyMistOvercast
11MistDullWindyLight Rain
12WindyMistOvercastHeavy Rain
13OvercastWindyLight RainHeavy Rain
14Light RainOvercastHeavy RainFog
15Light RainLight RainHeavy RainFog
16Heavy RainLight RainFogSleet
17FogHeavy RainFogSnow
18SleetFogSleetSnow
 
 
Trial Results
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
The GM should usually modify the results of this table depending on the severity of the crime, whether the accused is likeable and believable, whether they're innocent, bribery if relevant, and the quality of legal argument on both sides.
Heavy Fine - ranges from 100 gold pieces for a peasant, to 600 for a noble.
If you don't want to make it dependent on social class, roll 1 dice and multiply by 100.
Light Fine - ranges from 3 or 4 gold pieces for a peasant, up to roughly 20 for a noble.
If you don't want to make it dependent on social class, roll 2 dice and multiply one by the other.
Compensation - ranges from 10 gold pieces for a peasant, up to 60 for a noble.
If you don't want to make it dependent on social class, roll 1 dice and multiply by 10.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Death - roll on the Methods of Execution Table below.
13-4Mutilated - roll on the Mutilation table below.
15-6Tortured.
21-2Enslaved for 4-24 years (roll 4 dice).
23-4Jailed - roll on the Jail Sentence Length table below, and multiply by 5.
25-6Hard labour for the government for 1-6 years (roll 1 dice).
31-2Jailed - roll on the Jail Sentence Length table below, and multiply by 3.
33-4Jailed - roll on the Jail Sentence Length table below, and multiply by 2.
35-6Jailed - roll on the Jail Sentence Length table below.
41-2Exiled from the area.
43-4Whipped.
45-6In the stocks for 2-12 days (roll 2 dice.
51-2In the stocks for 1-6 days (roll 1 dice).
53-4Heavy Fine - see notes.
55-6Light Fine - see notes.
61-2Found Innocent.
63-4Found Innocent, and no record kept.
65-6Found Innocent, no record kept, and paid compensation (see notes).
 
 
Jail Sentence Length
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Generally the GM should multiply the result here by a factor of up to 5, depending on the seriousness of the crime.
If you're sent to this table from the Trial Results table, it will tell you what to multiply the result by.
 
Roll 2 dice, use the total.
2One day.
3One week.
4Two weeks.
5One month.
6Six months.
7One year.
8Two years.
9Three years.
10Five years.
11Ten years.
12Twenty years.
 
 
Mutilation
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
This table may be used to generate a random punishment, or to personalise NPCs.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Finger.
2Hand.
3Arm.
4Nose.
5Ear.
6Eye.
 
 
Methods of Execution
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Torn apart by four horses.
14-6Smothered.
21-3Impaled.
24-6Hurled from a catapult.
31-3Beheaded.
34-6Shot with arrows.
41-3Drowned.
44-6Burnt at the stake.
51-3Hanged.
54-6Sent to the gladiatorial arena.
61-3Drawn and quartered.
64-6Some form of execution unique to the area, and usually magical or mechanical - for example death by clockwork ogre.
 
 
City Rumours
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Members of a new gang have blocked a street and demand a toll from all who pass.
12A master thief has seen the face of the ruler of the city, and yet lived.
13An annoying beggar has just been turned into a frog.
14A body has been pulled from the river, the name of an ancient and evil god carved into its forehead.
15A beggar knows a secret entrance into the palace dungeons.
16A goblin has been seen flying around a wizards tower using a pair of artificial wings.
21The heads of the Assassins Guild meet every week in the back room of a local inn.
22This morning a wine merchant found a strange potion in one of his shipments.
23An eagle has just carried off a baby from a balcony.
24The landlord of a local inn is really a werewolf.
25A merchant has just been robbed of a massive gem by a trained monkey.
26A pirate galley has sunk, blocking the harbour mouth.
31A cart overturned in the high street, releasing a small dragon.
32A merchant is looking for bodyguards for a journey through wild hills.
33The ruler of the city has just left port in his galley, for some piracy.
34Someone is putting poison in the beer in both of two rival pubs.
35A wizard has just turned the Captain of the City Guard into a pig.
36A flower shop has a hoard of treasure hidden in its cellar.
41A covered wagon has overturned, spilling hundreds of 3 silver piece coins into the street. The city doesnt have a 3 silver piece coin.
42An aged, foreign sage is gathering mercenaries for a dangerous expedition into the desert.
43A master thief will be executed by being hurled out of a catapult at noon tomorrow unless he can prove his innocence.
44A new playwright has set the stage on fire, literally.
45A new tax starts today on all magicians. Many are trying to get themselves re-classified as astrologers or fortune tellers.
46Prominent thieves are looking for someone without scruples, for a dangerous job.
51An evil sorcerer is terrorising a small town nominally ruled by the city.
52Last night a mysterious elf bet their life and won 50,000 gold pieces.
53A number of half-fish, half-humans have been seen around the river bank at dusk.
54The house of an alchemist has just disappeared in a cloud of purple and green smoke.
55A candle maker has hundreds of gold thousands of gold pieces hidden around his house, each coin in a different place.
56Drinking ten mugs of the house ale at a local pub gives you the strength of a giant.
61A moneylender is looking for someone discreet, for a 'delicate' job.
62A spice-merchant is a collector of rare magical items.
63Two dozen of the City Guard have been executed for holding on to tax money.
64A local lamplighter is the person to talk to if you want information on those who come out at night.
65An evil temple wants someone to retrieve an ancient scroll from the sewers.
66A famous foreign gladiator is appearing at the arena tonight.
 
 
This Society Most Resembles...
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Ancient Greece.
13-4Ancient Rome.
15-6Ancient Egypt.
21-2Ancient India.
23-4Medieval Scandinavia.
25-6Medieval Britain.
31-2Medieval Japan.
33-4Renaissance Europe.
35-6Native Americans.
41-2Aztecs or Incas.
43-4Roll again - 1-2 Soviet Russia, 3-4 Nazi Germany, 5-6 the world of '1984'.
45-6An anarchist/socialist utopia, combined with the hobbits from 'Lord of the Rings'.
51-2A brutal 'war of all against all'.
53-4An ant hill.
55-6A herd of deer.
61-2A farm.
63-4Roll again, ignoring this result - but the society is as different as can be imagined to the result, rather than resembling it.
65-6Roll twice more, ignoring this result.
 
 
Last Words
source or inspiration: One Horse Town
Thanks to RPGPundit and Forward...to Adventure!
 
Roll 3 dice, use the total.
3I just washed that shirt!
4Now youll never find the treasure, fools.
5Oh.
6This is just the beginning. Soon, you will learn the true meaning of fear!
7I lay a pox on you and yours. You will never know peace until I am avenged. Everything you touch will turn to dust; all of your endeavours will be for nought. For seven times seven years, this will be so. The lamentation of your women will ring in my ears, even though the veil of death separates me from your suffering. Swords will shatter, oaths will be broken and faith will vanish. Ha, ha, ha, ha!
8Find the chalice! Find...the...chalice and take it to the...
9I didnt do it ma!
10So, I am done and you have won. Enjoy your victory fools, for even now Insert name of an NPC ally of the party languishes in my Lords secret fortress. Seven days hence, he will be slain, should I not send word of my victory. You have won the battle, but not the war.
11Fools! You think that you have slain me. Me! My heart resides in a gilded box guarded by the fiercest warriors. Tomorrow, at sunrise, I shall arise again and I will find you. Be sure of that. 'Till tomorrow.
12Huh, slain by chattels. I lay the mark of Taleth upon you, so that all will know of your deeds.
13If, I can just reach...the...lever. Minions! Quick, come to...me...unleash the...dogs...uh.
14Claret, everywhere...Pretty. Like the raiment of the radiant...uh.
15Well done, brave heroes. You have slain me, my congratulations on your monumental achievement. I would like a statue raised on this spot, if you have the time. I planned to do the same for you.
16Fly my beauties! Fly into the night! You are free. The spirits of Broman-Dar have been released from the prison of my flesh this night, my friends. May fire and darkness follow their progress.
17Mortally wounded! My heart doth beat slower and my breath doth rattle betwixt my chattering teeth. Farewell cruel world, may it treat thee and thou better than it has treated me...Arghh.
18Your faces are ingrained in my memory and your deeds in my heart. I shall return when the blue moon rises and the red bull enters the chambers of the prophet. Then history itself will reverse and this deed will be undone. I will see you again.
 
 
Hindquarters of a Centaur
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Horse (optionally, roll on the Horse Colour table below).
2as above.
3Donkey the centaur will be likely to be less susceptible to fear and intimidation than most centaurs.
4Zebra the centaur will be likely to be more attractive, but worse at hiding than most centaurs.
5Camel the centaur will be likely to be able to survive in the desert and go without water for longer than most centaurs.
6Mountain goat the centaur will be likely to be better at climbing than most centaurs.
 
 
Horse Colour
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table may also be used for the horse parts of centaurs, and other creatures.

Grey: grey horses don't have grey hairs. They have white hairs mixed with coloured ones, like a person with 'grey hair'. Optionally, roll again for the other colour (1 black 2 light chestnut 3 dark chestnut 4 light bay 5 dark bay 6 palomino). Greys (including dapple greys), are born with a coloured coat which gets whiter as they get older; again like people, except that it begins sooner in the horses life. This process begins on the face. An older grey horse may be indistinguishable from a white one, except that a grey horse has dark skin whereas a white horse has pink skin. The difference is particularly visible around the eyes and muzzle.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2black.
13-4as above.
15-6light chestnut (light brown).
21-2as above.
23-4dark chestnut (dark brown).
25-6as above.
31-2light bay (light brown body, black 'points' - mane, tail, and lower legs).
33-4as above.
35-6dark bay (dark brown body, black 'points' - mane, tail, and lower legs).
41-2as above.
43-4white.
45-6grey - see note above.
51-2dapple grey (grey, with patterns of round white spots) - see note above.
53-4palomino (yellow-tan body, white mane and tail).
55-6blue roan (a mixed pattern of black and white hairs, except that the head and 'points' - mane, tail and lower legs - are black).
61-2bay roan (a mixed pattern of brown and white hairs, except that the head is brown, and the 'points' - mane, tail and lower legs - are black).
63-4leopard (white with coloured spots - roll again for the colour of the spots: 1 black 2 light chestnut 3 dark chestnut 4 light bay 5 dark bay 6 palomino. The mane and tail will be coloured as for the spot colour; remember that bays have black manes and tails, and palominos have white manes and tails).
65-6snowflake (as above, except the horse is mostly coloured, with white spots).
 
 
Fairy Wings
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Butterfly.
2Dragonfly (four semi-transperant wings).
3Roll again: 1-3 bat 4-6 moth (like butterfly wings, but not brighly coloured).
4Wingless: they fly entirely by magic.
5Wingless: they fly on the backs of birds.
6Wingless: they fly on ragwort stems.
 
 
Magic Ships
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Can also fly.
2Folds up and fits into a pocket.
3Carried in a bottle grows to normal size when the bottle is smashed. If a giant bottle can somehow be built around the ship, the ship and bottle will shrink to its original size (also shrinking anyone on the ship at the time)..
4Sails as fast as if it had a fair wind, regardless of the weather.
5All who crew it will act as expert sailors, regardless of their actual skill, as if they were aided by the benevolent spirits of its former crew.
6Is likely to sail to where the ship wants to go, rather than where you want to go, and regardless of whether the map says the journey is possible.
 
 
Physical Henchman Quirk
source or inspiration: Fell
Thanks to RPGPundit and Forward...to Adventure!
 
If you get the result 'unnatural hair colour', roll another dice:
1 - Pink
2 - Blue
3 - Green
4 - Steel
5 - Gun Metal
6 - Roll twice more, ignoring this result - hair is striped.

If you get the result 'zits that form a pattern', roll another dice:
1 - The Word Redrum
2 - A player character's name
3 - A constellation
4 - The answer to a later puzzle
5 - A smiley face
6 - Roll twice more, ignoring this result - one on each cheek.
 
Roll 4 dice, use the total.
4Scar over left eye.
5Facial birthmark identical to one of the players favorite weapons.
6Unnatural hair color (includes any facial and body hair, and see note above).
7A broken arrow tip still lodged into the neck..
8An eye replaced by a gold coin.
9The word 'Liar' carved into his forehead.
10Teeth replaced with small dragon scales.
11Armor painted with bright red paint.
12Surgically implanted whiskers.
13A tattoo on his bare chest that reads 'I'm with stupid' and the arrow pointing up.
14A leash around his neck and another henchman holding the other end.
15A massive goiter.
16One knee that bends backwards causing him to walk with an crooked gait.
17Perfectly white teeth, so perfect they shine.
18A nose that has clearly been running for quite some time, covering the face in snot.
19A very fine hat, but otherwise a disheveled and filthy appearance.
20A wooden leg that appears to be made from a still living treant.
21Zits that form a pattern (see note above).
22A cape accidentally tucked into the back of his underwear.
23A noose worn around the neck, an hourglass dangling from its tie.
24Roll twice on this chart, ignoring this result.
 
 
Dungeon Construction
source or inspiration: Aaron Thorne
 
You can roll for individual rooms or corridors, or once for an entire area (eg once for the whole dungeon, or once for each level).
Low results mean that moving quickly and silently will be more difficult, but hiding will be easier. High results mean the opposite.
The result also effects how how many characters can walk side-by-side: Roll 1 dice, subtract 2 if the passage is Rough-Hewn or 1 if it's Normal (but results lower than 1 count as 1). The result is the number of human-sized characters who can walk side-by-side.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Rough-Hewn.
2Rough-Hewn.
3Normal.
4Normal.
5Well-Made.
6Finely-Made.
 
 
Ghostly Whispering
source or inspiration: Tabletop Adventures' 'Bits of Darkness'.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Beware!
13-4Cast off your flesh and join us.
15-6Danger!
21-2Death awaits!
23-4Halt - go back.
25-6It lives! It cannot be killed.
31-2Many enter, but no one leaves.
33-4We were once like yourselves, ere we wandered too deep into these halls (or ..into these hills, into these woods etc as appropriate).
35-6What are you doing?
41-2You cannot help me.
43-4It is too late.
45-6You shouldn't have come.
51-2Why come to die?
53-4Beware the deeps!
55-6Beware the fangs in the darkness!
61-2It is time to feed.
63-4Bring us your life.
65-6(the heroes hear nothing, but feel a sense that something here resents their presence).
 
