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TABLES FOR FABLES
A collection of free tables for fantasy role-playing games.
 
Welcome to Tables for Fables. This is a collection of random tables, all of which:
 
  • have a fantasy theme,
  • are systemless - that is, don't use statistics or terms from a single game, and
  • use only normal, six-sided dice (d6s).
If you have a table that you want to contribute, please email me (news AT apolitical DOT info).
 
You can look at all 342 tables, or look at tables in a specific category:
 
Magic and Religion(36 entries)
Treasure(23 entries)
Wilderness and Worlds(52 entries)
Dungeons and Combat(42 entries)
Personalising Characters(90 entries)
Settlements and Countries(82 entries)
Adventure Ideas(87 entries)
Creating Creatures(32 entries)
 
Please note that magic items are in the Treasure section, not the Magic and Religion section.
 
Many of the ideas in these tables are used in the automatic Adventure Ideas Generator.
 
Why This Place Fell Into Ruin
source or inspiration: Central Casting: Dungeons
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Inhabitants killed by a plague.
13-4The inhabitants were cursed, through no fault of their own.
15-6The inhabitants were cursed, due to their own wickedness.
21-2Monsters killed everyone, and still inhabit the place.
23-4Monsters killed everyone, and left the place in ruins.
25-6The (roll again: 1-3 water 4-6 air) was poisoned. Roll again: on a 1-3 the poison is still present.
31-2The inhabitants were involved in a war. When their army never returned, the place was abandoned.
33-4The economy that the place depended on collapsed.
35-6The surrounding environment degraded, due to the inhabitants' actions (for example, all the trees were cut down), so that the place was no longer viable.
41-2The surrounding environment degraded, through no fault of the inhabitants (for example, an ice age or prolonged drought), so that the place was no longer viable.
43-4The inhabitants lost their technology, and large cities no longer made sense.
45-6The place was built for defence. When the threat was no longer present, there was no reason to maintain the place.
51-2The place was destroyed in a disaster: Roll again: 1 fire 2 flood 3 volcanic eruption 4 earthquake 5 meteor strike 6 tornado or hurricane.
53-4As above, but the disaster was caused by a magical experiment gone wrong.
55-6The inhabitants seem to have disappeared in an instant.
61-2The advanced inhabitants went to another planet.
63-4The advanced inhabitants became creatures of pure energy. Roll again: on a 1-3 they still inhabit the place.
65-6The place was never inhabited: it is a life-size model.
 
 
Paralysing Monsters
source or inspiration: Eric Minton
 
This table is used to decide the tactics of creatures who disable their opponents without killing them: for example by sending them to sleep, paralysis, throwing a net etc.

It can be used for unintelligent or intelligent creatures, including humans. The less intelligent a creature is, the more likely it will do the same thing each time. For intelligent creatures, the GM should subtract from the roll if the creatures are outnumbered or losing the battle, and add to it if they're more numerous or winning. Some results will be inappropriate for some types of creatures and should be re-rolled.
 
Roll 1 dice.
roll, modified if appropriate
Less than 1Flee for safety, hoping their opponents will tend to their disabled comrades instead of pursuing.
1Flee in hopes of luring their opponents after them (possibly into a trap), then double back to seize their disabled opponents.
2Kill the disabled opponents.
3 or 4Whenever an opponent is paralyzed, pick them up and carry them off.
5 or 6Ignore disabled opponents while there are other opponents left standing.
more than 6Unless directly engaged in combat, kill disabled opponents, and spend the rest of the combat eating them.
 
 
What's At the End of the Rainbow
source or inspiration: Norman Harman
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2A pleasant land, which the heroes heard of once in a lullaby.
1-23-4The rainbow is a bridge, which leads to the Moon.
1-25-6The rainbow is a bridge to Valhalla (the Viking heaven), guarded by the god Heimdall. He will not let the heroes pass unless they complete an appropriate quest.
3-41-2As above, but 'Heimdall' is really the trickster-god Loki, and his quest will seem to be noble but will cause evil.
3-43-4A pot of gold.
3-45-6As above, but the pot is a trap, laid by a group of vicious leprechauns who wait in ambush (that's how they get their gold).
5-61-2A huge rainbow cake.
5-63-4A wizard, Roy G. Biv.
5-65-6The rainbow is a gigantic serpent (not necessarily hostile).
 
 
Mount Reactions
source or inspiration: Aeons & Augauries
 
This table is designed for when a mount is faced with combat, or a situation such as a snake, fire, monsters etc. The GM should apply modifiers based on the quality of the mount (for example mules and warhorses might get a minus, normal horses a plus). Results of less than 2 count as 2, and results of more than 12 count as 12.
 
Roll 2 dice, use the total.
2Throws Rider The mount tries to buck the rider off, rider could get stomped and then horse flees..
3Bolts The horse breaks away/flees.
4as above.
5Stop The beast refuses to go further. It will take 1-6 minutes to get it to cooperate. It will bolt (see above) if the danger comes close.
6Whinnies The mount snorts, paws at the ground, whips its tail etc. This will give away the rider's position. Roll again, applying a -2 penalty, if the noise or apparent danger increases, or if the mount isn't out of danger in one minute of game time.
7Stumbles The mount will attempt to avoid the danger but will continue on the path. Roll again, applying a -2 penalty, if the noise or apparent danger increases.
8as above.
9Carries On.
10as above.
11as above.
12as above.
 
 
Priests
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table provides alternatives to the traditional 'cleric' class.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1There are adventuring priests, who may or may not have magical abilities.
2There are adventuring priests, but they never have magic powers. No temple with have anything to do with magic.
3There are adventuring holy men and women with magic powers, but they aren't priests. Officials of a church will always be non-player characters.
4There are priests with magic powers, but they never adventure. Player characters can go to them for healing, blessing etc, but they won't be player-characters themselves.
5All magic powers come from a god or goddess. There are no wizards other than priests (roll again 1-3 player characters may be priests 4-6 player characters can't be priests).
6People believe that priests have magic powers, but they are a combination of scientific knowledge, and the psychological effect of people's belief in the priests' powers. Optionally roll again: 1-3 priests believe they have magical abilities 4-6 priests know that they're tricking people.
 
 
Disease 1: Frequency
source or inspiration: HackMaster
 
Characters should gain a number of 'Exposure Points' per day, depending on where they are and other factors as listed. Note that a character's Exposure Points can fall, but can never go below zero. When a character's points equal or exceed 50, the GM should roll a dice. 1-3 indicates that they've contracted a disease. Whether they do or don't, they lose 50 Exposure Points after the roll is made. If your game system has an attribute like Constitution, Stamina, Toughness etc, the GM may make a roll based on that attribute instead (eg roll 3 dice, get a disease if the number is over the character's Constitution).
 
