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TABLES FOR FABLES
A collection of free tables for fantasy role-playing games.
 
Welcome to Tables for Fables. This is a collection of random tables, all of which:
 
  • have a fantasy theme,
  • are systemless - that is, don't use statistics or terms from a single game, and
  • use only normal, six-sided dice (d6s).
If you have a table that you want to contribute, please email me (news AT apolitical DOT info).
 
You can look at all 342 tables, or look at tables in a specific category:
 
Magic and Religion(36 entries)
Treasure(23 entries)
Wilderness and Worlds(52 entries)
Dungeons and Combat(42 entries)
Personalising Characters(90 entries)
Settlements and Countries(82 entries)
Adventure Ideas(87 entries)
Creating Creatures(32 entries)
 
Please note that magic items are in the Treasure section, not the Magic and Religion section.
 
Many of the ideas in these tables are used in the automatic Adventure Ideas Generator.
 
Fantasy Titles: Structure
source or inspiration: Andrew Byers. From the Carcosan Grimoire
 
These tables generate titles that can be used for a monarch, high priest, or similar figure (or for a character who would like to be thought of as such).

Where the result says (A), roll on 'Fantasy Titles A' below, and so on for other bold letters.
Note that some results in Table C will tell you to roll on Table A again. Always roll separately for the two (A)s if this happens.

Optional: If the result includes (C), roll again: on a 5, replace the (C) with 'of the (A) (B)'. On a 6, replace it with 'of the (B)'.
Again, if there are two (A)s or two (B)s, roll separately for the two.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1-2(A) (B).
3-4(A) (B) (C).
5-6(B) (C).
 
 
Fantasy Titles A
source or inspiration: Andrew Byers. From the Carcosan Grimoire
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
111-2Ancient.
113-4Ascendant.
115-6August.
121-2Beauteous.
123-4Beautiful.
125-6Beneficent.
131-2Blooming.
133-4Blossoming.
135-6Bountiful.
141-2Bright.
143-4Brightest.
145-6Brilliant.
151-2Celestial.
153-4Clear.
155-6Constant.
161-2Coruscating.
163-4Crystalline.
165-6Cunning.
211-2Day's.
213-4Deep.
215-6Delicate.
221-2Desirous.
223-4Divine.
225-6Dominant.
231-2Eloquent.
233-4Eternal.
235-6Ever-Full.
241-2Exalted.
243-4Falling.
245-6Fertile.
251-2Final.
253-4Flowering.
255-6Foremost.
261-2Gentle.
263-4Gibbering.
265-6Glittering.
311-2Glorious.
313-4Gracious.
315-6Grand.
321-2Heart's.
323-4High.
325-6Humble.
331-2Illustrious.
333-4Imperious.
335-6Implacable.
341-2Inapproachable.
343-4Incomparable.
345-6Indulgent.
351-2Inestimable.
353-4Inexorable.
355-6Invincible.
361-2Iridescent.
363-4Lustrous.
365-6Magisterial.
411-2Magnificent.
413-4Manifest.
415-6Many-Angled.
421-2Masterful.
423-4Meek.
425-6Merciful.
431-2Mighty.
433-4Most (and roll again on this table, ignoring and re-rolling if you get this result again, or the result 'Night's').
435-6Mystic.
441-2Night's.
443-4Omnipotent.
445-6Omnipresent.
451-2Omniscient.
453-4One True.
455-6Overflowing.
461-2Pale.
463-4Paramount.
465-6Peerless.
511-2Perpetual.
513-4Piercing.
515-6Predominant.
521-2Purest.
523-4Raucous.
525-6Redoubtable.
531-2Refulgent.
533-4Regnant.
535-6Resplendent.
541-2Righteous.
543-4Royal.
545-6Sagacious.
551-2Screaming.
553-4Serene.
555-6Shimmering.
561-2Shining.
563-4Silent.
565-6Sovereign.
611-2Splendorous.
613-4Stainless.
615-6Stern.
621-2Sublime.
623-4Superior.
625-6Supreme.
631-2Swift.
633-4Total.
635-6Tranquil.
641-2Transcendent.
643-4Triumphant.
645-6Unanswerable.
651-2Unapproachable.
653-4Unbearable.
655-6Utter.
661-2Uttermost.
663-4Wise.
665-6roll on the 'Precious and Semi-Precious Stones' table, in the 'Treasure' section. Ignore the column headed 'value'.
 
 
Fantasy Titles B
source or inspiration: Andrew Byers. From the Carcosan Grimoire
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
111-2Adept.
113-4Advocate.
115-6Apotheosis.
121-2Arbiter.
123-4Attendant.
125-6Autocrat.
131-2Autocrator.
133-4Bestower.
135-6Brightness.
141-2Captain.
143-4Chief.
145-6Chieftain.
151-2Commander.
153-4Crown.
155-6Death.
161-2Dew.
163-4Diadem.
165-6Dominance.
211-2Dominator.
213-4Dominion.
215-6Elegance.
221-2Excellency.
223-4Eyes.
225-6Father/Mother.
231-2Flower.
233-4Foundation.
235-6Fountain.
241-2Fullness.
243-4Gem.
245-6Gemstone.
251-2Glory.
253-4Grace.
255-6Guardian.
261-2Heart.
263-4Illumination.
265-6Illustriousness.
311-2Infinitude.
313-4Intellect.
315-6Jewel.
321-2Joy.
323-4Joy-Giver.
325-6Judge.
331-2Lawgiver.
333-4Life.
335-6Light.
341-2Listener.
343-4Lord/Lady.
345-6Lover.
351-2Master/Mistress.
353-4Mind.
355-6Mirror.
361-2Night.
363-4Obliteration.
365-6Ocean.
411-2One.
413-4Overlord.
415-6Overseer.
421-2Pearl.
423-4Perfection.
425-6Pharaoh.
431-2Plenipotentiary.
433-4Plumage.
435-6Poignancy.
441-2Pool.
443-4Power.
445-6Preceptor.
451-2Preponderancy.
453-4Presence.
455-6Protector.
461-2Provider.
463-4Puissance.
465-6Radiance.
511-2Rain.
513-4Ravager.
515-6Ravishment.
521-2Reflection.
523-4Regent.
525-6Servant.
531-2Shield.
533-4Soul.
535-6Sovereign.
541-2Speaker.
543-4Spring.
545-6Star.
551-2Sun.
553-4Superior.
555-6Thought.
561-2Totalitor.
563-4Tower.
565-6Tyrant.
611-2Vault.
613-4Victory.
615-6Voice.
621-2Wellspring.
623-4Wielder.
625-6Will.
631-2Wind.
633-4Worm.
635-6roll on the 'Titles of a Magician' table, in the 'Magic and Religion' and 'Personalising Characters' sections.
641-2as above.
643-4as above.
645-6roll on the 'Titles of an Aristocratic Ruler' table, in the 'Settlements and Countries' section. Ignore the column headed 'Title of Territory'.
651-2as above.
653-4as above.
655-6roll on the 'Titles of a High-Ranking Priest' table, in the 'Magic and Religion' and 'Settlements and Countries' sections.
661-2as above.
663-4roll on the 'Evil Magical Creatures - Titles 1' table, in the 'Magic and Religion' and 'Creating Creatures' sections. If you get the result 'Destroyer', ignore the instruction to roll on the other table.
665-6as above.
 