 
Dungeon Lighting
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
You can roll for individual rooms or corridors, or once for an entire area (eg once for the whole dungeon, or once for each level).
Any monsters in the dungeon will almost always be able to see best in the dungeons light level which means that for example they may be blind in torch-light.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Completely dark. Characters will need to provide their own light source, or have the ability to see in complete darkness.
2Completely dark as above.
3Dark. Characters can see large objects and obvious movement, but there isnt enough light to read, unless the characters have the ability to see in low light, or provide their own light source.
4Dark as above.
5Dark as above.
6Light. The dungeon has enough light to read by.
 
 
Outsiders In a Group 1: Why Are They There?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table is intended for such things as a human living in a tribe of orcs (or vice versa).
 
Roll 1 dice.
1A scholar studying them.
2A priest, trying to convert them (optionally, roll on the Missionary Attitude table below).
3Exiled from their own society (optionally, roll again: 1-3 justly, 4-6 unjustly).
4Was found or taken by the group as a baby (optionally roll again: 1-3 found, 4-6 taken).
5A trader.
6Fell in love with one of the group.
 
 
Outsiders In a Group 2: Social Status
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table only refers to the subject's status in the group;
their status in the society they came from may be very different.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Lower status than most members of the group.
2Lower status than most members of the group.
3Accepted in the group.
4Accepted in the group.
5Accepted in the group.
6Higher status than most members of the group.
 
 
Missionary Attitude
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table gives a missionary's attitude to the people (or otherwise) they're trying to convert.
It assumes the missionary comes from a different culture.
It also gives the opportunity to make jokes about 'the missionary's position.'
 
Roll 1 dice.
1The missionary believes their hosts' religion is outright evil.
2The missionary has become unsure of what they believe. Roll again, ignoring this result, for the belief they most tend to.
3The missionary believes their hosts are good, but their religion is mistaken.
4The missionary believes their hosts' religion is an unclear, distorted, or primitive version of the priest's own.
5The missionary has started to take on some of the ideas of their hosts.
6The missionary has come to believe that the group's religion is a superior version of the priest's own.
 
 
Prisoners of Evil
source or inspiration: AEG's 'Toolbox'.
 
This table is intended for prisoners discovered in an area dominated by a mostly evil society
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3One who was taken for ransom. Roll again: 1-2 a merchant, 3-4 a noble, 5-6 a priest or shaman.
14-6One who came here to study their craft but fell afoul of the inhabitants. Roll again: 1-3 an assassin, 4-6 a necromancer.
21-3A sick and weakened warrior, the only survivor of an assault on the place.
24-6A thief who sought to make their reputation by stealing from this well-known den of evil.
31-3A berserker, of the same people as the owners of the prison. They are kept captive and only let out for battle, and begs the players to help them escape.
34-6A farmer, captured in a raid and worked half to death as a slave.
41-3One in their dotage, who has been kept captive so long they can't remember who they were or how they were captured.
44-6An illusionist, who has stayed alive by using their art to entertain their captors (optionally roll again: 1-3 they use genuine magic 4-6 they use tricks, like 'magicians' in the real world).
51-3A priest of a benign deity. Their captors have already ritually prepared them for sacrifice.
54-6A good member of the evil community, who naturally rebelled against their rulers.
61-3Roll again, ignoring this result or the one below, but the prisoner is dead. Then roll again: 1 they have written their story on some paper which is on their corpse, 2 As 1 but the paper is hidden in the cell, 3-6 no such paper can be found.
64-6Roll again, ignoring this result or the one above. The prisoner pretends to be whatever result is rolled. Then roll again: 1-3 they're actually working for the rulers of the place 4-6 they really are a prisoner, but lie about how they got here.
 
 
Character Flaws
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table can be used in a variety of ways:
  • Get one result, and use it as a character's greatest flaw.
  • Get two results - the first is the character's greatest flaw, the second is the flaw they are least prone to.
  • As a plot device: Use the result to answer how a hero turned to evil, how an empire fell etc.
  • For angel- or demon-like creatures, the result may represent the flaw they most promote or fight.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Arrogance.
14-6Blindness in Love.
21-3Lying.
24-6Listening to Flattery.
31-3Sowing Discord.
34-6False and Careless Optimism.
41-3Greed.
44-6Failing to Consider Future Generations.
51-3Anger.
54-6Treating Appearance as Reality.
61-3Despair.
64-6Adjusting Opinions to Self-Interest.
 
 
Creatures 1: Creature Size
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Tiny - the size of a human's fist or smaller.
2Very Small - eg a cat or dog.
3Small - eg a (human) child.
4Medium - roughly the size of a human adult.
5Medium as above.
6Large - at least twice the size of the average human adult.
 
 
Creatures 2: Average Group Size
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Creature SizeGroup Size
TinyTotal of 4 dice
Very SmallTotal of 3 dice
SmallTotal of 2 dice
Mediumroll 1 dice
Largeroll 1 dice: 1-2 one, 3-4 two, 5-6 three
 
 
Creatures 3: Habitat
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
If you're rolling up a monster for a specific environment, feel free to pick a result rather than rolling.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3The creature lives in the forest.
14-6The creature lives in the jungle.
21-3The creature lives on the plains.
24-6The creature lives in the desert.
31-3The creature lives in arctic regions.
34-6The creature lives in swamps and marshes.
41-3The creature lives in underground caverns.
44-6The creature travels through the ground (in the same sense that a fish moves through water or a bird through the air).
51-3The sea: the creature moves through the water like a fish.
54-6The sea: the creature moves along the sea floor as if it were land.
61-3The sea: the creature travels on the surface of the sea as if it were land.
64-6The creature lives in the astral plane.
 
 
Creatures 4: Appearance
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table is intended to be used with tables 5a, 5b and 5c.
Roll on the relevant table to fill in each A, B, and C.

This table also gives the basic type (or possible types) of the creature, out of five possibilities:
Animate: A non-biological imitation of a creature, which is created by mechanical cunning and/or magic rather than by reproduction. Some intelligent Animates will be able to create Animates (either of their own 'species', or another).
Monster: An unintelligent creature. The first members of any Monster species were created by magic ('magic' might include the vanished technology of the Ancients), but they now reproduce naturally.
Beast: An unintelligent creature which was not created by magical means (many Beasts will be species that exist in the real world).
Folk: An intelligent, non-human species, which reproduces naturally. The first members of any Folk might have been created by magical means, or may have evolved naturally. Examples of Folk are elves, orcs and centaurs.
Spirit: A supernatural creature which is the result of the death of a Beast, human, or member of a Folk. Examples of Spirits are ghosts, zombies, and vampires.
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresultroll again for
creature type
11-21-2Has the body of A, but a head like Broll on table 4a below.
11-23-4Has the body of A, but a head like Broll on table 4a below.
11-25-6Has the body of A, but a head which looks like C1-2 Monster 3-4 Folk 5-6 Spirit.
13-41-2Has a body which looks like B, but with the face of Aroll on table 4a below.
13-43-4Has a body which looks like B, but with the face of A1-2 Monster 3-4 Folk 5-6 Spirit.
13-45-6Has a body which looks like C, but with the face of A1-2 Monster 3-4 Folk 5-6 Spirit.
15-61-2Looks like a wooden carving of A1-3 Animate 4-6 Spirit.
15-63-4Looks like a wooden carving of B1-3 Animate 4-6 Spirit.
15-65-6Looks like a wooden carving of C1-3 Animate 4-6 Spirit.
21-21-2Looks like a wooden puppet of A1-3 Animate 4-6 Spirit.
21-23-4Looks like a wooden puppet of B1-3 Animate 4-6 Spirit.
21-25-6Looks like a child's doll of A1 Animate 2 Monster 3-4 Folk 5-6 Spirit.
23-41-2Looks like a child's doll of B1 Animate 2 Monster 3-4 Folk 5-6 Spirit.
23-43-4Looks like B, but is humanoid, walking upright with human-like hands and feet. It has exactly two arms and two legs, even if the animal it resembles doesn't. If the animal it resembles has wings, it will have wings as well as arms. Its skin will resemble that of the animal it resembles, and it will be covered in fur if the animal it resembles is.roll on table 4a below.
23-45-6Looks like B, but is humanoid, walking upright with human-like hands and feet. It has exactly two arms and two legs, even if the animal it resembles doesn't. If the animal it resembles has wings, it will have wings as well as arms. Its skin will resemble that of the animal it resembles, and it will be covered in fur if the animal it resembles is.roll on table 4a below.
25-61-2Looks like A, but insubstantial and ghostlySpirit.
25-63-4Looks like A, but insubstantial and ghostlySpirit.
25-65-6Looks like B, but insubstantial and ghostlySpirit.
31-21-2Looks like C, but insubstantial and ghostlySpirit.
31-23-4Looks like the animated corpse of ASpirit.
31-25-6Looks like the animated corpse of ASpirit.
33-41-2Looks like the animated corpse of BSpirit.
33-43-4Looks like the animated corpse of BSpirit.
33-45-6Looks like A, but fiery and demonicSpirit.
35-61-2Looks like A, but fiery and demonicSpirit.
35-63-4Looks like B, but fiery and demonicSpirit.
35-65-6Looks like B, but fiery and demonicSpirit.
41-21-2Takes the form of A, but may revert to its true form, which looks like B1-2 Monster 3-4 Folk 5-6 Spirit.
41-23-4Takes the form of A, but may revert to its true form, which looks like B1-2 Monster 3-4 Folk 5-6 Spirit.
41-25-6Takes the form of A, but may revert to its true form, which looks like C1-2 Monster 3-4 Folk 5-6 Spirit.
43-41-2Looks like the offspring of B and B [re-roll any duplicated results]1-2 Monster 3-4 Folk 5-6 Spirit.
43-43-4Looks like the offspring of B and B [re-roll any duplicated results]1-2 Monster 3-4 Folk 5-6 Spirit.
43-45-6Looks like the offspring of B, B and B [re-roll any duplicated results]1-2 Monster 3-4 Folk 5-6 Spirit.
45-61-2Looks like C which has grown into the shape of A1-2 Monster 3-4 Folk 5-6 Beast.
45-63-4Looks like C which has grown into the shape of B1-2 Monster 3-4 Folk 5-6 Beast.
45-65-6Looks like a statue of A1-3 Animate 4-6 Spirit.
51-21-2Looks like a statue of B1-3 Animate 4-6 Spirit.
51-23-4Looks like a statue of C1-3 Animate 4-6 Spirit.
51-25-6Looks like a hedge, cut into the shape of B1-2 Monster 3-4 Folk 5-6 Beast.
53-41-2Looks like A above the waist, B belowroll on table 4a below.
53-43-4Looks like A above the waist, B belowroll on table 4a below.
53-45-6Looks like A above the waist, C below1-2 Monster 3-4 Folk 5 Beast 6 Spirit.
55-61-2Looks like the offspring of a human and Broll on table 4a below.
55-63-4Looks like the offspring of a human and Broll on table 4a below.
55-65-6Looks like the disembodied head of A1 Folk 2-3 Monster 4-6 Spirit.
61-21-2Looks like the disembodied head of B1 Folk 2-3 Monster 4-6 Spirit.
61-23-4Is a robot, built to resemble AAnimate.
61-25-6Is a robot, built to resemble BAnimate.
63-41-2Is a robot, built to resemble CAnimate.
63-43-4Looks like A on one side of its body, A on the other [re-roll any duplicated results]1-2 Monster 3-4 Folk 5-6 Spirit.
63-45-6Looks like A on one side of its body, B on the otherroll on table 4a below.
65-61-2Looks like A, wearing a mask of Broll on table 4a below.
65-63-4Looks like B, wearing a mask of Aroll on table 4a below.
65-65-6Looks like B, wearing a mask of B [re-roll any duplicated results]1-2 Monster 3-4 Folk 5-6 Spirit.
 
 
Creatures 4a: Origins of a Half-Animal, Half-Human Species
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table is intended to be used for some results on the table above.
 
Roll 1 dice.
rollresultroll again for
creature type
1Humans cursed by (roll again: 1-3 a god 4-6 an evil sorcerer).1-4 Monster 5-6 Folk.
2Humans whose evil forces them to return in this form after death.Spirit.
3Mating between humans and animals.1-3 Beast 4-6 Folk.
4An experiment (roll again: 1-3 using magic 4-6 using lost ancient technology).1-3 Monster 4-6 Folk.
5Natural evolution - from humans.1-4 Beast 5-6 Folk.
6Natural evolution - from animals.1-4 Beast 5-6 Folk.
 
 
Creatures 5a: Humans
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table is designed to be used with Creatures table 4 above.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3A child.
14-6A beautiful young woman.
21-3A strong, handsome youth.
24-6Either a beautiful young woman or a strong, handsome youth.
31-3A wrinked crone.
34-6A wizened old man.
41-3Either a wrinked crone or a wizened old man.
44-6Whoever is standing closest to it at the time.
51-3Whoever the person standing closest to it will respond best to - their first love, parents, a favourite teacher etc.
54-6A human, so deformed that its gender can't be determined.
61-3A person that could be either a boy or a young woman.
64-6A person that could either be a feminine-looking young man, or a masculine-looking woman.
 
 
Creatures 5b: Animals
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table is designed to be used with Creatures table 4 above.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11An ameoba.
12An ant.
13An ape.
14An armadillo.
15A bat.
16A bee.
21A bird of paradise.
22A blowfly.
23A butterfly.
24A cat.
25A chicken.
26A crocodile.
31A crow.
32A dog.
33An elephant.
34A frog.
35A goldfish.
36roll again: 1-2 a horse 3-4 a camel 5-6 a zebra.
41An iguana.
42A jackal.
43A kangaroo.
44A mouse.
45An owl.
46A parrot.
51A rhinoceros.
52A scarab/dung beetle.
53A seagull.
54A snail.
55A snake.
56A spider.
61roll again: 1-2 a tiger 3-4 a lion 5-6 a jaguar.
62A turtle.
63A vulture.
64A walrus.
65A warthog.
66A wolf.
 
 
Creatures 5c: Plants (and a few odds and ends)
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table is designed to be used with Creatures table 4 above.
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
1-21-21-2A rose.
1-21-23-4A Venus Flytrap.
1-21-25-6Ivy.
1-23-41-2A water lily.
1-23-43-4A leaf, not attached to any plant.
1-23-45-6Roll again: 1-3 a sunflower 4-6 a dandelion.
1-25-61-2An opium poppy.
1-25-63-4A mushroom.
1-25-65-6A plume of smoke.
3-41-21-2A weeping willow.
3-41-23-4A cherry blossom tree.
3-41-25-6A bunch of varied flowers.
3-43-41-2A laurel wreath.
3-43-43-4A tree, covered in green leaves.
3-43-45-6A tree, covered in autumn leaves.
3-45-61-2A tree, bare of leaves.
3-45-63-4A palm tree.
3-45-65-6A hedge maze.
5-61-21-2Seaweed.
5-61-23-4Clover. 1 in 36 of the creatures will have four leaves instead of three. That is, for each individual creature roll 2 dice, and if they're both 6s the creature is four-leafed. The four-leafed creatures may be more powerful and/or lucky than the normal members of their species.
5-61-25-6Mould.
5-63-41-2A pile of leaves.
5-63-43-4A dice.
5-63-45-6A haystack.
5-65-61-2A tumbleweed.
5-65-63-4A wooden hut.
5-65-65-6A piece of driftwood.
 