.
EnvironmentExposure Points Gained Per Day
marsh, swamp8
mountain, arctic or desert environments0
other wilderness2
dungeons2
village4
town5
city6-8, depending on how crowded
on a ship0-8, depending on how crowded
The GM should also apply the following modifiers:
sanitationIf the characters are in a settlement or on board ship, apply a modifier of -3 to +20, depending on how good the sanitation is, with 0 indicating average sanitation (average for a medieval-style society, rather than average for the modern First World).
tropical climate+4
sub-tropical climate+2
summer+2 (except in deserts)
winter-2
If the GM knows that a disease is present+1 to +20, depending on the contagiousness of the disease. Double if the character is in close proximity to those infected (eg a doctor tending them, or adventurers travelling all day with an infected fellow adventurer).
 
 
Disease 2: Symptoms
source or inspiration: 'Dragon' magazine
 
This table gives the effects of a disease, other than loss of Stamina/Life/Hit Points.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2shortness of breath.
13-4paralysis.
15-6blindness.
21-2deafness.
23-4numbness.
25-6fever/chills.
31-2skin sores.
33-4nausea.
35-6rash.
41-2drowsiness.
43-4insanity.
45-6bleeding.
51-2hyperactivity/inability to sleep.
53-4coughing and sneezing.
55-6fatigue, loss of energy.
61-2diarrhea.
63-4hallucinations.
65-6panic attacks.
 
 
Events at Sea
source or inspiration: post by user Nephelim on the Dragonsfoot forums.
 
The GM might roll on this table once for every week of travel.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3An island. Optionally, Roll on the 'Islands' tables below.
14-6An apparently uninhabited island - the crew can gather fresh water and food. Roll again: on a 4, there are actually hostile and dangerous animals. On a 5, the island itself is a living creature (roll again: 1-3 the back of a gigantic sea creature 4-6 the island is posessed). On a 6, there are hidden and potentially hostile people (roll again: 1-3 a whole group 4-6 a single person)..
21-3A message in a bottle. Roll again: 1-2 a treasure map 3-4 a captured person pleading for help 5 a scientifically-minded wizard studying the currents offers a reward if he's contacted and told where the bottle was found 6 as for 5, but the scientist isn't a wizard.
24-6A (roll again: 1-2 huge school of fish 3 sea monster 4 school of dolphins 5-6 whale). Roll again: on a 6, they aren't what they seem (roll again: 1-2 protected by a god, 3-4 wizards in disguise 5-6 human-like intelligence).
31-3Mermaids (roll again: on a 1-2, they will be accompanied by jealous and potentially violent mermen).
34-6Another ship. Roll again: 1-2 pirates 3 in need of help 4-5 friendly and willing to trade 6 mysteriously, no one is on board. The ship will have normal supplies which the crew can take (blankets, provisions, fresh water etc), but there is a 50% chance that these items will be cursed..
41-3Conflict among the crew or passengers.
44-6Strange currents that threaten to pull the ship off course.
51-3A storm, that might damage the ship and/or put it off course.
54-6Superstitious sailors demand (roll again: 1-3 that one of the crew or passengers be marooned 4 that the ship change course 5 to be let off at the next island 6 that the ship turn back).
61-3An omen. Roll again, on a 1-3, refer to 'superstitious sailors demand..' above. In any case, roll twice as often for events for the next week.
64-6A port, which is happy to accept the crew, trade, repair the ship etc. The only problem is that the map shows no port here...
 
 
Hirelings 1: Price
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table is meant to generate what share of the treasure hired non-player characters will want. In any given area, roll once for the going rate. If your game includes attributes such as Charisma, Haggling etc, these will effect the roll.

This table is meant for non-player characters in supporting roles, such as torch bearers, treasure-carriers, rowers, guides, interpreters etc. They'll always be last into a room, will only fight to defend themselves, and then only if they can't run and hide, won't test any potions etc. Characters who take the same risks as the players will want at least the same share as the player characters. If they have special skills, such as magic, they might want double.

The players can always pay less than the going rate - as little as half. In this case, the GM should roll at least once for each non-player character on 'Hirelings 2: Flaws' below. They can also pay more than the going rate. In this case they won't necessarily get better quality hirelings, but they will be more loyal: they'll be likely to fight if attacked rather than run, and less likely to abandon the players in danger.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1One fourth (25%) the treasure of a player-character.
2Three tenths (30%).
3Two fifths (40%).
4One half (50%).
5Three fifths (60%).
6Seven tenths (70%).
 
 
Hirelings 2: Flaws
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2Too noisy - will attract hostile attention.
1-23-4Greedy - eats twice normal rations.
1-25-6Steals from the party.
3-41-2Gets into arguments with party members.
3-43-4Overly frightened, and will make other hirelings frightened.
3-45-6Cursed, and will bring bad luck on the whole party.
5-61-2Physically feeble.
5-63-4Mentally feeble.
5-65-6Roll twice more, ignoring and re-rolling this result.
 
 
No Fishing
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
In the wilderness, if the heroes try fishing, they might attract the hostility of some guardian. The GM might give this a 1 in 6 chance of happening.
Characters skilled in magic and/or wilderness lore might be able to tell whether a given place will have a guardian.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2A priest/ess, outraged that the characters have fished in waters sacred to their god.
1-23-4As above, but accompanied by a crowd of worshippers.
1-25-6Similar to the above, but the god themselves appears.
3-41-2The fish are intelligent, and naturally resist this attempt to kill and eat them.
3-43-4As above, but the 'fish' are actually wizards who've taken on fish form.
3-45-6The fish are led and protected by a demon of the sea.
5-61-2A dryad allows no killing in her territory.
5-63-4A fish noble appears, demanding that the characters pay treasure to compensate for the loss of his kinsfolk.
5-65-6The water is alive, and treats the characters as if they'd attacked it.
 
 
Bandits, Pirates and Highwaymen
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2They'll kill everyone, even if they try to surrender.
1-23-4As above, but they'll take some captives (roll again: 1-3 as slaves 4-6 to ransom).
1-25-6They'll give their victims the chance to surrender, but if they refuse they'll try to kill everyone.
3-41-2They're mostly interested in capturing people to ransom them.
3-43-4They'll try to negotiate a 'fee' for allowing their victims safe passage.
3-45-6'Your lupins or your life!' They're obsessed with one unusual form of goods - eg only red clothing, or only clocks. They'll let anyone go who doesn't have this item. They'll try to kill anyone who has a relevant item and refuses to hand it over.
5-61-2As above, but their demands change from one set of victims to the next.
5-63-4They won't attack (roll again: 1-2 poor people 3 priests 4 anyone but agents of the hated government 5 members of their own religion 6 members of their own species if your campaign world has more than one intelligent species, or their nationality if there's only one intelligent species). Roll again, ignoring this result if you get it again, for their treatment of everyone else.
5-65-6They're mostly interested in driving people out of their territory. If their victims turn around and leave they won't pursue them. Roll again, ignoring this result or the one above, for what they'll do if their victims refuse.
 