 
Fantasy Titles C
source or inspiration: Andrew Byers. From the Carcosan Grimoire
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
11-21-2Beyond all Superlatives.
11-23-4by Whom All See.
11-25-6of (A) Countenance.
13-41-2of All.
13-43-4of All Excellences.
13-45-6of All Gifts.
15-61-2of All Graces.
15-63-4of All Lands.
15-65-6of All Truths.
21-21-2of Benedictions.
21-23-4of Dreams.
21-25-6of Glory.
23-41-2of Heaven.
23-43-4of Humility.
23-45-6of Invincibility.
25-61-2of Kings.
25-63-4of Many Colours.
25-65-6of Mercy.
31-21-2of Peace.
31-23-4of Radiance.
31-25-6of Sleepers.
33-41-2of Small Petals.
33-43-4of Splendour.
33-45-6of Spring.
35-61-2of Stones.
35-63-4of Sublime Wisdom.
35-65-6of Summer.
41-21-2of the (A) God.
41-23-4of the (A) Scepter.
41-25-6of the Air.
43-41-2of the Air, the Earth, and the Seas.
43-43-4of the Bringer.
43-45-6of the Dead.
45-61-2of the Earth.
45-63-4of the Eyes.
45-65-6of the Floods.
51-21-2of the Frozen Lightning.
51-23-4of the Gatherer.
51-25-6of the Hills.
53-41-2of the Master.
53-43-4of the Moon.
53-45-6of the Morning.
55-61-2of the Seas.
55-63-4of the Stars.
55-65-6of the Sun.
61-21-2of the True People.
61-23-4of the Waves.
61-25-6of Those Who Watch.
63-41-2of War.
63-43-4of Winds.
63-45-6of Winter.
65-61-2of Wishes.
65-63-4That Sees In the Dark.
65-65-6Upon the (A) Throne.
 
 
Disease 1: Frequency
source or inspiration: HackMaster
 
Characters should gain a number of 'Exposure Points' per day, depending on where they are and other factors as listed. Note that a character's Exposure Points can fall, but can never go below zero. When a character's points equal or exceed 50, the GM should roll a dice. 1-3 indicates that they've contracted a disease. Whether they do or don't, they lose 50 Exposure Points after the roll is made. If your game system has an attribute like Constitution, Stamina, Toughness etc, the GM may make a roll based on that attribute instead (eg roll 3 dice, get a disease if the number is over the character's Constitution).
 
.
EnvironmentExposure Points Gained Per Day
marsh, swamp8
mountain, arctic or desert environments0
other wilderness2
dungeons2
village4
town5
city6-8, depending on how crowded
on a ship0-8, depending on how crowded
The GM should also apply the following modifiers:
sanitationIf the characters are in a settlement or on board ship, apply a modifier of -3 to +20, depending on how good the sanitation is, with 0 indicating average sanitation (average for a medieval-style society, rather than average for the modern First World).
tropical climate+4
sub-tropical climate+2
summer+2 (except in deserts)
winter-2
If the GM knows that a disease is present+1 to +20, depending on the contagiousness of the disease. Double if the character is in close proximity to those infected (eg a doctor tending them, or adventurers travelling all day with an infected fellow adventurer).
 
 
Disease 2: Symptoms
source or inspiration: 'Dragon' magazine
 
This table gives the effects of a disease, other than loss of Stamina/Life/Hit Points.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2shortness of breath.
13-4paralysis.
15-6blindness.
21-2deafness.
23-4numbness.
25-6fever/chills.
31-2skin sores.
33-4nausea.
35-6rash.
41-2drowsiness.
43-4insanity.
45-6bleeding.
51-2hyperactivity/inability to sleep.
53-4coughing and sneezing.
55-6fatigue, loss of energy.
61-2diarrhea.
63-4hallucinations.
65-6panic attacks.
 