 
Creatures 6: Collective Noun
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table gives the name for a group of particular creatures
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11flock (only for flying creatures - roll again if necessary).
12flight (only for flying creatures - roll again if necessary).
13band.
14herd.
15host.
16phalanx.
21company.
22colony.
23congress.
24congregation.
25nest.
26covey.
31wake.
32clutch.
33brood.
34horde.
35mob.
36murder.
41parliament.
42unkindness.
43school (only for sea creatures - roll again if necessary).
44shoal (only for sea creatures - roll again if necessary).
45cloud.
46cluster.
51knot.
52bask.
53den.
54bevy.
55gang.
56pit.
61gaggle.
62hive.
63pack.
64troop.
65swarm (only for creatures who are the size of a human fist or smaller - roll again if necessary).
66pride.
 
 
Creatures 7a: Animates' Special Abilities
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Natural Armour and Immunity to Poison.
12as above.
13Natural Armour, Immunity to Poison, and roll once on 'on 'Creatures 8: Special Abilities' below.
14as above, but roll twice.
15as above, but roll three times.
16Natural Armour and Greater True Sight.
21as above.
22Natural Armour, Greater True Sight, and roll once on 'Creatures 8: Special Abilities' below.
23as above, but roll twice.
24as above, but roll three times.
25Natural Armour and Lesser True Sight.
26as above.
31Natural Armour, Lesser True Sight, and roll once on 'Creatures 8: Special Abilities' below.
32as above, but roll twice.
33as above, but roll three times.
34Greater True Sight and Immunity to Poison.
35as above.
36Greater True Sight, Immunity to Poison, and roll once on 'Creatures 8: Special Abilities' below.
41as above, but roll twice.
42as above, but roll three times.
43Lesser True Sight and Immunity to Poison.
44as above.
45Lesser True Sight, Immunity to Poison, and roll once on 'Creatures 8: Special Abilities' below.
46as above, but roll twice.
51as above, but roll three times.
52Greater True Sight, Natural Armour, and Immunity to Poison.
53as above.
54as above.
55as above.
56Greater True Sight, Natural Armour, Immunity to Poison, and roll once on 'Creatures 8: Special Abilities' below.
61as above, but roll twice.
62Lesser True Sight, Natural Armour, and Immunity to Poison.
63as above.
64as above.
65Lesser True Sight, Natural Armour, Immunity to Poison, and roll once on 'Creatures 8: Special Abilities' below.
66as above, but roll twice.
 
 
Creatures 7b: Monsters' and Folk's Special Abilities
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1no special ability.
2no special ability.
3roll once on 'Creatures 8: Special Abilities' below.
4as above, but roll twice.
5as above, but roll three times.
6as above, but roll four times.
 
 
Creatures 7c: Beasts' Special Abilities
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3no special ability.
14-6no special ability.
21-3no special ability.
24-6no special ability.
31-3Lesser True Sight.
34-6roll once on 'Creatures 8: Special Abilities' below.
41-3as above, but roll twice.
44-6as above, but roll three times.
51-3as above, but roll four times.
54-6Lesser True Sight, and roll once on 'Creatures 8: Special Abilities' below.
61-3as above, but roll twice.
64-6as above, but roll three times.
 
 
Creatures 7d: Spirits' Special Abilities
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
rollresult
1-3The Spirit has Greater True Sight. In addition, roll again, subtract 1, and if the result is more than 0 roll that many times on 'Creatures 8: Special Abilities' below.
4-5as above, but the Spirit has Lesser True Sight rather than Greater True Sight.
6Roll again and roll that many times on 'Creatures 8: Special Abilities' below.
 
 
Creatures 7e: Spirits - Intangible?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1-2The Spirit is incorporeal: it can't be harmed except by magical means, nor can it directly physically harm anyone (eg a ghost).
3-4The Spirit is immune to non-magical harm (for example from normal weapons), but can fight other people normally (eg a vampire).
5-6The Spirit fights like a normal creature (eg a zombie).
 
 
Creatures 8: Special Abilities
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
This table is intended to be used after rolling on the relevant one of tables 5a-5e above.

There's no ability along the lines of 'Low-Light Vision'.
Creatures encountered in dark places (eg some dungeons, or at night), can be assumed to have the ability to see in low light.

There's also no 'Flight' ability, as this is covered in Creatures table 3 above.

If you get the same result twice, an ability that the creature can't have (for example a Beast or Animate that rolls Steal Life), or two versions of the same ability (eg Greater and Lesser True Sight), ignore the roll but count it towards the number of abilities rolled (if you're told to roll twice for example, the useless roll counts as one of the two rolls).
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Amphibious: The creature can breathe both water and air. Flying creatures may not have this ability. Animates don't need to breathe, but if you roll this ability it means that water doesn't destroy their mechanisms.
12Breath Weapon: The creature breathes fire, like a dragon. Beasts may not have this ability. If The creature also has 'Extra Head' below, roll 1 dice: 1-3 only one head has a breath weapon, 4-6 both do.
13Gas: The creature breathes a cloud of gas. Roll on the Gas Cloud table in the 'Dungeons' section for what it does. The creature is immune to its own cloud of gas.
14Camouflage: The creature can change their flesh to the colour of their surroundings, making them harder to spot.
15Stealthy: The creature is extra-good at moving silently and staying hidden.
16Agile: The creature is extra-good at avoiding being hit (for a creature of its size: in many games, the smaller a creature is the harder it will be to hit. The 'agile' ability is on top of that effect).
21Charge or Dive: The creature charges at its enemies (or dives, in the case of flying creatures). They are one 'step' more frightening than normal when doing this (for example Laughable creatures become Underwhelming, Unnerving creatures become Frightening. Terrifying creatures don't change). For land creatures, using this ability requires reasonably flat terrain. Water creatures may not have this ability.
22Crush: If the creature manages to get hold of an enemy which is roughly its size or smaller, it will eventually crush it to death. This means that the victim will take damage automatically, and can't attack, until and unless they manage to break free. Creatures smaller than Medium roll again: they still have this ability, but it's unlikely to effect most player-characters.
23Swallow whole: This works in a similar way to Crush (above). However the creature can only swallow beings which are half its size or smaller. The victim can't attempt to break free - they can only be saved if the creature dies. The creature will dissolve armour first, and only then start to damage the character. Creatures smaller than twice the size of a human ('Large' on Creatures table 1) roll again: they still have this ability, but it's unlikely to effect most player-characters. Only Monsters and Folk can have this ability.
24as above, but the creature's stomach doesn't dissolve metal. It will never swallow characters with metal armour (or Animates made of metal). Only Monsters and Folk can have this ability.
25Rust:The creatures' touch corrodes metal. This may effect armour, weapons, Animates etc. Beasts may not have this ability. Animates can only have this ability if they're not made of metal (see Creatures table 7). If the creature also has Crush or Swallow Whole, successfully doing so will corrode metal very quickly. The creature is unable to use any metal items.
26Parasitoid: The creature lays its eggs in other species. Animates and Spirits may not have this ability.
31Spread Disease: The creature's touch can cause disease (if you're using the 'Disease' table in the 'Wilderness' section, treat the creature's touch as adding a set number of Exposure Points).
32Drain Magic: The creature's touch drains magical ability.
33Mimic: The creature can temporarily gain the abilities of any creature near to it. This ability won't work on Animates or Spirits. Beasts may not have this ability.
34Suppress Magic: Being near to the creature makes it very difficult to use magic. This doesn't have any permanent effect on characters' magical abilities. Spirits who are immune to non-magical harm can't have this ability.
35Magnetic: The creature is magnetic. Metal items (including armour) will be dragged towards it. In the case of weapons, this may cause the creature significant harm.
36Entangling Web: The creature spins webs which are likely to restrict the movement of creatures of its size or smaller. Creatures smaller than Medium may have this ability, but it's unlikely to effect most player's characters.
41Great Speed: The creature is far faster than normal creatures of its size.
42Natural Armour: The creature's hide is so tough that it's treated as armour. This doesn't stop the creature having actual armour as well, if appropriate.
43Steal Life: If The creature successfully causes damage, it heals as well. Beasts and Animates may not have this ability.
44Lesser True Sight: The creature is less effected by magical attacks based on illusions or fear than a normal creature would be.
45Greater True Sight: The creature is totally immune to magical attacks based on illusions or fear.
46Extra Head: If the creature is a Monster, Spirit, or Animate, it may attack with each head. If one head is severed, it remains alive as long as it has a head left. Beasts may not have this ability.
51Magic: The creature has the ability to use a spell or spells from the same list that is available to player-characters. Beasts may not have this ability.
52Cling to Walls: The creature has the ability to climb or stick to any surface without the risk of falling.
53Resistant to Poison: The creature is less effected by poison than a normal creature of its type would be.
54Immunity to Poison: The creature is totally immune to poison. Beasts may not have this ability.
55Poison: The creature's attack involves poison. Usually this means that it a wound will continue to do damage until the poison is removed or a natural or magical antidote can be applied.
56Paralysis: A particular kind of poison: rather than continue to do damage, the creature's attack may cause paralysis, until the poison is removed or a natural or magical antidote can be applied.
61Resistant to Magic: The creature is less effected by magic than a normal creature would be. Spirits who are are immune to non-magical harm may not have this ability.
62Immunity to Magic: The creature is immune to magic. Spirits who are immune to non-magical harm may not have this ability.
63Regeneration: The creature heals unnaturally quickly. Beasts may not have this ability.
64Viral Breeding: If the creature causes a wound to a Beast, human, or member of a Folk, the victim may eventually turn into a Spirit similar to the creature itself (like the bite of a vampire). Only Spirits may have this ability.
65Vital Ingredient: Actually a disadvantage: a part of the creature has a magical use. Roll on the Blessings table in the 'Treasure' section to see what the effect is. The creature doesn't gain the ability to use that magical effect. Usually the body part must be prepared in a particular way for the effect to work. Animates and Beasts may not have this 'ability', nor may incorporeal Spirits.
66Stamina: The creature tires far less quickly than a normal creature would..
 
 
Creatures 9a: Animates - Made of What?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Roll on the 'Precious Stones' table in the 'Treasure' section.
14-6Steel.
21-3Iron.
24-6roll again: 1-2 Brass 3-4 Copper 5-6 Bronze.
31-3Gold.
34-6Silver.
41-3Wood.
44-6Glass (clear).
51-3Glass (stained).
54-6Jade.
61-3The Animate is covered in human flesh (or that of some other intelligent species of your game world). Roll again for its internal workings, ignoring this result. Also, optionally roll again: 1-3 the Animate can pass as a living being 4-6 the Animate is obviously artificial.
64-6roll twice more on this table, ignoring this result. If you get the same result twice, re-roll one of them. If one of the results is to roll on the 'Precious Stones' table, the creature is made of the other material, but their 'skin' is studded with the precious stones..
 
 
Creatures 9b: Animates - Powered by What?
source or inspiration: Sean Wills
 
If the Animate needs fuel or re-winding, roll again for how often: 1-2 daily 3-4 weekly 5-6 monthly.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Steam (the Animate must periodically ingest coal).
2Clockwork (Roll again: 1-3 the Animate must periodically find another to wind it. 4-6 the Animate's makers discovered the secret of perpetual motion, and the Animate can wind itself, or two of this kind of Animate can wind each other).
3Radium (the Animate can operate for years without needing fuel).
4A smaller Animate lives in the robot's (roll again: 1-3 head 4-6 chest) and controls it (roll again on this table for what is powering that Animate).
5Magic (the Animate doesn't need fuel, but effects which dispel magic can kill the Animate or render it unconscious).
6Solar (the Animate must spend an hour in the sun gathering power for every (roll again: 1-3 day 4-6 week) of operation. Roll again: 1-2 the Animate can work normally during this time 3-4 it must remain motionless, but can still sense and communicate 5-6 it will be motionless and unconscious..
 
 
Creatures 10: How Frightening
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll three dice, discard the highest, and take the total of the remaining two.

Apply the following modifiers (results less than 2 count as 2, and over 12 count as 12):
Tiny -3
Very Small -2
Small -1
Large +3
Beast -2
Animate +2
Spirit +3
Creature has no special abilities -2
For each 2 special abilities +1
Particular types of character may be familiar with, and so less frightened of, particular types of creatures
eg hunters against Beasts, warriors against Monsters, wizards against Spirits.

If the player characters are outnumbered at least two to one, by creatures who are at least roughly the same size as them (in most cases, Medium or Large), then the creatures become one 'step' more frightening. For example Laughable creatures become Underwhelming, Unnerving creatures become Frightening. Terrifying creatures don't change.
 
2Laughable: Those who fight this creature are likely to underestimate it, at least until they're wounded by it.
3Laughable as above.
4Laughable as above.
5Underwhelming: Those who fight this creature are unlikely to feel themselves in any danger.
6Underwhelming as above.
7Unnerving: Those who fight this creature are likely to perform less well, physically and mentally, than they would in moments of tranquility.
8Unnerving as above.
9Frightening: Those who fight this creature are likely to be significantly impaired by fear, and may even find themselves panicking and fleeing.
10Frightening as above.
11Frightening as above.
12Terrifying: Merely being able to act when this creature is threatening is a sign of some courage. Its enemies will frequently panic and run, 'freeze up', faint, or may even die of terror.
 
 
Creatures 11a: Species Nicknames, part a
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table is supposed to be used with table 12b below.

Normally, the results should be combined 'A B', where A is the result on this table, and B is the result on table 12b. For example, 'Sorrowful Gentleman'.

However, if the entry here is marked with a (+), the result is 'BA'. For example, 'King-on-the-Hill'.

If the result here is 'Barrow-', don't put a space. For example, 'Barrow-Worm'.