 
Diplomacy
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table generates the relations between two groups. It can be used for tribes, groups of creatures in a dungeon, factions in a city and so on.

The two 'Conflict' tables, in the 'Adventure Ideas' section, give more detailed results for a single conflict.
Those tables are more designed to come up with an adventure idea quickly, whereas this table is more designed for 'world-building'.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1At war If the two groups come into contact, they'll fight each other or run. If the player characters are perceived as being allied with one group by the other, they'll have a severe penalty on any attempts to make friends. If the delvers present evidence that they've attacked one of the groups to the other, they'll have a bonus on such attempts.
2Hostile If the two groups come into contact, they'll often end up fighting each other. They certainly won't allow the other group to pass through their territory. If the delvers are perceived as being allied with one group by the other, they'll have a penalty on any attempts to make friends. This penalty will be less than if the groups were at war. If the player characters are being persecuted by one group, the other will usually shelter them, if only out of spite.
3Allied The two groups are quite friendly. They'll at least listen to the other group's opinion and discuss with them if possible, when deciding what to do with the player characters. If the player characters are perceived as being hostile to one group, they'll have a severe penalty on any attempt to make friends with the other.
4Strongly Allied The two groups will regard an attack on the other as an attack on them. They'll usually respect the decision of the other group in regard to how to treat the player characters.
5Wary The two groups would like to destroy each other, but fear the results of open conflict. If the delvers are perceived as being allied with one groups by the other, they'll have a penalty on any attempt to make friends. This penalty will be about the same as if the groups were hostile. The two groups are likely to help the player characters with any plan which will weaken the other group, but only if they can do so in a way that allows them to deny involvement.
6No Contact The two groups have no resource that they both want, and no way to beneficially work together. They're thus neither allied nor opposed. Re-roll this result if you want every group to be involved in a conflict.
 
 
Who Owns Yonder Castle?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table doesn't roll for different species, since that will differ strongly from one game world to the next.
The GM might come up with a chance of the owner being non-human, and roll that seperately to the roll on this table.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3A (roll again: 1-2 commoner 3-4 barbarian 5-6 mysterious individual who appeared one day), who was given a title, and the lands and castle, as a reward for their heroism.
14-6An order of priests who (roll again: 1 are never seen - people arrive, but they never venture out 2 oppress the people with their fanaticism 3 are charitable and kind 4 don't take their vows very seriously 5 cause strange lights with their study of magic 6 mostly keep themselves to themselves).
21-3A dragon.
24-6An evil wizard (roll again: 1-2 is also a noble, 3-4 has bewitched the rightful owner of the castle 5 bought it with their seemingly endless wealth, whereof no-one knows the source 6 created the castle with their magic).
31-3A benign wizard (roll again as above, but 3-4 becomes 'was given it in gratitude by the former owner').
34-6No-one but the ghosts (roll again: 1-2 the castle is really haunted 3-4 it's abandoned 5 Scooby-Doo style, an evil wizard is creating the impression that it's haunted 6 it was abandoned, but travellers now make use of it).
41-3We don't have a lord. We're an anarcho-syndicalist collective.
44-6Strangely enough, an actual feudal lord (or lady).
51-3As above, but they're unusually brutal and oppressive (roll again: on a 1 or 2, they're really a vampire).
54-6As for (4, 4-6), but they're unusually mild and just.
61-3As for (4, 4-6), but they're unusually brave and fanatical (roll again: on a 1, they're really a robot).
64-6As for (4, 4-6), but they're unusually decadent and corrupt (roll again: on a 1 or 2 they're really a vampire).
 
 
Solar Systems 1: What Is the Sun?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2A ball of dung pushed by a scarab/dung beetle.
1-23-4Paradoxically, it is merely (roll again: 1-3 a shield 4-6 a mirror) which reflects the real Sun.
1-25-6The eye of a one-eyed (roll again 1-3 god or goddess, 4-6 beast) (optionally roll again: on a 1-3 the moon is its stolen other eye).
3-41-2A nugget of gold, riding on a (roll again: 1-3 chariot 4-6 boat).
3-43-4The crown of a god or goddess, who rides on a (roll again: 1-3 chariot 4-6 boat).
3-45-6The burning wheel of a (roll again: 1-3 chariot 4-6 cart).
5-61-2A golden apple, which is eaten each night but grows again in the morning.
5-63-4The burning body of a dead and ancient (roll again 1-3 god or goddess, 4-6 beast).
5-65-6A burning ball of gas.
 
 
Solar Systems 2: What Shape Is the World?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
For results marked with a (&), roll on Solar System tables 3 and 4 below.
For results marked with a (+), don't roll on either table.
For any other result, roll on table 3 but don't roll on table 4.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3A sphere, like the real world.
14-6A sphere - however the world is on the inside of the sphere, with the sun at the centre (+)
21-3A sphere - however only the very top of the sphere is liveable, because people fall off everywhere else (&)
24-6A sphere - however one side of the world is always hot and the other always cold, with only a narrow band where people can live. Optionally roll again: 1-3 this is because the planet always keeps the same face towards the sun 4-6 this is because spirits of fire live on one side and spirits of ice on the other.
31-3A cube. Optionally roll again: On a 1-3 each side of the cube is dominated by a different 'element': for example earth, air, fire, water, wood and metal (or light and darkness).
34-6A pyramid shape. Optionally roll again: 1-3 square pyramid (four triangles and one square) 4-6 triangular pyramid (four triangles). Optionally roll again: On a 1-3 each side of the pyramid is dominated by a different 'element': for example (for a triangular pyramid) earth, air, fire and water, or (for a square pyramid) the same but with the square being dominated by darkness.
41-3A series of tunnels and chambers hollowed out of rock and earth - they may range from house-sized, to city-sized, to big enough to contain their own suns. The overall shape of the world/universe is unknown (or optionally roll again on this table, ignoring this result, for the overall shape of the world) (+)
44-6Flat, circular, with mountains all around the edge keeping the seas in (&)
51-3Flat, circular, with a giant snake all around the edge keeping the seas in (&)
54-6Flat, circular, with nothing at the edges to keep the seas in - ships can fall off the edge of the world (&)
61-3Flat, square, with mountains all around the edges keeping the seas in (&)
64-6Flat, square, with giant creatures holding up each corner. Optionally, roll on 'Creatures 5b: Animals' in the 'Creating Creatures' section for what creature (&)
 
 
Solar Systems 3: Does the World Orbit the Sun, or Vice-Versa?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1All planets travel around the sun.
2as above.
3The sun and other planets travel around the world.
4as above.
5Other planets travel around the world. The Sun is located on the world. The sun leaves the world in the morning from a distant land in the east,
travels across the sky, and returns at sunset to a distant land in the west. It travels east through the underworld during the night.
6The Sun travels around the world, but other planets travel around the sun.
 