 
Major Events
source or inspiration: TSR version of Oriental Adventures
 
This table is designed to generate events that effect an entire country. The GM might give a 1 in 12 chance for a major event to happen each month.
Obviously some events might not be possible in some areas (for example, flood in an area with almost no rainfall).
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2An ambassador arrives from another country (roll again: on a 6, they're from a previously unknown land). Roll five dice for how many months they stay. They are mostly interested in (roll again: 1-3 diplomatic relations 4-6 swapping magic and/or technogical knowledge). The conditions they offer will be better if i) their country is weak, ii) the host country is powerful, iii) their country is a generally peaceful one, and worse if the opposite is true. Roll again: on a 1 or 2 they will want to arrange a marriage between one of their powerful families and those of the host country.
13-4An important person is assassinated (roll again: 1-3 because of their position, 4-6 because of personal reasons). The assassin is (roll again: 1-2 taken alive 3 killed during the assassination 4 kills themselves immediately after the assasination 5-6 not caught). Roll again: on a 1 there is no clear successor and a power struggle ensues: roll 1 dice for how many months it lasts. It has a 1 in 6 chance of leading to civil war (see below).
15-6An important person dies (roll again: 1-2 of old age, 3-4 of illness, 5-6 by accident). Roll again: on a 1 there is no clear successor and a power struggle ensues: roll 1 dice for how many months it lasts. It has a 1 in 6 chance of leading to civil war (see below).
21-2as above.
23-4A comet is seen in the sky, indicating great events in the future. The GM should triple the chances of an event happening for this month and the next eleven. They should roll for events for the next year immediately. For each event, roll again: on a 1-3, the event can be predicted in broad detail.
25-6Earthquake strikes (roll again: 1-5 a major city 6 the entire land). For each major city effected, roll again: on a 1 to 4 there is a major fire (see below). Then make another roll for each city effected: on a 1 or 2 there is a plague (see below), if there isn't one already.
31-2Famine strikes the land. Roll one dice and add 1 for how many months it lasts. The cost of food will increase, up to 100 times its normal price. Normally law-abiding folk will turn to crime in desperation. Farms will produce no income for a year, and only one quarter of their income for the next year. The population will reduce by 5% each month. There is a 1 in 6 chance of a plague (see below). There is a 4 in 6 chance of a civil war (see below), unless the government acts effectively to relive the suffering.
33-4Major fire. Roll one dice, add 3, then multiply by 10. This is the percentage of the city that is destroyed (it should be 40 to 90%). The city's population is reduced by the same dice roll, minus one, times 5 (0 to 30%). There is a 1 in 2 chance of a plague occuring if one isn't already (see below). The price of building materials is 10 times normal for the next 4 months. The price of food doubles for one month. All these effects assume buildings are mostly made of wood, and that there's no effective fire brigade. If either of these aren't true, the effects can be much less, or the GM might even rule that a major fire can't occur.
35-6Major floods. The population of the land as a whole will not change much, but people will move from the effected area (near coasts or major rivers) to safer places, causing economic upheaval. The price of all goods will be doubled for 1-6 months. If the flood strikes during the planting season, income from farms in the area will be halved for one year. If it strikes during the harvest season, 80% of farm income is lost and there is a 2 in 6 chance of a famine (see above). Planting and harvest season might each last for one quarter of the year. Starting in the next 1-3 months, unless there's one already and unless the government takes effective steps to stop it. In addition, floods have a 1 in 6 chance of causing a plague (see below), if there isn't one already.
41-2A major influx of refugees arrive from a neighbouring country. If there is currently a plague, famine, or similar trouble, there is a 3 in 6 chance that they will be blamed for it, leading to further trouble and violence. There is a 1 in 6 chance that their religion will gain many followers in the country (see below).
43-4A new religion gains many converts. Optionally, roll again to see how overt the conflict is between it and the established religions: on a 5, there is ocassional, spontaneous outbreaks of violence. On a 6 there is frequent, organised violence. Frequent, organised violence has a 1 in 6 chance of leading to civil war (see below). However, all these chances should be modified by the nature of the new and old religions: firstly whether they're peaceful or warlike, and secondly whether they tend to compete with other religions or blend with them. In addition, events such as plague and famine will tend to make the conflict more violent. There is a 1 in 3 chance that there will also be signs of the gods (see below). If so, roll again: 1-2 the new gods, 3-4 the old ones, 5-6 both.
45-6Plague strikes the land. Roll 2 dice for how many months it lasts. The population of the area is reduced by 5% each month. While the plague lasts, the cost of imported goods will be 5 times normal, and the price of all other goods will be doubled, as traders refuse to enter the area.
51-2A political plot is discovered. Roll again: on a 1 or 2, the 'discovery' is false. In any case, many officials are banished, fired, or even killed. The turmoil lasts for 1-3 months. There is a 1 in 6 chance that it will lead to outright civil war (see below).
53-4Civil war. Roll 1 dice for how many months it lasts. What it's about and its chance of success aren't possible to put on a table, because they will vary so widely depending on the country.
55-6Signs of the gods. A god is said to have appeared somewhere in the country. The chance of this being true depends on the role of the gods in the game world. The site of its appearance will become a focus for worship. This may mean that a temple is built there, that pilgrims come, and so on. It might also mean that followers of other gods leave, or are driven away (depending on the nature of the god).
61-2Explorers return with news of a new land. There is a 3 in 6 chance that it will be inhabited, in which case there is a 4 in 6 chance that an ambassador will arrive with the explorers (see above, but there's no need to roll to see whether they come from a previously unknown land).
63-4For this month, many important people will neglect their duties in order to compete for the affections of a noted, unmarried person. There is a 3 in 6 chance that the person will be a prostitute. If duelling exists in the country, duels will indeed be fought. This has a 2 in 6 chance of leading to the death of an important person (see above, but don't roll for how they died).
65-6as above.
 
 
Strange Customs 1
source or inspiration: Snorri. From the Carcosan Grimoire
 
All the Strange Customs tables are intended to be used at once. String the results together in order to get a strange custom for a village or area.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Everyone
2The old people
3Men
4Women
5The priest, priestess, magician or wise woman
6The best warrior
 
 
Strange Customs 2
source or inspiration: Snorri. From the Carcosan Grimoire
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3must eat
14-6must worship
21-3must sacrifice
24-6must completely ignore
31-3must act as if they hate
34-6must avoid
41-3must mummify
44-6must act as if they love
51-3must burn
54-6must drown
61-3must bury
64-6must obey
 
 
Strange Customs 3
source or inspiration: Snorri. From the Carcosan Grimoire
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3women.
14-6men.
21-3people older than themselves.
24-6people younger than themselves.
31-3strangers.
34-6children.
41-3trees.
44-6insects.
51-3rocks.
54-6snakes.
61-3plants.
64-6animals.
 