If the result is 'Imperial Emperor' or 'Conquering Conquerer', roll again on both tables.
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
11-21-2Ancient.
11-23-4Barrow-.
11-25-6Beautiful.
13-41-2Black.
13-43-4Bronze.
13-45-6Burrowing.
15-61-2Cave.
15-63-4Compassionate.
15-65-6Conquering.
21-21-2Dark.
21-23-4Fat.
21-25-6Floating.
23-41-2Foul.
23-43-4Gibbering.
23-45-6Golden.
25-61-2Greedy.
25-63-4Green.
25-65-6Harmonious.
31-21-2Harsh.
31-23-4Hopeful.
31-25-6Hungry.
33-41-2Imperial.
33-43-4-in-the-Dark (+).
33-45-6-in-the-Green (+).
35-61-2-in-Yellow (+).
35-63-4Light.
35-65-6Lost.
41-21-2Love's.
41-23-4Mad.
41-25-6Merciful.
43-41-2Nameless.
43-43-4-on-the-Hill (+).
43-45-6-o'-the-Isles (+).
45-61-2Peaceful.
45-63-4Pitiful.
45-65-6Proud.
51-21-2Purple.
51-23-4's Mercy (+).
51-25-6's Ruin (+).
53-41-2Screaming.
53-43-4Shambling.
53-45-6Shining.
55-61-2Silent.
55-63-4Silk.
55-65-6Slithering.
61-21-2Thin.
61-23-4Twisted.
61-25-6Velvet.
63-41-2Watchful.
63-43-4Whispering.
63-45-6White.
65-61-2-Who-Waits (+).
65-63-4-Who-Watches (+).
65-65-6-With-Two-Voices (+).
 
 
Creatures 11b: Species Nicknames, part b
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Bird.
12Champion.
13Companion.
14Conqueror.
15Dandy.
16Dandy.
21Drinker.
22Duchess.
23Duchess.
24Duke.
25Emperor.
26Eye.
31Finger.
32Folk.
33Forgiver.
34Gentleman.
35Gentleman.
36Guide.
41Hag.
42Hand.
43Heart.
44Hisser.
45Judge.
46King.
51Knight.
52Lady.
53Lady.
54Mother.
55Peacock.
56Protector.
61Servant.
62Sister.
63Sleeper.
64Sower.
65Warrior.
66Worm.
 
 
Creatures 12a: Species Names, part a
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Tables 13a, 13b and 13c are designed to be used together. Combine the results in that order to create a single word.
For example, rolling all 1s would give 'Abberaban'. All 6s would give 'Ursuovore'.

If the result on 13a is marked with a (+), roll on 13b. Otherwise, roll one dice, and only roll on 13b if you get a 1-3.

There's a small chance of getting a name with a double i, u, c or y.
In any of these cases, change it to a single letter.
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
111-3Abber.
114-6Abomin.
121-3Albin.
124-6Arach.
131-3Arg.
134-6Arimas.
141-3Ash.
144-6Atlan.
151-3Auton.
154-6Baph.
161-3Bar.
164-6Basil.
211-3Blu.
214-6Bru.
221-3Bucen.
224-6Cac (+).
231-3Capr (+).
234-6Car.
241-3Carn (+).
244-6Cary.
251-3Cato.
254-6Cer.
261-3Cha.
264-6Chi.
311-3Chiro.
314-6Col.
321-3Cyn.
324-6Degen.
331-3Der.
334-6Dich.
341-3Dodec.
344-6Dol.
351-3Dr (+).
354-6Drac.
361-3Fom.
364-6Gor.
411-3Gorg.
414-6Gr (+).
421-3Har.
424-6Hecat (+).
431-3Hecaton.
434-6Hell (+).
441-3Hipp.
444-6Hyper.
451-3Ich.
454-6Jugger.
461-3Mal.
464-6Manti.
511-3Megalo.
514-6Min.
521-3Mor.
524-6Mus.
531-3Myr.
534-6Nyct.
541-3Olym.
544-6Olymp.
551-3Per.
554-6Ple (+).
561-3Pyr (+).
564-6Quin.
611-3Rhab.
614-6Rhin.
621-3Sagit.
624-6Scor.
631-3Sti.
634-6Tant (+).
641-3Tetr (+).
644-6Trag.
651-3Tri.
654-6Trog.
661-3Un.
664-6Urs.
 
 
Creatures 12b: Species Names, part b
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
1-21-21-2a.
1-21-23-4e.
1-21-25-6i.
1-23-41-2o.
1-23-43-4u.
1-23-45-6y.
1-25-61-2ae.
1-25-63-4ai.
1-25-65-6ao.
3-41-21-2au.
3-41-23-4ea.
3-41-25-6ee.
3-43-41-2ei.
3-43-43-4eo.
3-43-45-6eau.
3-45-61-2ia.
3-45-63-4ie.
3-45-65-6io.
5-61-21-2oa.
5-61-23-4oe.
5-61-25-6oi.
5-63-41-2oo.
5-63-43-4ou.
5-63-45-6ua.
5-65-61-2ue.
5-65-63-4ui.
5-65-65-6uo.
 
 
Creatures 12c: Species Names, part c
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
111-2ban.
113-4banian.
115-6barian.
121-2basti.
123-4beria.
125-6beros.
131-2bian.
133-4blepas.
135-6borean.
141-2can.
143-4cephal.
145-6cephalon.
151-2cephalon.
153-4ceros.
155-6chios.
161-2clope.
163-4clops.
165-6core.
211-2corn.
213-4cornean.
215-6crit.
221-2crota.
223-4cus.
225-6dosian.
231-2dra.
233-4dyte.
235-6ean.
241-2gog.
243-4gon.
245-6gryph.
251-2lian.
253-4lid.
255-6liph.
261-2lith.
263-4lock.
265-6mander.
311-2mar.
313-4massu.
315-6median.
321-2mera.
323-4mia.
325-6mian.
331-2midon.
333-4midon.
335-6mur.
341-2mure.
343-4nasm.
345-6naut.
351-2neon.
353-4niad.
355-6nian.
361-2nid.
363-4nite.
365-6nix.
411-2path.
413-4pax.
415-6phalon.
421-2phant.
423-4pheros.
425-6phin.
431-2phon.
433-4pian.
435-6pion.
441-2poid.
443-4pusa.
445-6rate.
451-2raton.
453-4ratos.
455-6rax.
461-2rena.
463-4rete.
465-6roid.
511-2ron.
513-4rone.
515-6ronian.
521-2ront.
523-4ros.
525-6rost.
531-2saur.
533-4seid.
535-6sk.
541-2soid.
543-4ssus.
545-6st.
551-2stomos.
553-4tanian.
555-6tarian.
561-2taur.
563-4tauride.
565-6taurine.
611-2teon.
613-4tep.
615-6tesk.
621-2tetra.
623-4theon.
625-6thid.
631-2thoid.
633-4thol.
635-6tid.
641-2toid.
643-4tomian.
645-6ton.
651-2tor.
653-4tos.
655-6trice.
661-2tyr.
663-4vern.
665-6vore.
 
 
Combat Behaviour
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table is usable for intelligent and non-intelligent creatures.
If the creature is a solitary one, 'half its strength' means 'half its hit points', or the equivalent in your system.
For creatures that live in groups, 'half its strength' means 'at least half the creatures in the group who are able to fight are alive and unwounded'
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Will fight to the death. Will pursue anyone who attempts to retreat.
13-4Will fight to the death. Will pursue anyone who tries to retreat unless it's down to a quarter of its strength or less.
15-6Will fight to the death, but will not pursue enemies.
21-2Will fight until it's down to half strength or less, and will then try to run away. If there's no escape, will surrender. Will pursue enemies if it has at least half its strength.
23-4Will fight until it's down to half strength or less, and will then try to run away. If there's no escape, will surrender. Will not pursue enemies.
25-6Will fight until it's down to half strength or less, and will then try to run away. If there's no escape, will fight to the death. Will pursue enemies if it has at least half its strength.
31-2Will fight until it's down to half strength or less, and will then try to run away. If there's no escape, will fight to the death. Will not pursue enemies.
33-4Will fight until it's down to half strength or less, then will surrender. Will pursue enemies if it has at least three-quarters of its strength.
35-6Will fight until it's down to half strength or less, then will surrender. Will not pursue enemies.
41-2Will only fight until it's wounded, and will then try to run away. If there's no escape, will fight to the death. Will not pursue enemies.
43-4Will only fight until it's wounded, and will then try to run away. If there's no escape, will fight to the death. Will only pursue enemies if unwounded.
45-6as above.
51-2Will only fight until it's wounded, and will then try to run away. If there's no escape, will fight until it's down to half strength or less, and will then surrender. Will not pursue enemies.
53-4Will only fight until it's wounded, and will then try to run away. If there's no escape, will fight until it's down to half strength or less, and will then surrender. Will only pursue enemies if unwounded.
55-6Will always attempt to run away. If there's no escape, will surrender. Will not pursue enemies.
61-2Will always attempt to run away. If there's no escape, will fight to the death. Will not pursue enemies.
63-4Will always attempt to run away. If there's no escape, will fight until it's wounded, and will then surrender. Will not pursue enemies.
65-6Will always attempt to run away. If there's no escape, will fight until it's down to half strength or less, and will then surrender. Will not pursue enemies.
 
 
Attitudes to Strangers
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table is useful to decide how a group, whether human or not, will react to strangers (most obviously the player characters)
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3They will attack or harass anyone who enters their territory.
14-6They will allow travellers to pass through their territory by a particular route, but attack them if they leave the route. They may also attack travellers who stop for too long.
21-3They may hide from travellers, or attack them, depending on how strong the travellers seem.
24-6They will hide from travellers. If cornered they will fight or give in, depending on how strong the travellers seem. If the travellers take any of their goods they may pursue them.
31-3They will be friendly to strangers, but won't give any help unless it's paid for (payment isn't necessarily in the form of currency). If the travellers are obviously close to death they will help, but expect payment afterwards. If the travellers take something without paying there is likely to be violence - either immediately if they're powerful enough, or as soon as they can call the sheriff / get a mob together.
34-6As above, but if the travellers are close to death they will help without expecting payment.
41-3As above, As above, but if the travellers are close to death they will help without expecting payment, and they will give information for free, only expecting payment for more substantial forms of help.
44-6They will give food, water and shelter to any travellers without expecting payment, but out of duty rather than inclination. They won't offer any help unless asked, or unless the travellers are obviously in a bad way, and will grudgingly give the minimum their code allows.
51-3They will willingly give food, water and shelter and offer any information they can, without expecting payment.
54-6As above, but if able they will willingly give other help, for example offering fresh horses or volunteering to guide the strangers.
61-3Roll twice more, ignoring this result or the one below. The better result applies to their own kin, the worse result to anyone else. 'Kin' may mean members of their own species, or a sub-group of that species, or a group defined in another way such as followers of a particular religion.
64-6Their reaction may be any that appear on this table, depending on a complicated system of omens, their mood at the time, or other factors: roll for each individual group of travellers, or even each individual traveller. There should be no rhyme or reason to their actions - they may attack a large well-armed group but hide from an individual, then give their best horses to speed the journey of the next person who passes through.
 
 
Lookin' for Adventure, or Whatever Comes Our Way:
Adventure ideas from song lyrics
source or inspiration: Lyrics by various artists, collected by James Hutchings
 
The title of this table is from 'Born To Be Wild' by Steppenwolf.
The listed band or singer is whoever most famously sung it - they didn't necessarily write it.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresultorigin
11Renegade priests, and treacherous young witches. Bob Dylan Changing of the Guard.
12Merchants and thieves, hungry for power.Bob Dylan Changing of the Guard.
13The palace of mirrors, where dog-soldiers are reflected.Bob Dylan Changing of the Guard.
14The cities are on fire with the burning flesh of men. Bob Dylan Death is Not the End.
15The killing moon will come too soon. Echo and the Bunnymen The Killing Moon.
16The negroes in the forest, brightly feathered. The Doors The Wasp (Texas Radio and the Big Beat).
21She has robes and she has monkeys
Lazy diamond-studded flunkies.
The Doors Love Street.
22Lost in a Roman wilderness of pain. The Doors The End.
23Hellhound on my trail. Robert Johnson Hellhound On My Trail.
24You strike my side by accident
as you go down for your gold.
Leonard Cohen Avalanche.
25When I am not this hunchback that you see
I sleep beneath the golden hill.
Leonard Cohen Avalanche.
26All hands on deck at dawn
sailing to sadder shores.
Echo and the Bunnymen Ocean Rain.
31Home of pirates, drunks and whores. The Simpsons cast New Orleans.
32Southern trees bear strange fruit,
Blood on the leaves and blood at the root,
Black bodies swinging in the southern breeze,
Strange fruit hanging from the poplar trees.
Billie Holiday Strange Fruit.
33Felled his master not by chance
away with pomp and circumstance.
Chumbawamba Farewell to the Crown.
34She walks these hills in a long black veil. too many to list Long Black Veil.
35Little fish, big fish, swimmin in the water
come back here man gimme my daughter.
P.J. Harvey Down By the Water.
36Set the controls for the heart of the Sun. Pink Floyd Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun.
41Tell them a hookah smoking caterpillar
has given you the call.
Jefferson Airplane Go Ask Alice.
42I've stepped in the middle of seven sad forests
I've been out in front of a dozen dead oceans.
Bob Dylan Hard Rain.
43Tell those men with horses for hearts. The Church The Unguarded Moment.
44Creatures kissing in the rain
shapeless in the dark again.
The Cure The Hanging Garden.
45In a hanging garden
change the past
in a hanging garden
wearing furs and masks.
The Cure The Hanging Garden.
46In the heat of the night
the animals scream.
The Cure The Hanging Garden.
51Fall out of the sky
cover my face as the animals die.
The Cure The Hanging Garden.
52I passed the howling woman. The Cure The Walk.
53I hear your name, and I'm aflame. Ella Fitzgerald That Old Black Magic.
54Deep in the woods a funeral is swinging. The Birthday Party Deep in the Woods.
55THIS IS DWARF INVASION!Reggie and the Full Effect, Dwarf Invasion.
56Temple of low men.Crowded House, album title.
61Under a blood-red sky
a crowd has gathered, black and white.
U2, New Years Day.
62It's the end of the world as we know it and I feel fine.REM, It's the End of the World As We Know It.
63Sleep comes like a drug in God's country
Sad eyes, crooked crosses in God's country.
U2, In God's Country.
64roll again:
1-3 Set me alight
We'll punch a hole right through the night
Everyday the dreamers die
See what's on the other side.

4-6 Dreamed I saw a desert rose
Dress torn in ribbons and in bows
Like a siren she calls to me.
U2, In God's Country.
65All the vampires walking through the valleyTom Petty and the Heartbreakers, Free Fallin'.
66roll again:
1-3 The world is a vampire, sent to drain.

4-6 Despite all my rage I am still just a rat in a cage.
Smashing Pumpkins, Bullet With Butterfly Wings.
 