 
Solar Systems 4: What Holds the World Up?
source or inspiration: Spelljammer
 
Roll 1 dice.
1A giant boat.
2A huge creature. Optionally roll again on this table for what the creature is standing on. Optionally roll on 'Creatures 5b: Animals' in the 'Creating Creatures' section for what creature.
3An infinitely tall pillar. Optionally roll on Solar Systems table 4a below for what it's made of.
4An invisible sea.
5Invisible clockwork, which also controls every object's orbit.
6Nothing: the world is hurtling downward through space. Luckily, the sun and other planets are falling at the same speed.
 
 
Solar Systems 4a: What Is the World-Pillar Made of?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll on this table only if directed to by table 4 above.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3dirt.
14-6air.
21-3fire.
24-6water.
31-3ice.
34-6wood.
41-3gold.
44-6silver.
51-3light.
54-6darkness.
61-3Roll on the 'Precious and Semi-Precious Stones' in the 'Treasure' section.
64-6Roll twice more on this table.
 
 
Effects of Hearing a Swansong
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table refers to the myth that a swan, just before it dies, will sing a beautiful song.
If the players are the kind to kill a swan in order to hear the song, the GM might specify that this won't work (for example the swan might refuse to sing if its murderers will hear).
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2The player will become obsessed with hearing another swansong, and will slowly waste away if they aren't pursuing this aim.
1-23-4The player will become terrified of hearing another swansong, to the point that they may become crippled with fear in the presence of a swan. If they actually hear another swansong they will lose the fear (and must roll again on this table as anyone else would).
1-25-6The player's singing voice will improve, but only when they're singing sad songs.
3-41-2The player's ability to write songs and poetry, but only sad songs or poetry, will improve.
3-43-4The player will be prone to crippling fits of melancholia, when they'll be almost unable to act. Only magic can cure this affliction.
3-45-6The player will learn the identity (and location) of their one true love.
5-61-2The player will have an increased ability to communicate with, and gain the trust of, all birds.
5-63-4The player will be completely unable to harm any bird (or eat any bird) - even monstrous ones, and even if they're being attacked. Only magic can remove this inability.
5-65-6The player, just before they die, will themselves sing a 'swansong', which will cause any who hear it to roll on this table.
 
 
Effect of Eating Unknown Fungi, Herbs etc
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2mildly poisonous - likely to make the person who eats them sick (optionally roll on the 'Diseases 2: Symptoms' table above).
1-23-4highly poisonous - may kill someone who eats them, or make them sick (optionally roll on the 'Diseases 2: Symptoms' table above).
1-25-6neither nutritious nor poisonous.
3-41-2nutritious - may be eaten immediately, but if eaten too long after it's picked it will be (roll again: 1-2 of no nutritional value 3-4 mildly poisonous 5-6 mildly or highly poisonous, depending on how long).
3-43-4nutritious - and will keep its value for a long time after being picked.
3-45-6mildly poisonous if not cooked. If cooked, it is nutritious - but if left too long, it will be (roll again: 1-2 of no nutritional value 3-4 mildly poisonous 5-6 mildly or highly poisonous, depending on how long).
5-61-2nutritious, and has a medical use. Roll on 'Medical Effects of Fungi, Herbs etc' below.
5-63-4has a medical use (roll on 'Medical Effects of Fungi, Herbs etc' below) but no food value.
5-65-6has a medical use (roll on 'Medical Effects of Fungi, Herbs etc' below), but eating too much may result in it being mildly or highly poisonous. No food value.
 
 
Medical Effects of Fungi, Herbs etc
source or inspiration: Monsters & Manuals
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2Calming. Roll two dice. The character is resistant to fear for that many hours.
1-23-4Deadens pain. Roll two dice. The character is resistant to pain for that many hours.
1-25-6Improves perception of magical effects. Roll two dice. The character is resistant to magical illusions for that many hours.
3-41-2As above, and the character's sight and hearing are also improved - or at least the character's ability to focus on them. As such they are less likely to wander into ambush, be unaware of someone sneaking up on them etc.
3-43-4Lowers blood flow. Roll 2 dice. The character needs less food and water, and poison will have a lesser effect, for that many hours. The character will however be sluggish and lethargic for the same priod of time.
3-45-6Lowers fatigue. The character can stay awake for up to 24 hours from when they last woke without suffering any ill effects. However after 18 hours they will have trouble concentrating, and after the 24 hours are up they are likely to fall asleep for 12 hours.
5-61-2Increases vigour. Roll 1 dice. The character is slightly stronger, more agile, can run faster and longer and so on for that many hours. However they are likely to be sluggish and lethargic until they next sleep.
5-63-4Improves natural healing. For the next two days the character will tend to get over illness and wounds more quickly.
5-65-6Gives a strange clarity. Roll 1 dice. The effects last for that many hours. The character will be less intelligent in general - but, strangely, will be more likely to notice when others are lying or concealing their true emotions.
 
 
What Are the Monsters Doing? 1: In Lair
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table is designed to decide what monsters are doing when the adventurers find them.
It's intended for intelligent monsters, rather than animal-like ones.
Use this table for monsters in their home/burrow/lair/nest/hive etc or the areas nearby that are their territory. Use the table below it for monsters that are encountered outside of their home territory.
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
1-21-21-2sleeping.
1-21-23-4having sex.
1-21-25-6arguing (roll again: 1 over their relationship 2 over politics 3 over religion 4 over money 5 over their status in the group 6 over a posession other than money).
1-23-41-2gambling with dice.
1-23-43-4gambling on a (roll again: 1-3 race 4-6 fight) between small animals (eg snails, rats).
1-23-45-6re-setting the area: winding up traps that've been sprung, removing adventurers' bodies, in less serious adventures putting in new treasure, and so on.
1-25-61-2two monsters are fighting (not to the death), a crowd is cheering them on (optionally roll again 1-3 they're also gambling on the results).
1-25-63-4two monsters are fighting to the death, a crowd is cheering them on.
1-25-65-6two monsters are fighting to the death, a crowd is trying to seperate them.
3-41-21-2they're meant to be on guard (roll again: 1-3 they're alert and guarding, 4 they're asleep 5-6 they're doing something else: roll again on this table). Optionally, roll on the 'Major Dungeon Locations' table below to see what they're meant to be guarding.
3-41-23-4trading.
3-41-25-6they're lost, and have set up a temporary camp/burrow etc.
3-43-41-2running away from another monster.
3-43-43-4roll again: 1-2 exercising 3-4 training for combat 5-6 sharpening weapons, polishing armour etc.
3-43-45-6performing a religious ceremony (roll again: 1 silent meditation 2 an animal sacrifice 3 a sacrifice of one of their own species 4 a sacrifice of an intelligent member of another species 5 a solemn ritual 6 a boisterous and ecstatic ritual).
3-45-61-2nothing - strangely, they appear to have simply been waiting for the adventurers to come along.
3-45-63-4the monsters are being punished eg peeling potatoes, scrubbing the floor with their bare hands.
3-45-65-6going to the toilet ('bathroom' for Americans).
5-61-21-2washing.
5-61-23-4one monster is telling a story to a group.
5-61-25-6one monster is lecturing a group. The group is (roll again: 1-2 openly bored and resentful 3-4 silent for fear of the larger monsters watching them 5 respectfully silent, alert and attentive 6 loudly enthusiastic).
5-63-41-2plotting against their rulers.
5-63-43-4playing sport.
5-63-45-6torturing (roll again: 1-2 a member of their own species 3-4 an intelligent member of another dungeon species 5 an intelligent member of a non-dungeon species 6 an animal).
5-65-61-2they appear to be dead, but spring to life when the adventurers enter the room.
5-65-63-4roll again: 1-2 eating 3 eating and getting drunk 4 getting drunk 5-6 getting drunk and fighting.
5-65-65-6waiting in ambush for whoever might come along.
 