 
Strange Living Quarters 1
source or inspiration: Snorri. From the Carcosan Grimoire
 
These three tables are intended to be used together.
String the results together in the form (1)(live/s in, are kept in)(2)(3) - for example "Corpses are kept in brightly-painted tents."
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Everyone
14-6The old people
21-3Men
24-6Women
31-3The priest, priestess, magician or wise woman
34-6The best warrior
41-3Slaves or criminals (depending on how evil the place is)
44-6Children
51-3The ruler
54-6Foreigners
61-3Corpses
64-6Animals
 
 
Strange Living Quarters 2
source or inspiration: Snorri. From the Carcosan Grimoire
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3underground
14-6floating
21-3human-shaped
24-6locked
31-3secret
34-6spherical
41-3cramped
44-6living
51-3huge
54-6wooden
61-3metal
64-6roll on the 'Precious and Semi-Precious Stones' table in the 'Treasure' section.
 
 
Strange Living Quarters 3
source or inspiration: Snorri. From the Carcosan Grimoire
 
Roll 1 dice.
1temple/s.
2cave/s.
3tower/s.
4caravan/s.
5pit/s.
6tent/s.
 
 
Burglaries
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table generates what security will be present in a house that the characters break into.

Usually the GM will roll only once on this table. In unusually rich or poor areas, roll twice. In areas where rich and poor live close together, roll three times for rich people's houses and twice for everyone else. Getting the same result (other than 'nothing') more than once means, for example, an unusually difficult lock, unusually vicious or perceptive guard dogs, and so on.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Nothing.
14-6Nothing.
21-3Locks.
24-6Traps (optionally roll again: on a 6 the traps will be magical. In wizards' houses the traps will be magical without having to roll)(optionally roll again: 1-3 the entrances to the house have traps 4-6 valuables have traps).
31-3Guard or guards (optionally roll 1 dice for how many)(optionally roll again: 1-3 animals 4-6 humans, or another intelligent species if your campaign world has them).
34-6The occupants are unusually light sleepers.
41-3The occupants are armed, with hand-to-hand weapons.
44-6The occupants are armed, with ranged weapons.
51-3Valuables are unusually well-hidden (optionally roll again: on a 6 the valuables will be magically hidden. In wizards' houses the valuables will be magically hidden without having to roll).
54-6Valuables are cursed.
61-3Valuables are very distinctive, making them difficult to sell.
64-6Valuables are unusually difficult to move (for example there's no gold, but plenty of statues).
 
 
Diplomacy
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table generates the relations between two groups. It can be used for tribes, groups of creatures in a dungeon, factions in a city and so on.

The two 'Conflict' tables, in the 'Adventure Ideas' section, give more detailed results for a single conflict.
Those tables are more designed to come up with an adventure idea quickly, whereas this table is more designed for 'world-building'.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1At war If the two groups come into contact, they'll fight each other or run. If the player characters are perceived as being allied with one group by the other, they'll have a severe penalty on any attempts to make friends. If the delvers present evidence that they've attacked one of the groups to the other, they'll have a bonus on such attempts.
2Hostile If the two groups come into contact, they'll often end up fighting each other. They certainly won't allow the other group to pass through their territory. If the delvers are perceived as being allied with one group by the other, they'll have a penalty on any attempts to make friends. This penalty will be less than if the groups were at war. If the player characters are being persecuted by one group, the other will usually shelter them, if only out of spite.
3Allied The two groups are quite friendly. They'll at least listen to the other group's opinion and discuss with them if possible, when deciding what to do with the player characters. If the player characters are perceived as being hostile to one group, they'll have a severe penalty on any attempt to make friends with the other.
4Strongly Allied The two groups will regard an attack on the other as an attack on them. They'll usually respect the decision of the other group in regard to how to treat the player characters.
5Wary The two groups would like to destroy each other, but fear the results of open conflict. If the delvers are perceived as being allied with one groups by the other, they'll have a penalty on any attempt to make friends. This penalty will be about the same as if the groups were hostile. The two groups are likely to help the player characters with any plan which will weaken the other group, but only if they can do so in a way that allows them to deny involvement.
6No Contact The two groups have no resource that they both want, and no way to beneficially work together. They're thus neither allied nor opposed. Re-roll this result if you want every group to be involved in a conflict.
 
 
Consequences of Drunkenness
source or inspiration: Chaotic Shiny's 'Tavern Tables'
 
The GM should decide on the chance of rolling on this table, based on the amount consumed and the toughness of the drinker. The effects of this table are in addition to being hung over.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Roll on the 'Gambling' table below. The character risks all the money they have with them.
13-4The character has no money, and can't remember where it went.
15-6The character only has half the money they should have, and can't remember where the rest went.
21-2The character wakes up naked.
23-4The character has lost an important item, even if they didn't take it out with them. It must be one that they could have gotten access to during the night. If there is no such item, roll again.
25-6The character has made an expensive and largely useless purchase.
31-2The character is wounded, having been in a fist-fight.
33-4The character has a new tattoo.
35-6The character has a new enemy.
41-2The character has let slip some information that they should have kept secret.
43-4The character wakes up in jail, having committed a minor offense.
45-6The character wakes up far from the town or city they were in. It must be a distance they could have travelled during the night, but remember that magic might allow travel over great distances.
51-2The character has joined a cult that is unlikely to let them leave easily.
53-4The character has joined an army (including possibly a rebel army).
55-6The character killed someone. Roll again: 1-2 accident 3-4 self-defence 5-6 the character's fault. Optionally alter these chances based on how good or evil the character is.
61-2The character has gotten married.
63-4The character has arranged to fight a duel.
65-6The character has bought a 'magic' item. Roll again 1-2 isn't magic 3-4 is magic but doesn't work properly 5-6 is magic, but doesn't do what it's supposed to.
 