 
Adventure Ideas from Puns
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
11-31-3Elementals, my dear Watson.
11-34-6Djinn and tonic (from the giantitp.com forums).
14-61-3He has the body of a 20 year old. But he needs several more...
14-64-6Lizard-Man comedian Eddie Lizzard.
21-31-3Gnome political commentators Gnome Chomsky and Gnome E. Klein.
21-34-6Figs of your imagination.
24-61-3We're going to Serf City.
24-64-6Two killer mockingbirds.
31-31-3roll again: 1-3 An elf, fulfilling prophecy 4-6 Elf-raising flour.
31-34-6Phil Spectre.
34-61-3Wight supremacists.
34-64-6Noah's orc.
41-31-3The Kobold and the Beautiful.
41-34-6Rasta-fairy-uns (frequently out of their tree).
44-61-3Hump-free Boggart (thanks to Thorkhammer).
44-64-6A kingdom is tormented by a monster that carries off maidens, and tells them long, boring stories. Who will slay the Drag-on?.
51-31-3A mysterious disease that only strikes down bards: minstrel cramps.
51-34-6roll again: 1-3 A crippling drug hobbit (thanks to Nazim) 4-6 Lorena Hobbit.
54-61-3A comedy about annoyingly smug, 30-something demons: Fiends.
54-64-6roll again: 1-3 the Forest Gump 4-6 the River Phoenix.
61-31-3The Downunderworld: an underground kingdom where lurk kangarorcs, wombalrogs, kookabarrow wights, entalyptuses, flaming galahs, and frill-necked wizards.
61-34-6The king has gone mad with grief - he's stopped living in a fantasy world.
64-61-3An army of insane, sentient furniture - the random tables.
64-64-6Emonic posession, alternative rocs, and shog-goths.
 
 
Traps in Rooms and Corridors
source or inspiration: Aaron Thorne
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2One or two people fall 1 level, taking damage as appropriate, due to a (roll again: 1-2 floor which can't support one person's weight 3-4 hidden trapdoor 5-6 magically disappearing section of floor).
13-4As above, but the trap is big enough for an entire party (provided they're travelling close together).
15-6A cloud of gas is released - roll on the 'Gas Clouds' table below.
21-2as above.
23-4Projectiles are released from a hidden mechanism in the wall (roll again: 1-4 arrows 5-6 daggers).
25-6Projectiles are released from a hidden mechanism in the wall (roll again: 1-4 poison darts 5-6 daggers).
31-2Teleportation beam - anyone who fails to dodge is teleported. Roll on the Teleportation table below.
33-4Anyone who fails to dodge is sprayed with a jet of liquid, which makes them more likely to be smelled by predators.
35-6As above, but a cloud of mist instead of a jet of liquid. The trap can't be dodged, but has less of an effect.
41-2An alarm brings many hostile creatures (roll 2 dice for the number of minutes they take to arrive).
43-4As above, and in addition a net drops, trapping anyone who fails to get out of the way.
45-6A door slides open, revealing a hidden alcove which contains an unliving guardian (if the GM uses the tables in the Creatures section, count this creature as an Animate).
51-2as above.
53-4Rocks fall behind the heroes. Roll 3 dice: it will take that many hours to clear the obstacle, divided by the number of people working.
55-6As above, but the rocks drop ahead of the heroes.
61-2An anti-magic field may cause magic items to temporarily or permanently lose their properties. Magic creatures, and living magic items, will suffer damage or be destroyed, but will also be likely to sense the field from far away.
63-4Smoke rises from the floor, obscuring the heroes' vision. (Roll again: 1-3, also roll on the 'Gas Clouds' table below, 4-6 the smoke has no other bad effect).
65-6The area magically becomes arctic: the walls and floor turn to slippery ice, and the temperature drops. Characters with poor balance are likely to fall, and may be unable to get up or move. They may also suffer damage from the severe cold. Many of the dungeon's inhabitants may return to their lairs until the effect passes. If you're using the 'Climate' table below, the area will be very cold. Roll 1 dice and multiply by 20 minutes to see how long the effect will last.
 
 
Teleportation
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2Back to the dungeon entrance.
1-23-4To a cell somewhere in the dungeon, where they will find themselves in chains.
1-25-6To the bottom of a high pit somewhere in the dungeon.
3-41-2To an inter-dimensional arena, where they will be confronted with a victim of a similar trap, and will have to fight to the death unless they can make peace with them. The arena will have 2-4 exits (ie roll again: 1-2 = 2, 3-4 = 3, 5-6 = 4). For where each leads, roll again on this table. The exit can lead to another inter-dimensional arena. If the result talks about a dungeon level, treat the arena as if it was on the level which led to it.
3-43-4To the rooms of the main villain of the dungeon, where they will find themselves in chains.
3-45-6To a safe place on the surface, but far away from the dungeon.
5-61-2The very lowest level of the dungeon. Roll again if the trap is itself on the lowest level.
5-63-4The next lowest level of the dungeon. Roll again if the trap is itself on the lowest level.
5-65-6A randomly selected lower level of the dungeon. Re-roll if the trap is itself on the lowest level.
 
 
Gas Clouds
source or inspiration: Aaron Thorne
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2Poison - anyone who breathes the gas will be damaged or killed.
1-23-4Rusts metal items, such as some armour and weapons.
1-25-6Anyone who breathes the gas and fails to resist its effects will go blind. Roll 1 dice for the number of minutes this will last.
3-41-2Anyone who breathes the gas and fails to resist its effects will fall unconscious. Roll 2 dice for the number of minutes this will last.
3-43-4Anyone who breathes the gas and fails to resist its effects will go beserk. Roll as above for duration.
3-45-6Anyone who breathes the gas and fails to resist its effects will become hysterical with fear, and will run screaming in a random direction. Roll as above for duration.
5-61-2Anyone who breathes the gas and fails to resist its effects will have their intelligence severely reduced for 24 hours.
5-63-4Anyone who breathes the gas and fails to resist its effects will have their coordination severely reduced for 24 hours.
5-65-6Anyone who breathes the gas and fails to resist its effects will have both their intelligence and their coordination severely reduced for 24 hours.
 
 
Unusual City Locations
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Flies - on the back of a giant animal.
13-4Flies - by magic.
15-6Flies - by mechanical means.
21-2Is on an island in the middle of a lake.
23-4Is a series of ships linked together.
25-6Was originally a large tomb, and was colonised until it became a city (roll again 1-3 a single giant tomb, 4-6 a 'necropolis' - a series of small tombs).
31-2Was originally a craft from another world, and was turned into a city (roll again 1-2 the inhabitants are descendents of the craft's crew, 3-4 the inhabitants are from the normal game world, 5 descendents of locals and aliens both live in the city, 6 most inhabitants of the city are descended from both aliens and locals).
33-4Under the sea (optionally roll again 1-3 the inhabitants are sea creatures such as mermaids and mermen, 4 the inhabitants are biologically land-dwellers - the city is protected from the sea by a dome 5 as 4, but the city is a giant mechanical construction like a submarine 6 as 4&5, but the city is in the belly of a giant sea creature).
35-6In the belly of a living creature (roll again 1-3 the creature is stationary, 4-6 it moves around frequently).
41-2The city is the 'head' of a giant mechanical creature (roll again 1-3 the creature is stationary, 4-6 it moves around frequently).
43-4On the back of a giant sea creature, which cruises just below the surface so that most of the city is above the waves.
45-6In a hollowed out mountain. However the inhabitants aren't dwarves or other subterranean folk, but surface-dwellers who are attempting to hide.
51-2The whole city is the size of a human fist, and may only be entered or exited by magical means.
53-4What looks like a painting of the city is actually the city's only entrance.
55-6What looks like a book about the city is actually the city's only entrance.
61-2What looks like a map of the city is actually the city's only entrance.
63-4A failed magical experiment causes the city to disappear from one location and appear at another, apparently randomly.
65-6Any door in the world may be an entrance to the city.
 
 
Rivers and Lakes
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Figures are given in metres. To get the distance in feet, multiply by three.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Streamlet: 1-6 metres wide.
2Brook: 6-36 metres wide (roll 1 dice, multiply by 6).
3Runnel: 12-72 metres wide (roll 1 dice, multiply by 12).
4River: 30-180 metres wide (roll 1 dice, multiply by 30).
5River: 60-360 metres wide (roll 1 dice, multiply by 60).
6roll again: 1=Geyser, 2=River - 1 dice x 60 metres wide, with a small island in the middle 3=Pond 4=Pool 5=Small lake 6=Large lake.
 
 
Forest
source or inspiration: Paul Elliott
 
The lower down on the list, the more likely the players are to meet dangerous creatures or people. The higher on the list, the more likely they are to meet friendly creatures or people.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2A hilly area, with banks and hillocks all covered with bushes and low trees, rabbit and vole holes pepper the banks, wagtails hop and flutter from bank to bank.
1-23-4Rich green leaves, trees open and leafy, birds filling the air with song.
1-25-6Light and airy, with tall trees separated by leafy spaces.
3-41-2A boggy part of the wood with willow and rowan trees, tall grasses and yellowing bushes, pools, bogs, trickling streams and mud pools are everywhere.
3-43-4Pine forest, with tall majestic trees and a springy litter of brown needles and pine cones, here and there saplings and bushes push up into the wide spaces.
3-45-6Grim and dark, trees weighed down with centuries of moss, bowing low to the ground.
5-61-2Stark area of withered trees, many leafless, the ground scattered with underbrush and branches.
5-63-4Pine forest, dark and soulless, soundless and dead, brown needles create a silent carpet, not a breath of air stirs, not a bird call or insect can be heard.
5-65-6Blackened stumps and rotting trunks, trees spotted with fungus and leaf mold stinking underfoot.
 
 
Desert
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 2 dice, use the total.
2Oasis. Roll again: 1-2 the oasis has water. 3 the oasis is dry, but water is 1 metre or 3 feet below the surface. 4-5 as for 3, but 2 metres or 6 feet. 6 as for 3, but 3 metres or 9 feet.
3Wadi - dry gully or gullies.
4Hamada - rocky, weathered desert with strange rock formations.
5as above.
6Erg - sand dunes.
7as above.
8as above.
9Reg - pebbles and gravel.
10as above.
11Flats - vast, level plains which may be covered with a crust of salt or other minerals.
12Drum sands - any movement can be heard for 1-6 kilometres (x 5/8 to get the number of miles).
 
 
Medical Treatments
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Roll again: 1-2 starvation 3-4 all-water diet 5-6 bread and water diet (or the equivalent, eg rice and water).
14-6Roll again: 1-2 prayer 3-4 fasting 5-6 prayer and fasting.
21-3Leeches.
24-6Surgery.
31-3Having a dog lick the wound (re-roll if not relevant).
34-6A broth of herbs.
41-3Making a sacrifice.
44-6Making a doll, and magically transferring the ailment to the doll.
51-3Bleeding.
54-6Finding the enemy who has cursed you.
61-3A pilgrimage.
64-6Roll on the 'Spell Requirements' table below, replacing 'caster' with 'patient' and 'spell' with 'treatment' as required.
 
 
Spell Requirements
source or inspiration: Barbarians of Lemuria
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3A special item is required (roll again: 1-2 a very common type of item, for example a rooster's feather 3-4 a rare type of item, such as a scroll made of human skin 5-6 as for 3-4, but there is only one such item in the world).
14-6The caster must be able to see their intended target.
21-3The caster must be able to touch their intended target.
24-6The spell requires a long ritual to perform. Roll 1 dice for the number of hours.
31-3A personal item from the target, such as a hair is required. If the target is inanimate, an equivalent such as a stone from the target building.
34-6The caster must conduct lengthy research to gain the special knowledge required for the spell. Roll 1 dice for how many weeks are required - this may be adjusted based on the magician's skills. If the magician doesn't have access to a magical library, they can't cast the spell at all.
41-3The spell may only be cast at a particular time (roll again 1-2 at a particular hour of the day, 3 on a particular phase of the moon 4-5 at a particular day of the year, 6 at a particular hour on a particular day of the year).
44-6The caster must bathe in water and essential oils, and entirely shave their body (roll again: 1-2 nothing else 3 and abstain from sex for a week 4 and fast for a day 5-6 combine the results of 3&4).
51-3The caster must permanently mark themselves with the details of the spell (roll again: 1-2 tattoo, 3-4 scarring 5-6 a brand which never heals).
54-6Casting the spell will (roll again: 1-2 disfigure 3-4 weaken 5-6 corrupt) the magician - or for more varied results, roll on the 'Effects of Powerful Magic' table below.
61-3A sacrifice must be made (roll again: 1-2 a common creature, for example a dog 3-4 a rare creature, for example a unicorn 5 an intelligent creature 6 a particular kind of intelligent creature, for example a child).
64-6The spell can only be cast in a particular place (roll again: 1-2 a common type of place, for example at any place where two rivers meet 3-4 a rare type of place, for example in any temple which has known no worship for at least 100 years 5-6 the spell may only be cast at one place in the world).
 