 
What Are the Monsters Doing? 2: Wandering
source or inspiration: Mike Hensley
 
Some results are marked with an asterisk - *. This means that the GM should generate another monster or group of monsters, of appropriate power.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Returning to their lair after a fight (many of them will be wounded).
13-4Fighting with a creature or creatures of a different species *.
15-6Fighting amongst themselves (some of them will be wounded).
21-2Fighting another group of the same species *.
23-4Returning to their lair with a prisoner *.
25-6Returning to their lair with prey *.
31-2Returning to their lair with treasure (some of them might be wounded).
33-4Patrolling their territory.
35-6Hunting or gathering food.
41-2Chasing, or running away from, another creature or group of creatures (generate the other creature or group - the stronger side is chasing the weaker one) *.
43-4Building a new lair - digging a hole, setting up camp etc as appropriate.
45-6Sleeping - one or more of them are likely to be on guard, or sleeping lightly.
51-2They're lost.
53-4Looking for a place to sleep.
55-6Negotiating with another group of the same species *.
61-2Negotiating with a creature or creatures of a different species *.
63-4(roll again: 1-3 Going to 4-6 Returning from) a meeting with (roll again: 1-3 another group of the same species 4-6 a creature or creatures of a different species).
65-6Roll on the 'What Are the Monsters Doing? 1: In Lair' table above.
 
 
Cat Colouring
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2black.
1-23-4white.
1-25-6grey.
3-41-2orange.
3-43-4tortoiseshell (black and orange patches).
3-45-6paws, chest, and lower face white - upper face, ears, legs, back and tail are (roll again: 1-2 black 3 grey 4 orange 5-6 tortiseshell).
5-61-2van - ears and tail are (roll again: 1-2 black 3 grey 4 orange 5-6 tortiseshell), rest of the body is white.
5-63-4tabby - light grey and dark grey-black stripes.
5-65-6paws, chest and lower face white - upper face, ears, legs, back and tail are tabby.
 
 
Wilderness Locations
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
The GM should roll on this table more frequently for more fertile areas: for example once for every 5 mile/8km square area in forest or fertile plains, up to every 50 mile/80km square area in desert.

For a result of 'Settlement', the tables in the 'Cities and Towns' section might be helpful.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2Settlement.
1-23-4Roll on the 'Single Buildings in Wilderness' table below.
1-25-6Roll on the 'Castles and Towers' table below.
3-41-2Roll on the 'Wilderness Temples' table below.
3-43-4Ruin. Roll again for what it was before it fell into run: 1-2 settlement 3-4 single building 5-6 castle or tower. Roll on the appropriate table below for more detail. The ruin has a higher chance of being occupied than the surrounding land (usually by animals or monsters, but possibly by bandits, refugees etc).
3-45-6Underground Complex.
5-61-2Roll on the 'Special Locations' table below.
5-63-4Nothing.
5-65-6Nothing.
 
 
Special Locations
source or inspiration: Michael Curtis and Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Bridge - roll on the 'Bridges' table below.
13-4Bridge as above.
15-6Burrow of giant animals.
21-2Campsite.
23-4Hollow Tree - roll on the 'Hollow Trees' table below.
25-6Oracle - roll on the Oracles table below.
31-2A vein of ore, or precious stones, in an exposed rock face. Roll again for what: 1 tin 2 copper 3-5 iron 6 roll on the 'Precious and Semi-Precious Stones' table in the 'Treasure' section.
33-4A lightning-stuck tree. The blackened and splintered wood of the tree might be useful for making a magic wand, particularly one related to lightning.
35-6A stream or pond teeming with fish. However, there is a 1 in 3 chance that it will have some kind of magical guardian: if so, roll on the 'No Fishing' table above..
41-2A stream or pond with a moderate number of fish. There is a 1 in 6 chance that it will have some kind of magical guardian.
43-4A rocky promontory, tall tree, or other height that provides an excellent view into neighbouring regions, with the obvious exceptions of hills, mountains and forests. If there is a special location, lair, or other unique feature noticeable from afar, it is likely to be visible from this point.
45-6A narrow gorge. If there is a river or stream, the water flows through the gorge in a series of whitewater rapids. This makes water travel faster but more dangerous.
51-2A rock face or boulder that looks like the face of a humanoid creature. Roll again: 1-3 a natural oddity 4 the work of an intelligent artisan 5 a sleeping creature, a stone giant or similar creature 6 a dead creature, for example a troll that has been turned to stone by the sun.
53-4An abandoned (roll again: 1-3 mine 4-6 quarry). It has a higher chance of being occupied than the surrounding land (usually by animals or monsters, but possibly by bandits, refugees etc). Old quarries, in areas with sufficient rainfall, will have filled with rainwater, creating deep artificial lakes.
55-6A concentration of natural mystic power. There are more likely to be magical creatures here than the surrounding land. Animal-like creatures will avoid the area, but if there are any humans or other intelligent creatures in the area at least some will be likely to use it as a place of worship. There is a 50% chance that the location is protected by a magical guardian.
61-2A recent fire or similar disaster has rendered this land a waste. There will be no animals or creatures here (but no possibility of hunting or gathering food).
63-4An area of exposed rock containing numerous fossils. These relics may be that of prehistoric creatures or more mystical beasts depending on the campaign world. There is a 50% chance these fossils are worth a small amount of money to alchemists, wizards, some merchants etc.
65-6An ancient burial ground. Optionally roll again: 1 individual graves, 3 a single mass grave 5 barrows (raised artificial hills over graves) 6 raised platforms 7 roll on the 'Wilderness Temples' table below. Optionally roll 2 dice: on a total of exactly 4 or 5 the burial ground is haunted. Optionally roll 2 dice (unrelated to the first roll): on a total of exactly 3, 4 or 5 the burial ground has some treasure.
 