 
Gambling
source or inspiration: Chaosium's book 'Cities'
 
One roll on this table is intended to cover an entire session of gambling.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3The characters lose their bet, and are accused of cheating. Roll one dice and add 1. They must leave town for this many weeks, or face a high chance of having to roll on 'Consequences of Unpaid Debt' below..
14-6The characters lose double what they bet. If they can't pay this amount, roll 1 dice and subtract 1. If the result is over 0, they must leave town for this many weeks, or face a high chance of having to roll on 'Consequences of Unpaid Debt' below.
21-3as above.
24-6The characters lose half their bet.
31-3as above.
34-6as above.
41-3The characters break even.
44-6The characters win an amount equal to half their bet (for example if they bet 100 gold pieces, they end up with 150).
51-3The characters win an amount equal to their bet.
54-6The characters win an amount equal to twice what they bet.
61-3The characters win an amount equal to three times what they bet. There is a chance that they'll be accused of cheating. If they are, they can either walk away (treat as breaking even), or take their winnings. If they take their winnings, roll one dice and add 1. They must leave town for this many weeks, or face a high chance of having to roll on 'Consequences of Unpaid Debt' below..
64-6The characters win an amount equal to three times what they bet. However, they gain a reputation as skilled gamblers, such that no one in the area will let them bet. The amount of time this effect lasts depends on the size of their winnings: it might be only for a few weeks, or it might be for years.
 
 
Consequences of Unpaid Debt
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Results marked with a (+) will only happen if the debt is owed to someone who is willing and able to use criminal means to recover their money. This doesn't necessarily mean that they themselves have to be criminals. Some people will sell the debt to criminals, or hire them - especially if they're not able to use the law. Some people might be prepared to use some of these methods, but not others.

Results marked with a (-) will only happen if the debt is owed to someone who is able to use legal means to recover their money. Some criminals might be unable or unwilling to use these methods. However in more corrupt areas, or with more 'respectable' criminals, they may. On the other hand, in some places honest but poor people might not be able to use these methods.

Also note that most people will give the characters extra time to pay, in return for increasing the amount of debt. They will only use the options on this table when they conclude that they're never going to get their money.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3(+) The characters will be attacked by thugs who will try to beat them.
14-6The characters will find that shopkeepers will be likely to refuse to serve them, inns will be likely to refuse them a room, and so on.
21-3as above.
24-6The characters will be offered the option of doing an unpleasant and time-consuming, but not illegal, job to clear their debt. If they refuse, the result depends on whether the offer is 'unofficial' or made by the local law. If it's unofficial, roll again on this table, re-rolling if you get this result again. If it's official, the characters are likely to be arrested and kept in jail for a period of time that depends on the size of their debt.
31-3(+) The characters will be offered the option of doing a dangerous and illegal task to clear their debt. If they refuse, roll again on this table, re-rolling if you get this result again.
34-6(+) Thieves will rob the characters, trying to take enough goods to clear the debt. If the thieves are driven off, or they don't get enough goods, roll again on this table, re-rolling if you get this result again.
41-3(-) The characters will be visited by magistrates working for the government, who will seize goods to sell to clear the debt. Driving off the magistrates will be a criminal act and expose the characters to other consequences. If the goods don't cover the debt, roll again on this table, re-rolling if you get this result again, or thieves.
44-6as above.
51-3(-) The characters will be arrested, and stay in jail for a period of time that depends on the amount of their debt. Re-roll if the debt is a result of criminal activity, illegal gambling etc.
54-6(-) as above.
61-3(possibly +) A witch, evil sorcerer etc will be hired to curse the characters. Although this might not be criminal, many people will refuse to use this method. In this case roll again.
64-6(+) The characters will be attacked by assassins who will try to kill them.
 
 
Who Owns Yonder Castle?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table doesn't roll for different species, since that will differ strongly from one game world to the next.
The GM might come up with a chance of the owner being non-human, and roll that seperately to the roll on this table.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3A (roll again: 1-2 commoner 3-4 barbarian 5-6 mysterious individual who appeared one day), who was given a title, and the lands and castle, as a reward for their heroism.
14-6An order of priests who (roll again: 1 are never seen - people arrive, but they never venture out 2 oppress the people with their fanaticism 3 are charitable and kind 4 don't take their vows very seriously 5 cause strange lights with their study of magic 6 mostly keep themselves to themselves).
21-3A dragon.
24-6An evil wizard (roll again: 1-2 is also a noble, 3-4 has bewitched the rightful owner of the castle 5 bought it with their seemingly endless wealth, whereof no-one knows the source 6 created the castle with their magic).
31-3A benign wizard (roll again as above, but 3-4 becomes 'was given it in gratitude by the former owner').
34-6No-one but the ghosts (roll again: 1-2 the castle is really haunted 3-4 it's abandoned 5 Scooby-Doo style, an evil wizard is creating the impression that it's haunted 6 it was abandoned, but travellers now make use of it).
41-3We don't have a lord. We're an anarcho-syndicalist collective.
44-6Strangely enough, an actual feudal lord (or lady).
51-3As above, but they're unusually brutal and oppressive (roll again: on a 1 or 2, they're really a vampire).
54-6As for (4, 4-6), but they're unusually mild and just.
61-3As for (4, 4-6), but they're unusually brave and fanatical (roll again: on a 1, they're really a robot).
64-6As for (4, 4-6), but they're unusually decadent and corrupt (roll again: on a 1 or 2 they're really a vampire).
 
 
City Encounters: Day
source or inspiration: Basic Fantasy and Dungeons and Digressions
 