 
Effects of Powerful Magic on the Caster
source or inspiration: order99 from the Trollbridge forum,
James Maliszewski,
and James V from the RPG Site
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11No harm comes to the magician.
12The caster's hands will change, looking like they belong to the opposite gender - either a very 'masculine' man (hairy knuckles etc) or a very 'feminine' woman. This effect can only be removed by magic. It will not effect the hands' strength, dexterity etc.
13The caster's hands will change, looking like they belong to someone of a different age. If the caster is old, their hands will look like a baby's. If the caster is young, they will look like those of a very old person. If the caster is in the middle of their life, one will look like a baby's and one like a very old person's. The hands will continue to change as the caster ages. This effect can only be removed by magic. It will not effect the hands' strength, dexterity etc.
14Many minor effects make it obvious that magic is being worked in the area: animals panic and can't be calmed, milk sours for no reason, babies have nightmares and so on.
15The magician suffers a small penalty to a few randomly chosen attributes or skills (depending on what your game system uses), which will slowly heal.
16Roll 4 dice. The magician is unable to cast any more magic for that many hours.
21The magician suffers a moderate penalty to a few randomly chosen attributes or skills (depending on what your game system uses), which will slowly heal.
22The magician lapses into insanity for a week.
23The magician's finger- and toe-nails will grow at a fantastic rate.
24Roll 1 dice. The magician appears to age that many years. Their life expectancy is lowered and their physical skills may decrease, but they don't gain any wisdom or experience.
25Roll 1 dice. The magician is unable to cast any more magic for that many days.
26Roll 1 dice. For that many days, the magician is prone to fits of posession or madness. They may babble blasphemies or attack anyone nearby, even friends. They will remember nothing of these episodes once they recover. For each fit, roll 1 dice and multiply by 5 minutes to see how long it lasts.
31Animals will become nervous or angry around the magician. This may effect all animals, or only particular species. The effect may range from noticeable shakiness, to absolute panic, or even to attacking the magician on sight. The effect lasts permanently, although there may be ways to remove it.
32The magician's hair turns white. If it's already white, it falls out..
33The magician develops an incurable wet hacking cough.
34The magician acquires a waxy and pallid complexion. The second time they get this result, the magician is weakened by sunlight. They are about half as effective if in bright daylight. Overcast days, twilight or early morning have no effect. The effect lasts permanently, although there may be ways to remove it.
35The magician's toes and fingers become webbed.
36An unnatural thing appears through a bleeding rift in space and attempts to eat the magician.
41The magician is cursed with a permanent form of insanity (roll again: 1-2 a phobia 3-4 an obsession with acquiring a particular kind of object, 5-6 periodic hallucinations).
42The magician develops a limp in one leg. If they get this result twice, they're unable to walk unsupported.
43The magician develops a facial tic.
44Sores and boils cover the magician's skin.
45The magician periodically breaks into uncontrollable and maniacal laughter.
46The magician's nose begins to rot away.
51The magician loses their sense of (roll again: 1-3 taste, 4-6 smell. If the magician gets this result twice, they have lost both senses).
52The magician develops an allergy to a common (roll again: 1-2 food, 3-4 animal, 5-6 object).
53The magician's lips crack and bleed.
54The magician's tears will look like blood. If the magician gets this result twice, their urine and sweat will also look like blood. A third time, and they really will be blood, and so sweating, crying or urinating will weaken the magician.
55The magician's eyes (roll again: 1-3 bug out, giving them a frog-like appearance, 4-6 sink into their sockets, giving them a skull-like appearance).
56The magician's less-favoured hand withers until it's virtually useless.
61The magician suffers a large penalty to a few randomly chosen attributes or skills (depending on what your game system uses), which will slowly heal.
62From now on, the magician will be prone fits of posession or madness. They may babble blasphemies or attack anyone nearby, even friends. They will remember nothing of these episodes once they recover. There may be medical treatments which will help the symptoms. For each fit, roll 1 dice and multiply by 5 minutes to see how long it lasts.
63Roll 3 dice. The magician appears to age that many years. Their life expectancy is lowered and their physical skills may decrease, but they don't gain any wisdom or experience. The magician can die of 'old age' in this way.
64The magician becomes unnaturally thin and hungry-looking, and requires twice the food they did before. This condition may be treatable.
65The magician takes the form of a randomly chosen monster. Their abilities are the same as that monster, possibly meaning that they can't use magic again, with the exception that they will keep their own intelligence. If there are particularly powerful monsters in your game world, the GM may decide not to have them as possibilities, or to rule that the magician can't gain in power through this effect.
66The next time the magician is touched by the light of the Sun, they will melt away forever.
 
 
Countries 1: Country Size
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-31000 square miles, or 2500 square kilometres (roughly the size of Luxembourg).
14-62000 square miles, or 5000 square kilometres.
21-34000 square miles, or 10000 square kilometres.
24-68000 square miles, or 20000 square kilometres (roughly the size of Portugal).
31-312000 square miles, or 30000 square kilometres.
34-618000 square miles, or 45000 square kilometres.
41-324000 square miles, or 60000 square kilometres.
44-632000 square miles, or 80000 square kilometres (roughly the size of Scotland).
51-348000 square miles, or 120000 square kilometres (roughly the size of England or Mississippi).
54-664000 square miles, or 160000 square kilometres.
61-3128000 square miles, or 320000 square kilometres (roughly the size of Italy).
64-6256000 square miles, or 640000 square kilometres (roughly the size of Texas).
 
 
Countries 2: Total Population
source or inspiration: Medieval Demographics Made Easy
 
If you intend to use the 'Climate' table below, roll on that table first. Then, when rolling on this table, adjust as follows:
  • very cold or desert-like - don't roll. Count as if you'd rolled a 1 on this table.
  • mild - roll and add 1. Count a result of 7 as 6.
  • hot and dry or cold - roll and subtract 2. Count a result of 0 or -1 as 1.
  • hot and damp - roll and add 2. Count a result of 7 or 8 as 6.
  •  
    Roll 1 dice.
    110 people per square mile, or 4 per square kilometre.
    220 people per square mile, or 8 per square kilometre.
    340 people per square mile, or 16 per square kilometre (roughly equal to the medieval British Isles).
    460 people per square mile, or 24 per square kilometre.
    580 people per square mile, or 32 per square kilometre.
    6100 people per square mile, or 40 per square kilometre (roughly equal to medieval France).
     
     
    Countries 3: Largest City
    source or inspiration: Medieval Demographics Made Easy
     
    To find the population of the largest city in an area, first find the square root of the area's total population. Then multiply by...
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1ten.
    2twelve.
    3fourteen.
    4sixteen.
    5eighteen.
    6twenty.
     
     
    Countries 4: Second Largest City's Population
    source or inspiration: Medieval Demographics Made Easy
     
    Roll 2 dice, use the total.
    2One-tenth the size of the largest city.
    3as above.
    4one-fifth the size of the largest city.
    5three-tenths the size of the largest city.
    6two-fifths the size of the largest city.
    7half the size of the largest city.
    8three-fifths the size of the largest city.
    9seven-tenths the size of the largest city.
    10four-fifths the size of the largest city.
    11nine-tenths the size of the largest city.
    12there are two cities with virtually the same population, both claiming to be the largest city.
     
     
    Countries 5: Capital
    source or inspiration: James Hutchings
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1The largest city is the capital, the second-largest city is the commercial centre of the country.
    2The second-largest city is the capital, the largest city is the commercial centre of the country.
    3There is no capital: the ruler travels from area to area.
    4The largest city is the capital, the second-largest city the former capital.
    5The second-largest city is officially the capital, but in practice most government business happens in the largest city.
    6A city which isn't one of the two largest cities is the capital. This city is likely to be almost completely devoted to government (optionally roll again: on a 1-3, this settlement was made the capital to resolve rivalry between the two largest cities).
     
     
    Countries 6: Other Cities
    source or inspiration: Medieval Demographics Made Easy
     
    Roll on this table only if the second-largest city has a population of 8000 or more. Otherwise continue to 'Countries 7: Number of Towns.'

    If the total population of cities ever goes over the total population of the country, discard the last city you generated and go to 'Countries 7: Number of Towns.'

    Take the last city you generated. The next-largest city has a population which is...
     
    Roll 2 dice, use the total.
    2half the size of the last city. If the new city has a population of 8000 or more, roll again on this table for the next-smallest city.
    3as above.
    4three-fifths the size of the last city. If the new city has a population of 8000 or more, roll again on this table for the next-smallest city.
    5as above.
    6three-quarters the size of the last city. If the new city has a population of 8000 or more, roll again on this table for the next-smallest city.
    7seven-tenths the size of the last city. If the new city has a population of 8000 or more, roll again on this table for the next-smallest city.
    8as above.
    9four-fifths the size of the last city. If the new city has a population of 8000 or more, roll again on this table for the next-smallest city.
    10as above.
    11nine-tenth the size of the last city. If the new city has a population of 8000 or more, roll again on this table for the next-smallest city.
    12as above.
     
     
    Countries 7: Number of Towns
    source or inspiration: Medieval Demographics Made Easy
     
    Towns have an average population of 2,500. The remaining population will live in villages or other small settlements.

    If the total population of the cities plus the towns is higher than the total population of the country, adjust the average population of 'towns' downwards (they may be better described as villages), and assume that virtually no one lives in a smaller settlement.

    Take the number of cities, and multiply it by...
     
    Roll 2 dice, use the total.
    2four.
    3five.
    4six.
    5seven.
    6eight.
    7nine.
    8ten.
    9eleven.
    10twelve.
    11thirteen.
    12fourteen.
     
     
    Countries 8: Most Common Species
    source or inspiration: James Hutchings
     
    This table is for if you want to use more 'traditional' fantasy species.
    If you want to make a species from scratch, use the tables in the 'Creatures' section, but don't accept results of 'Monster' or 'Beast'.

    If you want to make humans more common than other species, you can roll a dice:
    if you get a 1 or 2 (for example), the result is 'humans', otherwise roll on this table.
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresult
    11-2humans.
    13-4humans, but all or most of them can work magic.
    15-6a non-human species which resembles an idealised version of humans: for example elves.
    21-2fairies.
    23-4a species which lives underground and resembles smaller versions of humans: gnomes, dwarves or similar.
    25-6a species which lives underground and resembles humans, but are less human-like in appearance than the result above: orcs, goblins, trolls or similar.
    31-2giants.
    33-4centaurs - optionally roll again: 1-2 barbaric 3-4 civilised 5-6 both types exist.
    35-6hobbits/halflings.
    41-2dryads and fauns.
    43-4talking animals of all kinds.
    45-6talking animals of a particular kind: roll on the table 'Creatures 5b: Animals' in the 'Creatures' section for which kind. If that species is smaller than a human child, then they're 'giant' versions of the species, whose adults are roughly the size of a human child.
    51-2dragons.
    53-4vampires. roll again: 1-3 they enslave humans as a source of blood 4-5 they manufacture artificial blood 6 they live off the blood of animals.
    55-6a species which resemble a combination of humans and animals: optionally roll on table 9a in the 'Creatures' section for which animal.
    61-2mechanical imitations of existing creatures: roll again, ignoring this result or the two below, for what species they resemble.
    63-4roll again - the people in this country are a mutated version of the result that are only found in this country.
    65-6roll twice more, ignoring this result: the first result is a small ruling class, the second result are more common but enslaved. If you get the same species twice, they believe themselves to be quite different groups - roll again: on a 1-3 the difference is obvious to foreigners, on a 4-6 the difference is impossible to see or imaginary.
     
     
    Good Magical Creatures - Titles 1
    source or inspiration: Abulafia, under the terms of their Creative Commons license.
     
    Roll on this table, and the one below. The creature will be known as 'the A of B',
    where A is the result on this table, and B is the result of the one below.
    For example, if you rolled 1,4,2,2 in that order, the creature would be known as the Queen of Wisdom.
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresult
    11-3Mother.
    14-6Queen.
    21-3Herald.
    24-6Bringer.
    31-3Lord.
    34-6Lady.
    41-3Knight.
    44-6Champion.
    51-3Shepherd.
    54-6Protector.
    61-3Servant.
    64-6Heart.
     
     
    Good Magical Creatures - Titles 2
    source or inspiration: Abulafia, under the terms of their Creative Commons license.
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresult
    11-3Light.
    14-6Hope.
    21-3Wisdom.
    24-6Mercy.
    31-3Justice.
    34-6Compassion.
    41-3Love.
    44-6Forgiveness.
    51-3Peace.
    54-6Harmony.
    61-3Beauty.
    64-6Pity.
     
     
    Evil Magical Creatures - Titles 1
    source or inspiration: Abulafia, under the terms of their Creative Commons license.
     
    Evil creatures' titles can be generated in a similar way to those of good creatures, as explained above.
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresult
    11-2Mother.
    13-4Queen.
    15-6Herald.
    21-2Bringer.
    23-4Lord.
    25-6Lady.
    31-2Champion.
    33-4Protector.
    35-6Servant.
    41-2Heart.
    43-4Overlord.
    45-6Emperor.
    51-2Empress.
    53-4Archfiend.
    55-6Duke.
    61-2Autarch.
    63-4Spawn.
    65-6Destroyer - in this case only, roll on 'Good Magical Creatures - Titles 2' for the second part of the creatures' name.
     
     
    Evil Magical Creatures - Titles 2
    source or inspiration: Abulafia, under the terms of their Creative Commons license.
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresult
    11-2Conquest.
    13-4Damnation.
    15-6Darkness.
    21-2Decay.
    23-4Despair.
    25-6Destruction.
    31-2Dread.
    33-4Famine.
    35-6Fear.
    41-2Fury.
    43-4Greed.
    45-6Hate.
    51-2Madness.
    53-4Malice.
    55-6Pestilence.
    61-2Ruin.
    63-4Sorrow.
    65-6Terror.
     
     
    Mighty Blows
    source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs and the Classic D&D Injury Table
     
    This table can be used for attacks from both hand-to-hand or ranged weapons.

    It can be used in make combat either more dangerous or less dangerous.
    To make it more dangerous, you might rule that every hit has a certain chance of generating a roll on this table as well as its normal damage.
    To make it less dangerous, you might allow characters who would otherwise die from a wound to roll on this table instead.

    If a result refers to a limb, roll one dice: 1-3 leg 4 favoured arm (usually the right) 5-6 other arm (usually the left).
    Note that a damaged arm will have some effect on the character's balance, as well as the more obvious effects.
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresult
    11-2Stunned: as well as normal damage, the target is unable to attack next turn, and their defence is also less effective for that turn.
    13-4Knocked over: as well as normal damage, the target is knocked over.
    15-6Stunned and knocked over (see above).
    21-2The victim's weapon is (roll again: 1-3 shattered, 4-6 dropped). The target doesn't take any damage. Re-roll if the target is using 'natural weapons' such as claws, or no weapons.
    23-4As above, but for whatever's in the victim's other hand (shield, lamp etc) rather than their weapon. If the victim drops a lamp, optionally roll on the 'Dropped Lamp' table below.
    25-6Blood in the eyes: as well as normal damage, the target will be less able to attack and defend themselves for the rest of the fight.
    31-2as above.
    33-4As well as normal damage, the victim gains a permanent scar. Roll again: 1-3 on the face 4-5 limb 6 chest or stomach.
    35-6Armour pierced: as well as normal damage, the target's armour is less effective. Roll again if the attacker's weapon is blunt (for example a club), or if the target has no armour or 'natural armour' (tough skin etc).
    41-2Head injury: As well as normal damage, the target will have (roll again: 1-3 lowered intelligence 4-6 occasional fits).
    43-4Damaged eye: The target will be unable to see normally out of one of their eyes. This will mean that they're easier to sneak up on, and less effective in combat. They're also likely to be disfigured.
    45-6The wound will be unusually difficult to clean and dress, and so more likely to become infected than other wounds. The target will be likely to get sick.
    51-2The victim's limb is broken (for crushing weapons like clubs) or otherwise rendered unuseable. Roll 2 dice and add 7 for the number of weeks it'll take to heal.
    53-4As above, but the limb is permanently damaged. After it's healed it'll be useable again, but it'll never be as effective as it was.
    55-6Unconscious. Roll 2 dice for how many turns or rounds of combat.
    61-2Severed limb. Roll 3 dice. The victim will die in that many turns unless they're magically healed, a tourniquet is applied (which is likely to only delay death, if that), or the wound is cauterised with fire..
    63-4Fatal wound. Roll 2 dice. The victim will die in that many turns, unless the wound can be magically removed. Natural healing will not be enough.
    65-6Killing blow: the victim is instantly killed (for example beheaded by a sword, hit in the heart by an arrow).
     