 
Wilderness Temples
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
This table is designed for temples in wilderness areas. Cities will be likely to have many temples dedicated to competing gods, and each of them will be likely to be smaller (though not necessarily to have less worshippers).
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Monastery or Nunnery - A central garden surrounded by living and worship areas, together with large meeting halls, workshops and so on.
2Pyramid: roll again - 1-2 smooth (Egyptian style), 3-4 stepped (South American style), 5-6 as 3-4, with a sacrificial altar at the top.
3Circle of stones.
4A single, rectangular building.
5A single, domed building.
6Several buildings clustered around a central temple. Roll again for the type of temple, ignoring this result..
 
 
Temples: What God or Goddess?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Most gods and goddesses will also have minor roles associated with their major one. For example, a god of the sea is likely to also be god of fishing, boats etc. In a society where people only pursued crafts if they were unable to hunt, a god of blacksmiths might also be the god of old age, or of deformity.

Some results are marked with a (+). If you get one of these results, and if the temple is in area where more than one intelligent species lives and intermingles, roll again. On a 1 or 2, the god or goddess used to be whatever the result was, but is now thought of by people in the area as simply a god or goddess of their species. For example: the GM decides to create a temple in a town inhabited by both dwarves and hobbits, for a dwarf god. The GM rolls 6 then 1, getting 'thunder'. They then roll a 1. This means that the god was originally the dwarves' god of thunder, but is now considered (at least in this town) to be simply a god of dwarves.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11roll again: 1-3 king/queen of the gods (+), 4-6 father/mother of the gods (+).
12women.
13men.
14marriage.
15love and beauty.
16marriage, love and beauty.
21fertility and agriculture (+).
22fertility, agriculture, love and sex (+).
23the seas.
24seas and rivers.
25a particular river (roll again if the temple isn't near a major river).
26a particular sea (roll again if the temple isn't near a sea).
31a good god/dess of wealth and prosperity (+).
32a fickle god/dess of wealth and poverty.
33death.
34fire (roll again: In very cold climates 1-3 god/dess of blacksmiths, 4-6 god/dess of the home. In very warm climates 1-3 god/dess of blacksmiths, 4-6 god/dess of disasters In other climates - 1 god/dess of blacksmiths 2-3 god/dess of disasters 4-5 god/dess of the home 6 has a dual nature as both a good and evil god/dess.).
35roll again: 1-2 blacksmiths and magic (+) 3-6 blacksmiths.
36the sun (or one of the suns, if your game world has more than one)(+).
41roll again: 1-2 hunting 3-4 war 5 war and hunting 6 hunting and the wilderness.
42thieves.
43the moon (or one of the moons, if your game world has more than one). If the cycle of the moon in your game world is roughly a month, as it is in the real world, make another roll. On a 1-3 this deity is a goddess, and is also associated with menstruation, and hence fertility..
44roll again: 1-2 art 3-4 music 5-6 art and music.
45wine and/or beer. roll again: 1-2 also food, 3-4 also sex, 5 also music, other than sacred music 6 only wine and/or beer.
46the creator or creators of the universe (+).
51wisdom (+).
52embalming and tombs.
53judgement.
54roll again: 1-4 evil 5-6 magic and evil.
55roll again: 1-3 healing (+) 4-6 healing and magic (+).
56winter.
61thunder (+).
62trickster.
63god/dess of the area that the temple is in.
64floods (may be a good god/dess in areas like ancient Egypt which rely on flooding for agriculture - in this case only, treat as (+)).
65dancing and athletics.
66roll again: 1-2 magic 3-4 magic and healing (+) 5-6 magic and evil.
 
 
Bridges
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
The GM may make another roll to see if the bridge has a troll or similar creature living under it (1-5 no 6 yes)
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Brick.
2Natural (eg stepping stones over a river).
3Rope.
4Stone.
5Wood.
6An unusual material: roll on the 'Dungeon Doors' table in the 'Dungeons and Combat' section.
 
 
Hollow Trees
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Nothing lives in it.
2Nothing lives in it.
3Pixies or similar creatures live in it.
4Stairs inside the tree lead down to the home of a magician.
5Stairs inside the tree lead down to the home of a family of underground creatures.
6Stairs inside the tree lead down to an underground complex (optionally roll again: 1-3 A benign underground city. The tables in the 'Towns and Cities' section might be useful 4-6 a hostile dungeon. The tables in the 'Dungeons' section may be useful).
 
 
Oracles
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1In a temple.
2In a ruined temple.
3In a forest glade.
4At the centre of a labyrinth.
5In an otherwise abandoned city.
6In a hut or cottage.
 
 
Single Buildings in Wilderness
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Cottage.
2Farmhouse - likely to be surrounded by worked fields, and to have associated buildings such as animal sheds and mills.
3Hall - this could belong to a local noble, or to a guild - especially one which requires an isolated location.
4Hut.
5Inn - likely to be near a reasonably well-travelled road.
6Manor House - Likely to belong to a local noble, and apart from the noble family will also have servants, guards etc.
 
 
Castles and Towers
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Optionally, roll again - on a 6 the castle or tower is deserted.

Other than those that are deserted, the larger a castle the more troops it will have. All castles and towers which aren't deserted will rely on surrounding settlements to provide food, irregular labour and so on.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Single tower - roll again: 1-2 A self-contained tower. 3-4 The last remaining part of an otherwise ruined fortification. 5-6 A beacon - this may have fewer guards than the other two options.
2Single tower as above.
3Small castle or fort. Roll again: 1-3 A self-contained tower with a surrounding wall. 4-6 A manor house surrounded by a moat.
4Medium castle. A central tower (keep), and a surrounding set of walls with smaller towers, probably with one gate.
5Large castle. A central tower (keep), outbuildings, and a series of surrounding walls, probably with more than one gate.
6Fortress. Several keeps and towers of different sizes, outbuildings, and a series of surrounding walls, probably with more than one gate.
 
 
Quality of a Shop, Inn or Tavern
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
If the establishment has more than one distinct product, you might want to roll separately for each one (for example, you might roll separately for an inn's food, alcohol and rooms).
 
Roll 1 dice. In a wealthy area, add 1. In a poor area, subtract 1.
roll, modified if appropriate
0 or 1Awful
2Poor
3Average
4Fair
5Good
6 or 7Great
 
 
Number of Customers in an Inn or Tavern
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
The difference between an inn and a tavern is that an inn rents rooms to travellers, and so will have bedrooms, stables etc. Both inns and taverns sell alcohol, and may also sell food.
Cross-reference the time of day with the area. The result is the number of dice that must be rolled and totalled, not the number of customers.
There will also be 1-3 people working in the place.
Note that this table is intended for inns and taverns in settlements of any size - smaller settlements will have less people, but also less places to go.
On the road, travellers will only find inns. Modify the result depending on how busy the road is.
 