Roll 2 dice, use the total.
2Doppelganger: An inhuman creature who can take on the form of any person they've met.
3Noble: accompanied by at least 1 adult servant. Nobles may offer jobs to the heroes, or on the contrary if the characters have a bad reputation they may be ordered to leave town or even arrested. Nobles will be much more likely to ride than other characters.
4Roll again.
1-4 Thief or Thieves: roll 1 dice for how many. They will, obviously, attempt to appear to be something other than thieves: usually ordinary townsfolk, or sometimes beggars.
5 Roadside Gambling Game. Open to all. Roll again: On a 1-3 those hosting it are cheating.
6 Thieves' Market. All sorts of goods are available at about 30% cheaper than their normal price. However if the heroes stay, the GM should roll to see what happens: 1 suspected of being an informant or undercover guardsman 2 other customers attempt to steal from the heroes 3 the city guards raid the place and attempt to arrest everyone, including the heroes 4-6 no bad result.
5Thug or Thugs: roll 2 dice and subtract 2 for how many (obviously re-roll if the result is zero). Thugs will usually be armed, but will tend to conceal their weapons.
6City Guards: roll 2 dice for how many. They will often confront any 'suspicious-looking' characters. Whether the player characters count as 'suspicious-looking' will depend on the area. Roll again: on a 6, they conscript the heroes, and anyone else around, to help fight a fire.
7Merchant or Merchants: roll 1 dice. On a 1-3 there will be only 1 merchant. On a 4-6, roll again for how many. They have a 50% chance of being accompanied by (usually hired) warriors. Roll 1 dice for how many. Optionally, roll on the 'Merchants' subtable below.
8Roll again.
1-5 Beggar or Beggars. Roll 2 dice and subtract 2 for how many (obviously re-roll if the result is zero). Also roll 2 dice for their intentions; on a total of 2 or 4 (but not a 3), they're prepared to steal from those who refuse to give.
6 A huge crowd of beggars is rioting. The city guards will turn up in 10 minutes to an hour (1 dice x 10 minutes).
9Priest: Roll 1 dice and subtract 1. The priest will be accompanied by that many devout, but not priestly, companions OR roll on the 'Priests' subtable below.
10Mercenaries: Roll 2 dice for how many. Optionally, roll on the 'Mercenaries' subtable below.
11Wizard: roll 1 dice, and subtract 2 (count negative results as zero). The wizard will be accompanied by that many apprentices.
12Roll again.
1-3 Were-rats: were-rats can appear in human form, or the form of a giant rat. Depending on your game world, they may have been born human and been cursed by the bite of another were-rat, or they may be an actual species. Similarly, they may have the power to change their form at will, or it may be involuntary - for example, linked to phases of the moon. In human form they may appear 'rat-like', with darting eyes, a tendency to twitch their noses when under stress, and in the case of males a tendency towards long, thin mustaches. They may live in human- or rat-like conditions. Were-rats will generally not attack a group which is larger than them. Roll 1 dice and add 1 for how many wererats in a group. In their nests or homes, roll 2 dice and add 2.
4 An animal has escaped from the city zoo.
5 As above, but it's escaped from the gardens of an eccentric noble.
6 As above, but it's escaped from the laboratory of a wizard, and is (roll again: 1-2 the strange result of an experiment 3-4 a minor demon 5-6 a creature from another dimension).
 
 
City Encounters: Night
source or inspiration: Basic Fantasy and Dungeons and Digressions
 
Roll 2 dice, use the total.
2Doppelganger: An inhuman creature who can take on the form of any person they've met.
3Shadow: a living creature that appears to be made of shadow (but is solid and three-dimensional, although weightless). Roll 1 dice and add 2 for how many. Shadows generally lie in wait in dark places, waiting for prey to happen by. Their touch is intensely cold. Anyone killed by a shadow is likely to rise from the dead as a shadow themselves.
4Press Gang: A group of kidnappers, working for the local government, who conscript their victims into the army or navy. Roll 2 dice for how many there are in a group. They will usually not attack a larger group unless it's obviously drunk, weakened etc. They will often fight with their bare hands, or blunt weapons like clubs, but at least some are likely to carry daggers or swords in case they misjudge their victims and end up in a serious battle.
5Roll again.
1-5 Beggar or Beggars. Roll 2 dice and subtract 2 for how many (obviously re-roll if the result is zero). Also roll 2 dice for their intentions; on a 2 or 4 (but not a 3), they are prepared to steal from those who refuse to give.
6 A huge crowd of beggars is rioting. The city guards will turn up in 10 minutes to an hour (1 dice x 10 minutes).
6Roll again.
1-4 Thief or Thieves: roll 1 dice for how many. They will, obviously, attempt to appear to be something other than thieves: usually ordinary townsfolk, or sometimes beggars.
5 Roadside Gambling Game. Open to all. Roll again: On a 1-3 those hosting it are cheating.
6 Thieves' Market. All sorts of goods are available at about 30% cheaper than their normal price. However if the heroes stay, the GM should roll to see what happens: 1 suspected of being an informant or undercover guardsman 2 other customers attempt to steal from the heroes 3 the city guards raid the place and attempt to arrest everyone, including the heroes 4-6 no bad result.
7Thug or Thugs: roll 2 dice and subtract 2 for how many (obviously re-roll if the result is zero). Thugs will usually be armed, but will tend to conceal their weapons.
8Merchant or Merchants: roll 1 dice. On a 1-3 there will be only 1 merchant. On a 4-6, roll again for how many. They have a 50% chance of being accompanied by (usually hired) warriors. Roll 1 dice for how many. Optionally, roll on the 'Merchants' subtable below.
9Giant Rats: roll 3 dice for how many. Add 2 to the result if they're encountered in their nest. The bite of a giant rat can cause disease as well as wound.
10City Guards: roll 2 dice for how many. They will often confront any 'suspicious-looking' characters. Whether the player characters count as 'suspicious-looking' will depend on the area. Roll again: on a 6, they conscript the heroes, and anyone else around, to help fight a fire.
11Wizard: roll 1 dice, and subtract 2 (count negative results as zero). The wizard will be accompanied by that many apprentices.
12Roll again.
1-3 Were-rats: were-rats can appear in human form, or the form of a giant rat. Depending on your game world, they may have been born human and been cursed by the bite of another were-rat, or they may be an actual species. Similarly, they may have the power to change their form at will, or it may be involuntary - for example, linked to phases of the moon. In human form they may appear 'rat-like', with darting eyes, a tendency to twitch their noses when under stress, and in the case of males a tendency towards long, thin mustaches. They may live in human- or rat-like conditions. Were-rats will generally not attack a group which is larger than them. Roll 1 dice and add 1 for how many wererats in a group. In their nests or homes, roll 2 dice and add 2.
4 An animal has escaped from the city zoo.
5 As above, but it's escaped from the gardens of an eccentric noble.
6 As above, but it's escaped from the laboratory of a wizard, and is (roll again: 1-2 the strange result of an experiment 3-4 a minor demon 5-6 a creature from another dimension).
 