     
    Dropped Lamp
    source or inspiration: RuneQuest
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1Lamp keeps burning.
    2as above.
    3Lamp goes out but is undamaged.
    4as above.
    5The lamp breaks. If the surface is dirt, sand, or a similar porous material the oil will just soak into the ground. Otherwise it will spread, making the surface slippery (and flammable). In either case roll again: on a 1-3, whoever was carrying the lamp will have a significant amount splashed on them, and so can be easily set on fire.
    6As above, but the oil will spread and burn over a non-porous surface. In either case roll again: on a 1-3, whoever was carrying the lamp also catches fire.
     
     
    Climate
    source or inspiration: James Hutchings
     
    In the wilderness, climate will effect how likely the characters are to meet other living things (the more food that grows, the more life an area can support).
    Climates in order from most life to least life are as follows:
  • hot and damp
  • mild
  • hot and dry or cold
  • very cold, or desert-like during the early morning
  • desert-like, at any other time.
  • Dungeons: For more realistic dungeons, take the climate of the surrounding area, but adjust it to reflect the fact that underground areas will be sheltered from extremes of weather:
    • very cold area = cold dungeon.
    • cold, mild, hot and damp, or hot and dry area = mild dungeon.
    • desert-like area = hot and dry dungeon.
    For more traditional dungeons, just roll randomly - either once for the whole dungeon, or seperately for different areas (for example once for each level).

    Climate also effects the characters likelihood of catching diseases - for more detail, see the Disease table (Wilderness, Settlements and Dungeons sections).
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1very cold - Freezing or below. As for cold (below), but worse. Also, some surfaces may be slippery with ice.
    2cold - Cold, but above freezing. Characters are at risk of suffering damage from the weather. Heavy clothing, shelter, and a fire will all make characters less likely to suffer damage.
    3mild - Characters will suffer no ill effects from the climate.
    4hot and damp - Characters will tire more quickly. Armour will be more of a burden. Wounds will be more likely to become infected.
    5hot and dry - Characters will tire more quickly, and need more water. Armour will be more of a burden - heavier armour is likely to be impossible to wear.
    6desert-like - During the early morning, treat as hot and dry. From mid-morning to sunset, treat as hot and dry only worse. At night, treat as very cold.
     
     
    Magic Symbols
    source or inspiration: Pictures from The Lesser Key of Solomon.
    Thanks to Casey777 for pointing me towards this.
     
    These symbols use Roman letters (the alphabet used in English and other languages).
    Depending on your campaign world, you might want to replace these.
     
    Roll 3 dice.
    1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
    11-31-3
    11-34-6
    14-61-3
    14-64-6
    21-31-3
    21-34-6
    24-61-3
    24-64-6
    31-31-3
    31-34-6
    34-61-3
    34-64-6
    41-31-3
    41-34-6
    44-61-3
    44-64-6
    51-31-3
    51-34-6
    54-61-3
    54-64-6
    61-31-3
    61-34-6
    64-61-3
    64-64-6
     
     
    Secrets of the Ancients A
    source or inspiration: James Hutchings
     
    Roll on tables A, B and C, and combine (in that order) to get the name of an unfathomable device of the Ancients.
     
    Roll 3 dice.
    1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
    1-21-21-2all-seeing.
    1-21-23-4analytical-predictive.
    1-21-25-6antedeluvian.
    1-23-41-2chromatic.
    1-23-43-4core.
    1-23-45-6cycloptic.
    1-25-61-2dimensional.
    1-25-63-4electrical.
    1-25-65-6electromagnetic.
    3-41-21-2endochronic.
    3-41-23-4fey.
    3-41-25-6forbidden.
    3-43-41-2gamma.
    3-43-43-4geomantic.
    3-43-45-6gravitational.
    3-45-61-2gravitomagnetic.
    3-45-63-4hydromantic.
    3-45-65-6infernal.
    5-61-21-2magnetic.
    5-61-23-4neutrino.
    5-61-25-6non-Euclidian.
    5-63-41-2phased.
    5-63-43-4quantum.
    5-63-45-6resonating.
    5-65-61-2stochastic.
    5-65-63-4temporal.
    5-65-65-6steam.
     
     
    Secrets of the Ancients B
    source or inspiration: James Hutchings
     
    Roll 3 dice.
    1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
    1-21-21-2anti-matter.
    1-21-23-4bewitchment.
    1-21-25-6damnation.
    1-23-41-2dark matter.
    1-23-43-4displacement.
    1-23-45-6dragon.
    1-25-61-2elder.
    1-25-63-4flux.
    1-25-65-6hex.
    3-41-21-2homunculus.
    3-41-23-4immolation.
    3-41-25-6ion.
    3-43-41-2matter.
    3-43-43-4necro-.
    3-43-45-6particle.
    3-45-61-2photon.
    3-45-63-4plasma.
    3-45-65-6polarity.
    5-61-21-2propulsion.
    5-61-23-4were-.
    5-61-25-6summoning.
    5-63-41-2superstring.
    5-63-43-4teleportation.
    5-63-45-6transmutation.
    5-65-61-2vibrational.
    5-65-63-4warding.
    5-65-65-6warp.
     