Time of day
AreaMorningAfternoonEveningNight
Poor District, or on the road4465
Merchant District4562
Wealthy District2461
 
 
Islands: Coast
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Ringed by reefs.
2Ringed by reefs.
3Ringed by smooth, sandy beaches.
4Ringed by high cliffs.
5A variety of coastline exists.
6A variety of coastline exists.
 
 
Islands: Inhabited?
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 1 dice.
1No inhabitants.
2No settlements, but sometimes visitors from other islands.
3Was once inhabited, but now deserted.
4Small villages.
5A single large town, and surrounding villages.
6A powerful city, many large towns as well as villages.
 
 
Islands: Mysterious Events
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 2 dice, use the total.
2At war with a nearby island.
3A sage or magician is protected by the islanders.
4The 'island' is actually the back of a huge living creature.
5The inhabitants live in harmony.
6The islanders are regularly attacked by (roll again: 1-3 pirates 4-6 a cruel monster).
7The island has a gruesome secret. Is a god involved?
8Strange population - for example no children, no adults, no men, no women - and no one will say why.
9Under the sway of an evil god, goddess, witch, warlock etc.
10They've never seen outsiders.
11The island is the property of a god.
12There are athletic games underway.
 
 
Islands: Special Features
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 3 dice, use the total.
3Natural fountain.
4Waterfalls.
5Statues.
6Forests full of nymphs.
7Large caves.
8Ancient mines.
9Ancient road.
10Ruined fortress.
11Secret tower.
12Remote temple.
13Territorial markers - eg skulls.
14Chasm and rope bridge.
15A smaller island just off the coast.
16Carved mountain.
17Witches cave or glen.
18Roll twice more, ignoring this result.
 
 
Weather
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 3 dice, and look up the total in the column for the approprite season. This table assumes that the area has a wide variety of weather, from heatwaves to snow.

Snow: roll 1 dice, and multiply the result by 10 to get the resulting depth of snow in centimetres. Roll 1 dice and multiply by 4 to get the depth in inches.

To see if the weather is the same the next day, roll 1 dice:
Summer or Winter:
1-3 same weather as yesterday.
4-6 roll again on the weather chart.
Spring or Autumn:
1-2 same weather as yesterday.
3-6 roll again on the weather chart.
 
season
dice rollSpringSummerAutumn/FallWinter
3HotHeatwaveHotSunny
4SunnyHotSunnyBright
5SunnyHotBrightBreezy
6BrightSunnyBreezyDull
7BrightSunnyDullMist
8BreezyBrightDullWindy
9DullBrightMistOvercast
10DullBreezyMistOvercast
11MistDullWindyLight Rain
12WindyMistOvercastHeavy Rain
13OvercastWindyLight RainHeavy Rain
14Light RainOvercastHeavy RainFog
15Light RainLight RainHeavy RainFog
16Heavy RainLight RainFogSleet
17FogHeavy RainFogSnow
18SleetFogSleetSnow
 
 
Hindquarters of a Centaur
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Horse (optionally, roll on the Horse Colour table below).
2as above.
3Donkey the centaur will be likely to be less susceptible to fear and intimidation than most centaurs.
4Zebra the centaur will be likely to be more attractive, but worse at hiding than most centaurs.
5Camel the centaur will be likely to be able to survive in the desert and go without water for longer than most centaurs.
6Mountain goat the centaur will be likely to be better at climbing than most centaurs.
 
 
Horse Colour
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table may also be used for the horse parts of centaurs, and other creatures.

Grey: grey horses don't have grey hairs. They have white hairs mixed with coloured ones, like a person with 'grey hair'. Optionally, roll again for the other colour (1 black 2 light chestnut 3 dark chestnut 4 light bay 5 dark bay 6 palomino). Greys (including dapple greys), are born with a coloured coat which gets whiter as they get older; again like people, except that it begins sooner in the horses life. This process begins on the face. An older grey horse may be indistinguishable from a white one, except that a grey horse has dark skin whereas a white horse has pink skin. The difference is particularly visible around the eyes and muzzle.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2black.
13-4as above.
15-6light chestnut (light brown).
21-2as above.
23-4dark chestnut (dark brown).
25-6as above.
31-2light bay (light brown body, black 'points' - mane, tail, and lower legs).
33-4as above.
35-6dark bay (dark brown body, black 'points' - mane, tail, and lower legs).
41-2as above.
43-4white.
45-6grey - see note above.
51-2dapple grey (grey, with patterns of round white spots) - see note above.
53-4palomino (yellow-tan body, white mane and tail).
55-6blue roan (a mixed pattern of black and white hairs, except that the head and 'points' - mane, tail and lower legs - are black).
61-2bay roan (a mixed pattern of brown and white hairs, except that the head is brown, and the 'points' - mane, tail and lower legs - are black).
63-4leopard (white with coloured spots - roll again for the colour of the spots: 1 black 2 light chestnut 3 dark chestnut 4 light bay 5 dark bay 6 palomino. The mane and tail will be coloured as for the spot colour; remember that bays have black manes and tails, and palominos have white manes and tails).
65-6snowflake (as above, except the horse is mostly coloured, with white spots).
 
 
Ghostly Whispering
source or inspiration: Tabletop Adventures' 'Bits of Darkness'.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Beware!
13-4Cast off your flesh and join us.
15-6Danger!
21-2Death awaits!
23-4Halt - go back.
25-6It lives! It cannot be killed.
31-2Many enter, but no one leaves.
33-4We were once like yourselves, ere we wandered too deep into these halls (or ..into these hills, into these woods etc as appropriate).
35-6What are you doing?
41-2You cannot help me.
43-4It is too late.
45-6You shouldn't have come.
51-2Why come to die?
53-4Beware the deeps!
55-6Beware the fangs in the darkness!
61-2It is time to feed.
63-4Bring us your life.
65-6(the heroes hear nothing, but feel a sense that something here resents their presence).
 
 
Outsiders In a Group 1: Why Are They There?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table is intended for such things as a human living in a tribe of orcs (or vice versa).
 
Roll 1 dice.
1A scholar studying them.
2A priest, trying to convert them (optionally, roll on the Missionary Attitude table below).
3Exiled from their own society (optionally, roll again: 1-3 justly, 4-6 unjustly).
4Was found or taken by the group as a baby (optionally roll again: 1-3 found, 4-6 taken).
5A trader.
6Fell in love with one of the group.
 
 
Outsiders In a Group 2: Social Status
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table only refers to the subject's status in the group;
their status in the society they came from may be very different.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Lower status than most members of the group.
2Lower status than most members of the group.
3Accepted in the group.
4Accepted in the group.
5Accepted in the group.
6Higher status than most members of the group.
 