 
City Encounters: Sewers, table 1
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Nothing This part of the sewer system no longer carries anything.
2Storm Water Depending on the weather above ground, there might be a chance of flash floods.
3Sewerage The players will be far less effective, due to their revulsion for their surroundings. If an encounter with humans (or similar creatures) is rolled on the table below, there is a 50% chance that the players meet no-one instead.
4as above.
5Alchemical Waste For every hour that the players spend in this environment, they have a 1 in 6 chance of suffering some ill effect. If they do, they should roll on the 'Gas Clouds' table in the 'Dungeons and Combat' section (treat as if they 'failed to resist its effects' if relevant). If they actually wade in the waste, they have this chance for every 15 minutes. If an encounter with humans (or similar creatures) is rolled on the table below, the characters meet no-one instead.
6Magical Waste As above, but instead of suffering effects as of a gas cloud, the characters risk suffering the effects of a randomly-chosen spell: if the chosen spell is beneficial, nothing happens.
 
 
City Encounters: Sewers, table 2
source or inspiration: The Hobgoblin's Tavern
 
Roll 3 dice.
1st dice2nd dice3rd diceresult
11-31-3A city guard. Roll again: 1-3 they're alone 4-5 there's another guard within shouting distance 6 there are 1-6 other guards within shouting distance. They're likely to have been sent down here as punishment.
11-34-6A specially-trained patrol of the city guard. Roll 1 dice for how many, counting a 1 as 2. They are likely to have 'thief'-type skills at a higher level than ordinary guards.
14-61-3A sewer worker, going about their job.
14-64-61-6 sewer workers, clearing a blockage.
21-31-3Illegal gladiatoral games (roll again: 1-3 involving animals 4-6 involving humans or other intelligent creatures).
21-34-6A giant slug.
24-61-3A lone thief (roll again: 1-2 going to a job 3-4 returning from a job 5-6 smuggling goods).
24-64-6A group of thieves. Roll 2 dice for how many (roll again: 1-2 going to a job 3-4 returning from a job 5 smuggling goods 6 about to murder one of their number).
31-31-3A pack of rats. Roll 6 dice for how many. The main danger from rats is catching a disease from their bites.
31-34-6A crocodile - descended from unwanted pets thrown into the sewers.
34-61-31-6 wild dogs (who may carry disease).
34-64-61-6 wild cats (who may carry disease).
41-31-3A giant spider, in its web. There is a 50% chance that the web will block the entire tunnel. Its web is sticky enough that it might entrap adventurers. It will burn fairly easily.
41-34-6A giant rat.
44-61-3A giant centipede.
44-64-6A water spirit (only encountered in storm water or sewerage. In sewerage, roll again: 1-5 evil due to the contaminated water 6 it bravely maintains a small area of pure water).
51-31-3Bats. Roll 3 dice for how many.
51-34-6Lurker Under the Surface. An octopus-like monster. It will flee from light.
54-61-3A corpse - human, or another intelligent species.
54-64-6A hole in the sewer wall (roll again: 1-3 made by thieves 4-6 made by the inhabitants of a dungeon).
61-31-3A cache of goods, hidden by thieves.
61-34-6The meeting-place of an evil cult (roll again: someone will be there on a 6).
64-61-3Were-rats' Nest: were-rats can appear in human form, or the form of a giant rat. Depending on your game world, they may have been born human and been cursed by the bite of another were-rat, or they may be an actual species. Similarly, they may have the power to change their form at will, or it may be involuntary - for example, linked to phases of the moon. In human form they may appear 'rat-like', with darting eyes, a tendency to twitch their noses when under stress, and in the case of males a tendency towards long, thin mustaches. They may live in human- or rat-like conditions. Were-rats will generally not attack a group which is larger than them. Roll 2 dice and add 2 for how many wererats are present..
64-64-6as above.
 
 
City Encounters subtable: Mercenaries
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
The GM might want to roll 2 dice to see how many mercenaries are in a group.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1They're drunk and looking for a fight.
2They're solemnly mourning dead companions (roll again: on a 1-4 they're drunk).
3One of them recognises one of the player characters (roll again: 1-2 as a friend 3-4 as an enemy 5 as a rival 6 as the person they're on a mission to capture) (roll again: 1-3 mistakenly 4-6 correctly).
4They're recruiting. They might accept the player characters, or even actively seek them out.
5They're looking for work. If the player characters are obviously adventurers, the mercenaries will ask them if they're hiring or know of any work.
6Two groups of mercenaries (roll for numbers for both groups) start fighting in the street (roll again: 1-2 the two groups fought on opposite sides in a recent war 3-4 they've fallen out over money 5-6 they've simply gotten into a drunken fight).
 
 
City Encounters subtable: Merchants
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
The GM might want to roll to see how many merchants there are. On a 1-3 there will be only 1 merchant. On a 4-6, roll 1 dice for how many.
In either case, they have a 50% chance of being accompanied by (usually hired) warriors. Roll 1 dice for how many.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1The player characters witness a merchant bribing a city guard.
2The player characters witness a thief stealing from a merchant.
3The merchant/s are arguing with a group of city guards. The guards are accusing the merchant/s of some crime.
4As above, but the merchant/s are accusing the city guard.
5The merchant/s need more guards. They might accept the player characters, or even actively seek them out. If they already have guards, roll again. On a 1-3, the existing guards will resent the newcomers.
6A merchant recognises one of the player characters (roll again: 1 as a friend 2 as an ex-employee 3 as an enemy 4 as the ex-employee of an enemy 5 as a rival 6 as the ex-employee of a rival) (roll again: 1-3 mistakenly 4-6 correctly).
 
 
City Encounters subtable: Priests
source or inspiration: Dungeons and Digressions
 
Roll 1 dice.
1A respectable priest seeks the help of someone like the heroes. Roll one dice and subtract one. They are accompanied by this many devout, but not priestly, followers.
2A belligerent priest, with 2 dice worth of devout, but not priestly followers, seeks 'donations' from passers-by.
3A ragged prophet seeks to incite a crowd to riot.
4A huge funeral procession. Roll again: on a 1-2 they're angry and looking for a fight.
5A riotous religious festival, with drunkenness and thievery abounding.
6An execution: 50% chance of being legal. The condemned is (roll again: 1-3 innocent 4 guilty 5 guilty, but had a good reason 6 guilty, but manipulated or tricked into it by another).
 