     
    Secrets of the Ancients C
    source or inspiration: James Hutchings
     
    Roll 3 dice.
    1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
    1-21-21-2beam.
    1-21-23-4capacitator.
    1-21-25-6cauldron.
    1-23-41-2chamber.
    1-23-43-4circuit.
    1-23-45-6coil.
    1-25-61-2compensator.
    1-25-63-4crown.
    1-25-65-6drive.
    3-41-21-2emitter.
    3-41-23-4engine.
    3-41-25-6field.
    3-43-41-2gem.
    3-43-43-4generator.
    3-43-45-6grid.
    3-45-61-2gun.
    3-45-63-4idol.
    3-45-65-6matrix.
    5-61-21-2modulator.
    5-61-23-4projector.
    5-61-25-6ray.
    5-63-41-2regulator.
    5-63-43-4rune.
    5-63-45-6sensor.
    5-65-61-2stone.
    5-65-63-4throne.
    5-65-65-6wand.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Please note that all of these results have a subtable below.
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresultThe minimum dynamic elements necessarysee subtable
    11SUPPLICATIONA Persecutor; a Suppliant; and a Power in authority, whose decision is doubtful1.
    12 DELIVERANCEAn Unfortunate, a Threatener, a Rescuer2.
    13CRIME Pursued by VengeanceAn Avenger and a Criminal3.
    14VENGEANCE Taken For Kindred Upon KindredAvenging Kinsman; Guilty Kinsman; Remembrance of the Victim, a Relative of Both4.
    15PURSUITPunishment and Fugitive5.
    16DISASTERA Vanquished Power; a Victorious Enemy or a Messenger6.
    21FALLING PREY To Cruelty Or MisfortuneAn Unfortunate; a Master or a Misfortune7.
    22REVOLTTyrant and Conspirator8.
    23DARING EnterpriseA Bold Leader; an Object; an Adversary9.
    24ABDUCTIONThe Abductor; the Abducted; the Guardian10.
    25THE ENIGMAInterrogator, Seeker and Problem11.
    26OBTAININGA Solicitor and an Adversary Who is Refusing, or an Arbitrator and Opposing Parties12.
    31ENMITY Of KinsmenA Malevolent Kinsman; a Hated or Reciprocally Hating Kinsman13.
    32RIVALRY Of KinsmenThe Preferred Kinsman; the Rejected Kinsman; the Object14.
    33MURDEROUS AdulteryTwo Adulterers; a Betrayed Husband or Wife15.
    34MADNESSMadman and Victim16.
    35FATAL ImprudenceThe Imprudent; the Victim or the Object Lost17.
    36INVOLUNTARY Crimes Of LoveThe Lover, the Beloved; the Revealer18.
    41SLAYING of a Kinsman UnrecognizedThe Slayer, the Unrecognized Victim19.
    42SELF-Sacrificing For An IdealThe Hero; the Ideal; the 'Creditor' or the Person or Thing Sacrificed20.
    43SELF-Sacrifice For KindredThe Hero; the Kinsman; the 'Creditor' or the Person or Thing Sacrificed21.
    44ALL Sacrificed For A PassionThe Lover, the Object of the Fatal Passion; the Person or Thing Sacrificed22.
    45NECESSITY Of Sacrificing Loved OnesThe Hero; the Beloved Victim; the Necessity for the Sacrifice23.
    46RIVALRY Of Superior And InferiorThe Superior Rival; the Inferior Rival; the Object24.
    51ADULTERYA Deceived Husband or Wife; Two Adulterers25.
    52CRIMES Of LoveThe Lover, the Beloved26.
    53DISCOVERY Of The Dishonor Of A Loved OneThe Discoverer; the Guilty One27.
    54OBSTACLES To LoveTwo Lovers, an Obstacle28.
    55AN ENEMY LovedThe Beloved Enemy; the Lover; the Hater29.
    56AMBITIONan Ambitious Person; a Thing Coveted; an Adversary30.
    61CONFLICT With A GodA Mortal, an Immortal31.
    62MISTAKEN JealousyThe Jealous One; the Object of Whose Possession He is Jealous; the Supposed Accomplice; the Cause or the Author of the Mistake32.
    63ERRONEOUS JudgmentThe Mistaken One; the Victim of the Mistake; the Cause or Author of the Mistake; the Guilty Person33.
    64REMORSEThe Culprit; the Victim or the Sin; the Interrogator34.
    65RECOVERY Of A Lost OneThe Seeker; the One Found35.
    66LOSS Of Loved OnesA Kinsman Slain; a Kinsman Spectator; an Executioner36.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 1: SUPPLICATION
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresult
    11-3Fugitives Imploring the Powerful for Help Against Their Enemies.
    14-6Assistance Implored for the Performance of a Pious Duty Which Has Been Forbidden.
    21-3Appeals for a Refuge in Which to Die.
    24-6Hospitality Besought by the Shipwrecked.
    31-3Charity Entreated by Those Cast Off by Their Own People, Whom They Have Disgraced.
    34-6Expiation: The Seeking of Pardon.
    41-3Expiation: The Seeking of Healing.
    44-6The Surrender of a Corpse Solicited.
    51-3The Surrender of a Relic Solicited.
    54-6Supplication of the Powerful for Those Dear to the Suppliant.
    61-3Supplication to a Relative in Behalf of Another Relative.
    64-6Supplication to a Relative's Lover, in Their Behalf.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 2: DELIVERANCE
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1-2Appearance of a Rescuer to the Condemned.
    3-4A Parent Replaced Upon a Throne by His Children.
    5-6Rescue by Friends, or by Strangers Grateful for Benefits Or Hospitality.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 3: CRIME Pursued by Vengeance
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresult
    11-2The Avenging of a Slain Parent or Ancestor.
    13-4The Avenging of a Slain Child or Descendant.
    15-6Vengeance for a Child Dishonored.
    21-2The Avenging of a Slain Wife or Husband.
    23-4Vengeance for the Dishonor, or Attempted Dishonoring, of a Wife.
    25-6Vengeance for a Mistress Slain.
    31-2Vengeance for a Slain or Injured Friend.
    33-4Vengeance for a Sister Seduced.
    35-6Vengeance for Intentional Injury or Spoliation.
    41-2Vengeance for Having Been Despoiled During Absence.
    43-4Revenge for an Attempted Slaying.
    45-6Revenge for a False Accusation.
    51-2Vengeance for Rape.
    53-4Vengeance for Having Been Robbed of One's Own.
    55-6Revenge Upon a Whole Sex for a Deception by One.
    61-2Professional Pursuit of Criminals.
    63-4Roll again but the 'criminal' is innocent.
    65-6Roll again but the vengeance is as bad as the crime.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 4: VENGEANCE Taken For Kindred Upon Kindred
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    roll twice. The first roll gives the relation of the subject of vengeance to the avenger.
    The second roll gives the relation of the one avenged to the avenger
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1Father.
    2Mother.
    3Brother.
    4Sister.
    5Wife.
    6Husband.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 5: PURSUIT
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1Fugitives from Justice Pursued for Actual Crimes.
    2Fugitives from Justice Pursued for Political 'Crimes'.
    3Pursued for a Fault of Love.
    4A Hero Struggling Against a Power.
    5A Pseudo-Madman Struggling Against One Who Pretends to Cure, But Instead Seeks to Drive Mad.
    6roll twice. The first result is the situation as the pursuer sees it, the second the situation as the pursued sees it.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 6: DISASTER
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresult
    11-3Military Defeat.
    14-6Political Disgrace.
    21-3A Fatherland Destroyed.
    24-6The Fall of Humanity.
    31-3A Natural Catastrophe.
    34-6A Monarch Overthrown.
    41-3Ingratitude Suffered.
    44-6The Suffering of Unjust Punishment or Enmity.
    51-3An Outrage Suffered.
    54-6Abandonment by a Lover or Spouse.
    61-3Children Lost by Their Parents, Through No Fault of the Parents.
    64-6Children Lost by Their Parents, Through The Fault of the Parents.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 7: FALLING PREY To Cruelty Or Misfortune
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1The Innocent Made the Victim of Ambitious Intrigue.
    2The Innocent Despoiled by Those Who Should Protect.
    3The Powerful Dispossessed and Wretched.
    4A Favorite or an Intimate Finds Himself Forgotten.
    5The Unfortunate Robbed of Their Only Hope.
    6Roll again but the 'victim's misfortune is (roll again: 1-3 deserved 4-6 imaginary.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 8: REVOLT
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1A Conspiracy Chiefly of One Individual.
    2A Conspiracy of Several.
    3as above.
    4Revolt of One Individual, Who Influences and Involves Others.
    5A Revolt of Many.
    6as above.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 9: DARING Enterprise
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1War.
    2A Combat.
    3Carrying Off a Desired Person or Object.
    4Recapture of a Desired Object.
    5Adventurous Expeditions.
    6Adventure Undertaken for the Purpose of Obtaining a Beloved.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 10: ABDUCTION
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1Abduction of an Unwilling Woman.
    2'Abduction' of a Consenting Woman.
    3Recapture of a Woman. Roll again: 1-3 Without the Slaying of the Abductor 4-6 With the Slaying of the Abductor.
    4Rescue of a Captive Friend.
    5Rescue of a Child.
    6Rescue of a Soul in Captivity to Error.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 11: THE ENIGMA
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1Search for a Person Who Must Be Found on Pain of Death.
    2A Riddle To Be Solved on Pain of Death.
    3As Above, but the Riddle is Proposed by the Coveted Woman.
    4Temptations Offered With the Object of Discovering His Name.
    5Temptations Offered With the Object of Ascertaining the Sex.
    6Tests for the Purpose of Ascertaining the Mental Condition.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 12: OBTAINING
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1Efforts to Obtain an Object by Ruse.
    2Efforts to Obtain an Object by Force.
    3Efforts to Obtain an Object by a Combination of Ruse and Force.
    4Endeavor by Means of Persuasive Eloquence Alone.
    5Eloquence With an Arbitrator.
    6An Arbitrator Who Must Be Bribed, Blackmailed etc.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 13: ENMITY Of Kinsmen
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresult
    11-3Hatred of Brothers -- One Brother Hated by Several.
    14-6Reciprocal Hatred of Two Brothers.
    21-3Hatred Between Relatives for Reasons of Self-Interest.
    24-6Hatred of Father and Son -- Of the Son for the Father.
    31-3Mutual Hatred of Father and Son.
    34-6Hatred of Mother and Daughter -- Of the Daughter for the Mother.
    41-3Mutual Hatred of Father and Son.
    44-6Hatred of Daughter for Father.
    51-3Hatred of Grandfather for Grandson.
    54-6Hatred of Father-in-law for Son-in-law.
    61-3Hatred of Mother-in-law for Daughter-in-law.
    64-6Infanticide.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 14: RIVALRY Of Kinsmen
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresult
    11-3Malicious Rivalry of a Brother, Not Reciprocated by the Other.
    14-6Malicious Rivalry of Two Brothers.
    21-3Rivalry of Two Brothers, With Adultery on the Part of One.
    24-6Rivalry of Sisters.
    31-3Rivalry of Two Sisters, With Adultery on the Part of One.
    34-6Rivalry of Father and Son, for an Unmarried Woman.
    41-3Rivalry of Father and Son, for a Married Woman.
    44-6Case Similar to the Two Foregoing, But in Which the Object is Already the Wife of the Father.
    51-3Case Similar to the Above, But in Which the Object is Already the Wife of the Son.
    54-6Rivalry of Mother and Daughter.
    61-3Rivalry of Cousins.
    64-6Rivalry of Friends.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 15: MURDEROUS Adultery
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1-2The Slaying of a Husband by, or for, a Paramour.
    3-4The Slaying of a Trusting Lover.
    5-6Slaying of a Wife for a Paramour, and in Self-Interest.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 16: MADNESS
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1Kinsmen Slain in Madness.
    2Lover Slain in Madness.
    3Slaying or Injuring of a Person not Hated.
    4Disgrace Brought Upon Oneself Through Madness.
    5Loss of Loved Ones Brought About by Madness.
    6Madness Brought on by Fear of Hereditary Insanity.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 17: FATAL Imprudence
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresult
    1-21-2Imprudence the Cause of One's Own Misfortune.
    1-23-4Imprudence the Cause of One's Own Dishonor.
    1-25-6Curiosity the Cause of One's Own Misfortune.
    3-41-2Curiosity the Cause of One's Own Dishonor.
    3-43-4Loss of the Possession of a Loved One, Through Curiosity.
    3-45-6Curiosity the Cause of Death or Misfortune to Others.
    5-61-2Imprudence the Cause of a Relative's Death.
    5-63-4Imprudence the Cause of a Lover's Death.
    5-65-6Credulity the Cause of Kinsmen's Deaths.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 18: INVOLUNTARY Crimes Of Love
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1Unknowingly Committing Incest.
    2Falling In Love With One Who, Unknown to You, Is A Blood Relative.
    3Unknowingly Committing Adultery, Believing the Lover To Be One's Spouse.
    4Discovering That One's Lover is the Spouse of Another.
    5The 'Crime' is A Crime in the World of the Story, But Not that of the Players (for example homosexuality, committing adultery when an unwilling party to an arranged marriage).
    6Roll again but the Crime Has Been Villainously Planned by a Third Person.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 19: SLAYING of a Kinsman Unrecognized
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresult
    1-21-2Being Upon the Point of Slaying a (roll again: 1-3 Daughter 4-6 Son) Unknowingly, by Command of a Divinity or an Oracle.
    1-23-4Being Upon the Point of Slaying a (roll again: 1-3 Daughter 4-6 Son) Through Political Necessity.
    1-25-6Being Upon the Point of Slaying a (roll again: 1-3 Daughter 4-6 Son) Through a Rivalry in Love.
    3-41-2Being Upon the Point of Slaying a (roll again: 1-3 Daughter 4-6 Son) Through Hatred of the Lover of the Unrecognized Child.
    3-43-4Being Upon the Point of Slaying a (roll again: 1-3 Brother 4-6 Sister) Unknowingly.
    3-45-6Slaying of a (roll again 1-3 Mother 4-6 Father) Unrecognized.
    5-61-2Involuntary Killing of a Lover.
    5-63-4Being Upon the Point of Killing a Lover Unrecognized.
    5-65-6Failure to Rescue an Unrecognized (roll again: 1-3 Son 4-6 Daughter).
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 20: SELF-Sacrificing For An Ideal
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresult
    1-21-2Sacrifice of Life for the Sake of One's Word.
    1-23-4Life Sacrifice for the Success of One's People.
    1-25-6Life Sacrificed in Filial Piety.
    3-41-2Life Sacrificed for the Sake of One's Faith.
    3-43-4Both Love and Life Sacrificed for One's Faith.
    3-45-6Both Love and Life Sacrificed for a Cause.
    5-61-2Love Sacrificed to the Interests of State .
    5-63-4Sacrifice of Well-Being to Duty.
    5-65-6One Ideal Sacrificed to Another (for example, One Who Betrays their Religion for their Duty to the State, or Vice-Versa).
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 21: SELF-Sacrifice For Kindred
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresult
    1-21-2Life Sacrificed for that of a Relative or a Loved One.
    1-23-4Life Sacrificed for the Happiness of a Relative or a Loved One.
    1-25-6Ambition Sacrificed for the Happiness of a Parent.
    3-41-2Ambition Sacrificed for the Life of a Parent.
    3-43-4Love Sacrificed for the Sake of a Parent's Life.
    3-45-6Love Sacrificed For the Happiness of One's Child.
    5-61-2As Above, But Caused by Unjust Laws.
    5-63-4Life and Honor Sacrificed for the Life of a (roll again: 1-3 Parent 4-6 Loved One.
    5-65-6Humiliation or Disgrace Undergone for the Life of a Relative or a Loved One).
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 22: ALL Sacrificed For A Passion
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresult
    1-21-2Religious Vows of Chastity Broken for a Passion.
    1-23-4Respect for a Priest Destroyed.
    1-25-6A Future Ruined by Passion.
    3-41-2Power Ruined by Passion.
    3-43-4Ruin of Mind, Health, and Life.
    3-45-6Ruin of Fortunes, Lives, and Honors.
    5-61-2Temptations Destroying the Sense of Duty, of Piety, etc.
    5-63-4Destruction of Honor, Fortune, and Life by Erotic Vice.
    5-65-6As Above, but by another Vice.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 23: NECESSITY Of Sacrificing Loved Ones
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresult
    1-21-2Necessity for Sacrificing a (roll again: 1-3 Daughter 4-6 Son) in the Public Interest.
    1-23-4Duty of Sacrificing A (roll again: 1-3 Daughter 4-6 Son) in Fulfillment of a Vow to God/the Gods.
    1-25-6Duty of Sacrificing Benefactors or Loved Ones to One's Faith.
    3-41-2Duty of Sacrificing One's Child, Unknown to Others, Under the Pressure of Necessity.
    3-43-4Duty of Sacrificing, Under the Same Circumstances, One's (roll again: 1-2 Father 3-4 Mother 5-6 Spouse).
    3-45-6Duty of Sacrificing a (roll again: 1-3 Son-in-law 4-6 Daughter-in-law) for the Public Good.
    5-61-2Duty of Contending with a (roll again: 1-3 Brother-in-Law 4-6 Sister-in-law) for the Public Good.
    5-63-4Duty of Contending with a Friend.
    5-65-6Roll again but the 'duty' is (roll again: 1-3 a Mask for Baser Motives 4-6 Accepted by the the Society of the Story, But Not that of the Players).
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 24: RIVALRY Of Superior And Inferior
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresult
    11-3Of a Mortal and an Immortal.
    14-6Of a Magician and an Ordinary Person.
    21-3Of Conqueror and Conquered.
    24-6Of (roll again: 1-2 Monarch and Noble 3-4 Monarch and Commoner 5-6 Noble and Commoner).
    31-3Of a Powerful Person and an Upstart.
    34-6Of Rich and Poor.
    41-3Of an Honored Person and a Suspected One.
    44-6Of Two Who are Almost Equal.
    51-3Of the Two Successive Spouses of a Divorcee.
    54-6Of the Two Successive Spouses of a (roll again: 1-3 Widow 4-6 Widower) (ie one Rival is dead).
    61-3Of Captor and Prisoner.
    64-6Of a (roll again: 1-2 Noble 3-4 Monarch 5-6 Rich Merchant) and their Servant.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 25: ADULTERY
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresult
    11-2A Mistress Betrayed, For a Young Woman.
    13-4A Wife Betrayed, For a Slave Who Does Not Love in Return.
    15-6A Wife Betrayed, For Debauchery.
    21-2A Wife Betrayed, For a Married Woman.
    23-4A Wife Betrayed, With the Intention of Bigamy.
    25-6A Wife Betrayed, For a Young Girl, who Does Not Love in Return.
    31-2A Wife Envied by a Young Girl Who is in Love With Her Husband.
    33-4A Wife Betrayed for a Courtesan.
    35-6An Antagonistic Husband Sacrificed for a Congenial Lover.
    41-2A Husband, Believed to be Lost, Forgotten for a Rival.
    43-4A Commonplace Husband Sacrificed for a Sympathetic Lover.
    45-6A Good Husband Betrayed for an Inferior Rival.
    51-2A Good Husband Betrayed for a Grotesque Rival.
    53-4A Good Husband Betrayed for a Commonplace Rival, By a Perverse Wife.
    55-6A Good Husband Betrayed for a Rival Less Handsome, But Useful.
    61-2Vengeance of a Deceived Husband.
    63-4Jealousy Sacrificed for the Sake of a Cause.
    65-6Husband Persecuted by a Rejected Rival.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 26: CRIMES Of Love
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1Committing Incest.
    2Falling In Love With A Blood Relative.
    3Adultery.
    4Bigamy.
    5The 'Crime' is A Crime in the World of the Story, But Not that of the Players (for example homosexuality, committing adultery when an unwilling party to an arranged marriage).
    6Roll again, but the Crime Has Been Villainously Planned by a Third Person.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 27: DISCOVERY Of The Dishonor Of A Loved One
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresult
    11-3Discovery of a Father's Shame.
    14-6Discovery of a Mother's Shame.
    21-3Discovery of a Child's Dishonor.
    24-6Discovery of Dishonor in the Family of One's Fiancee.
    31-3Discovery That One's Fiance Has Previously Committed a Fault.
    34-6Discovery that One's Lover Has Formerly Been a Prostitute.
    41-3Discovery that One's Lover, Formerly a Prostitute, Has Returned to Their Old Life.
    44-6Discovery that One's Lover is a Scoundrel.
    51-3Discovery that One's Spouse is a Scoundrel.
    54-6Duty of Punishing a Child Who is a Traitor to Country.
    61-3Duty of Punishing a Child Condemned Under a Law Which the Parent Has Made.
    64-6Duty of Punishing One Parent to Avenge the Other.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 28: OBSTACLES To Love
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1Inequality of Rank.
    2Inequality of Wealth.
    3Enemies and Contingent Obstacles.
    4A Previous Betrothal to Another.
    5The Opposition of Relatives.
    6The Incompatibility of Temper of the Lovers.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 29: AN ENEMY Loved
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1One Lover or both Hated by the Family of the Other.
    2One Lover is Hated by a Close Friend of the Other.
    3One Lover is Hated by a Close Relative of the Other.
    4The Lovers are Members of Rival Factions, Parties, Sides in a War etc.
    5One Lover has Killed a Relative of the Other.
    6One Lover has Killed a Close Friend of the Other.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 30: AMBITION
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1-2Ambition Watched and Guarded Against by a Kinsman, or By a Person Under Obligation.
    3-4Rebellious Ambition.
    5-6Ambition and Covetousness Heaping Crime Upon Crime.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 31: CONFLICT With A God
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1Struggle Against a Deity.
    2Strife with the Believers in a God.
    3Strife Between two Religions.
    4Controversy with a Deity.
    5Punishment for Contempt of a God.
    6Punishment for Pride Before a God.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 32: MISTAKEN Jealousy
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1The Mistake Originates in the Suspicious Mind of the Jealous One.
    2Mistaken Jealousy Aroused by Fatal Chance.
    3Mistaken Jealousy of a Love Which is Purely Platonic.
    4Baseless Jealousy Aroused by Malicious Rumors.
    5Jealousy Suggested by a Traitor Who is Moved by Hatred, or Self-Interest.
    6Reciprocal Jealousy Suggested to two Lovers by a Rival.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 33: ERRONEOUS Judgment
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresult
    11-3False Suspicion Where Faith is Necessary.
    14-6False Suspicion of a Lover.
    21-3False Suspicion Aroused by a Misunderstood Attitude of a Loved One.
    24-6False Suspicions Drawn Upon Oneself to Save a Friend.
    31-3False Suspicions Fall Upon the Innocent.
    34-6False Suspicions Fall Upon one who is Innocent, but had a Guilty Intention.
    41-3False Suspicions Fall Upon one who is Innocent, but Believes Themselves Guilty.
    44-6A Witness to the Crime, in the Interest of a Loved One, Lets Accusation Fall Upon the Innocent.
    51-3The Accusation is Allowed to Fall Upon an Enemy.
    54-6The Error is Provoked by an Enemy.
    61-3False Suspicion Thrown by the Real Culprit Upon One of His Enemies.
    64-6False Suspicion Thrown by the Real Culprit Upon the Second Victim Against Whom They Have Plotted From the Beginning.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 34: REMORSE
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1Remorse for an Unknown Crime.
    2Remorse for a Parricide.
    3Remorse for an Assassination.
    4Remorse for a Fault of Love.
    5Remorse for Adultery.
    6Remorse for Betrayal of a Friend.
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 35: RECOVERY Of A Lost One
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1-2A Child Stolen.
    3-4Unjust Imprisonment.
    5-6A Child Searches to Discover Their (roll again: 1-3 Father 4-6 Mother).
     
     
    Dramatic Situations subtable 36: LOSS Of Loved Ones
    source or inspiration: Georges Polti
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1Witnessing the Slaying of Kinsmen While Powerless to Prevent It.
    2Helping to Bring Misfortune Upon One's People Through Professional Secrecy.
    3Inadvertantly Helping to Bring Misfortune Upon One's People Through Some Vice.
    4The Prophecy of the Death of a Loved One.
    5Learning of the Death of a Kinsman or Ally, and Lapsing into Despair.
    6Roll again, but the 'Loss' is False.
     
     
     
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