 
Missionary Attitude
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table gives a missionary's attitude to the people (or otherwise) they're trying to convert.
It assumes the missionary comes from a different culture.
It also gives the opportunity to make jokes about 'the missionary's position.'
 
Roll 1 dice.
1The missionary believes their hosts' religion is outright evil.
2The missionary has become unsure of what they believe. Roll again, ignoring this result, for the belief they most tend to.
3The missionary believes their hosts are good, but their religion is mistaken.
4The missionary believes their hosts' religion is an unclear, distorted, or primitive version of the priest's own.
5The missionary has started to take on some of the ideas of their hosts.
6The missionary has come to believe that the group's religion is a superior version of the priest's own.
 
 
Attitudes to Strangers
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table is useful to decide how a group, whether human or not, will react to strangers (most obviously the player characters)
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3They will attack or harass anyone who enters their territory.
14-6They will allow travellers to pass through their territory by a particular route, but attack them if they leave the route. They may also attack travellers who stop for too long.
21-3They may hide from travellers, or attack them, depending on how strong the travellers seem.
24-6They will hide from travellers. If cornered they will fight or give in, depending on how strong the travellers seem. If the travellers take any of their goods they may pursue them.
31-3They will be friendly to strangers, but won't give any help unless it's paid for (payment isn't necessarily in the form of currency). If the travellers are obviously close to death they will help, but expect payment afterwards. If the travellers take something without paying there is likely to be violence - either immediately if they're powerful enough, or as soon as they can call the sheriff / get a mob together.
34-6As above, but if the travellers are close to death they will help without expecting payment.
41-3As above, As above, but if the travellers are close to death they will help without expecting payment, and they will give information for free, only expecting payment for more substantial forms of help.
44-6They will give food, water and shelter to any travellers without expecting payment, but out of duty rather than inclination. They won't offer any help unless asked, or unless the travellers are obviously in a bad way, and will grudgingly give the minimum their code allows.
51-3They will willingly give food, water and shelter and offer any information they can, without expecting payment.
54-6As above, but if able they will willingly give other help, for example offering fresh horses or volunteering to guide the strangers.
61-3Roll twice more, ignoring this result or the one below. The better result applies to their own kin, the worse result to anyone else. 'Kin' may mean members of their own species, or a sub-group of that species, or a group defined in another way such as followers of a particular religion.
64-6Their reaction may be any that appear on this table, depending on a complicated system of omens, their mood at the time, or other factors: roll for each individual group of travellers, or even each individual traveller. There should be no rhyme or reason to their actions - they may attack a large well-armed group but hide from an individual, then give their best horses to speed the journey of the next person who passes through.
 
 
Rivers and Lakes
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Figures are given in metres. To get the distance in feet, multiply by three.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Streamlet: 1-6 metres wide.
2Brook: 6-36 metres wide (roll 1 dice, multiply by 6).
3Runnel: 12-72 metres wide (roll 1 dice, multiply by 12).
4River: 30-180 metres wide (roll 1 dice, multiply by 30).
5River: 60-360 metres wide (roll 1 dice, multiply by 60).
6roll again: 1=Geyser, 2=River - 1 dice x 60 metres wide, with a small island in the middle 3=Pond 4=Pool 5=Small lake 6=Large lake.
 
 
Forest
source or inspiration: Paul Elliott
 
The lower down on the list, the more likely the players are to meet dangerous creatures or people. The higher on the list, the more likely they are to meet friendly creatures or people.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
1-21-2A hilly area, with banks and hillocks all covered with bushes and low trees, rabbit and vole holes pepper the banks, wagtails hop and flutter from bank to bank.
1-23-4Rich green leaves, trees open and leafy, birds filling the air with song.
1-25-6Light and airy, with tall trees separated by leafy spaces.
3-41-2A boggy part of the wood with willow and rowan trees, tall grasses and yellowing bushes, pools, bogs, trickling streams and mud pools are everywhere.
3-43-4Pine forest, with tall majestic trees and a springy litter of brown needles and pine cones, here and there saplings and bushes push up into the wide spaces.
3-45-6Grim and dark, trees weighed down with centuries of moss, bowing low to the ground.
5-61-2Stark area of withered trees, many leafless, the ground scattered with underbrush and branches.
5-63-4Pine forest, dark and soulless, soundless and dead, brown needles create a silent carpet, not a breath of air stirs, not a bird call or insect can be heard.
5-65-6Blackened stumps and rotting trunks, trees spotted with fungus and leaf mold stinking underfoot.
 
 
Desert
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 2 dice, use the total.
2Oasis. Roll again: 1-2 the oasis has water. 3 the oasis is dry, but water is 1 metre or 3 feet below the surface. 4-5 as for 3, but 2 metres or 6 feet. 6 as for 3, but 3 metres or 9 feet.
3Wadi - dry gully or gullies.
4Hamada - rocky, weathered desert with strange rock formations.
5as above.
6Erg - sand dunes.
7as above.
8as above.
9Reg - pebbles and gravel.
10as above.
11Flats - vast, level plains which may be covered with a crust of salt or other minerals.
12Drum sands - any movement can be heard for 1-6 kilometres (x 5/8 to get the number of miles).
 
 
Climate
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
In the wilderness, climate will effect how likely the characters are to meet other living things (the more food that grows, the more life an area can support).
Climates in order from most life to least life are as follows:
  • hot and damp
  • mild
  • hot and dry or cold
  • very cold, or desert-like during the early morning
  • desert-like, at any other time.
  • Dungeons: For more realistic dungeons, take the climate of the surrounding area, but adjust it to reflect the fact that underground areas will be sheltered from extremes of weather:
    • very cold area = cold dungeon.
    • cold, mild, hot and damp, or hot and dry area = mild dungeon.
    • desert-like area = hot and dry dungeon.
    For more traditional dungeons, just roll randomly - either once for the whole dungeon, or seperately for different areas (for example once for each level).

    Climate also effects the characters likelihood of catching diseases - for more detail, see the Disease table (Wilderness, Settlements and Dungeons sections).
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1very cold - Freezing or below. As for cold (below), but worse. Also, some surfaces may be slippery with ice.
    2cold - Cold, but above freezing. Characters are at risk of suffering damage from the weather. Heavy clothing, shelter, and a fire will all make characters less likely to suffer damage.
    3mild - Characters will suffer no ill effects from the climate.
    4hot and damp - Characters will tire more quickly. Armour will be more of a burden. Wounds will be more likely to become infected.
    5hot and dry - Characters will tire more quickly, and need more water. Armour will be more of a burden - heavier armour is likely to be impossible to wear.
    6desert-like - During the early morning, treat as hot and dry. From mid-morning to sunset, treat as hot and dry only worse. At night, treat as very cold.
     
     
     
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