 
Titles of an Aristocratic Ruler
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Dictatorial rulers may have religious or military titles as well as, or instead of, the aristocratic titles here.

Areas may have names which are based on their past rather than their present situation. For example, a county might no longer have a count.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceTitle if MaleTitle if FemaleTitle of Territory
11-4KingQueenKingdom
15-6ViceroyVicereineViceroyalty [note: a Viceroy or Vicereine is a royal official who runs a country or province in the name of and as representative of a monarch. However many such may be independent in practice, or have gained independence but kept the title]
21-2EmperorEmpressEmpire
23-4DukeDuchessDuchy
25-6Grand DukeGrand DuchessGrand Duchy
31-2BaronBaronessBarony
33-4PrincePrincessRoll again: 1-3 Principality 4-6 Princely State
35-6MarquisMarquiseroll again: 1-2 Marquessate 3-4 Margraviate 5-6 March
41-2CountCountessCounty
43-4Caliph [this is also a religious title - roll again if necessary]none - roll againCaliphate
45-6SultanSultanaSultanate
51-3Emir [this is also a military title - roll again if necessary]none - roll againEmirate
54-6SheikhSheikhahSheikdom
61-2Khanroll again: 1-2 Khatun 3-4 Khatan 5-6 KhanumKhanate
63-4roll again: 1-3 Rajah 4-6 Maharajahroll again: 1-3 Rani 4-6 MaharaniRajahdom (never Maharajadom)
 
 
Nicknames of a Ruler
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
These names are used with the ruler's name - for example 'Harald Barelegs' rather than just 'Barelegs'.

These names are often given after a ruler's death. A ruler may have one such name during their life, and another after their death.

The nickname will reflect beliefs about the ruler, but not necessarily the truth.

In all cases, feel free to re-roll if the title doesn't fit your ideas about the ruler (or just pick the most appropriate from the list).
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Barelegs.
12Bluetooth.
13Forkbeard (re-roll for female rulers).
14Harefoot.
15Ironside.
16Lackland.
21Longshanks.
22the Blessed.
23the Bloody.
24the Boneless (usually means that the ruler was born with a disability).
25the Child.
26the Confessor (implies that the ruler is highly revered within a particular ideology, especially a religion, but didn't die for that cause).
31the Conquerer.
32the Elder (implies that there was another ruler with the same name, who was styled 'the Younger').
33the Fair.
34the Far-Travelled.
35the Good.
36the Great.
41the Harelipped.
42the Just.
43the Lame.
44the Liberator.
45the Lionheart.
46the Lisp.
51the Lucky.
52the Magnificent.
53the Martyr (implies that the ruler died for a cause, especially a religion).
54the Old.
55roll again: 1-2 the Peaceful 3-4 the Peaceable 5-6 the Peace-Maker.
56the Red (ie red-haired).
61the Tall.
62the Terrible (in the sense of 'brutal', not 'incompetent').
63the Treasurer.
64the Unready.
65the Victorious.
66the Younger (implies that there was another ruler with the same name, who was styled 'the Elder').
 
 
Titles of a High-Ranking Priest
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
If only one title is listed, use it for both men and women. If two, the first is used for men and the second for women.

Those who hold these titles may have political power in the wider world as well as within their church.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Patriarch / Matriarch.
14-6High Priest / High Priestess.
21-3Chief Rabbi.
24-6Archbishop.
31-3Pontifex Maximus.
34-6Abbott / Abbess.
41-3Hegumen / Hegumenia.
44-6Imam.
51-3Mullah.
54-6roll again: 1-3 Mufti 4-6 Grand Mufti.
61-3Lama.
64-6Guru.
 
 
Shield Designs
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table can also be used for flags.
Roll for the design, then roll for the two colours (or one colour in the case of the last design) on the 'Colours' table below (if the same colour is rolled twice, re-roll the second one).
To see if the shield has an emblem, roll again: 1-3 yes (roll on the Emblems table below) 4-6 no.

Thanks to Wikipedia for the shield pictures.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2
13-4
15-6
21-2
23-4
25-6
31-2
33-4
35-6
41-2
43-4
45-6
51-2
53-4
55-6
61-2
63-4
65-6
 
 
Colours
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
In European heraldry, colours distinguished different groups. For example, a lion on a red background would represent a different family to a lion on a white background.
In Japanese heraldry, only the emblem mattered - it could appear on any colour.

This table doesn't take account of the rules of European heraldry relating to which colours could be placed next to each other.

The GM may roll only once, for the background colour to be used on flags, shields etc, and assume that the emblem is black or white. Or they may roll twice, re-rolling if they get the same result, with the first result being the background colour and the second being the emblem colour
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3red.
14-6orange.
21-3yellow.
24-6light green.
31-3dark green.
34-6light blue.
41-3dark blue.
44-6purple.
51-3black.
54-6white.
61-3grey.
64-6brown.
 
 
Emblems
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
For coats of arms, emblems of a city, tribal totems and so on.

Obviously this table should be modified in the case of animals which don't exist in your game world.

Optionally, the GM may roll to see how the emblem is coloured: 1-3 the item is coloured 'proper'; that is, it's coloured like a real example of whatever it is (for example a tree might have green leaves and brown bark) 4-6 roll on the Colours table above, re-rolling if the emblem appears on a flag or shield and the colour rolled for the emblem is the same as a colour on the flag or shield.

In real life, tribal totems were always animals. If rolling for a tribal totem, the GM may want to re-roll if the result is an object.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11flower.
12castle.
13eagle (roll again: 1 head only, facing left 2 head only, facing right 3-4 whole body, 'standing' with wings outspread, head facing left, 5-6 as for 3-4, but head facing right).
14lion (roll again on Table B below).
15dragon (roll again on Table B below).
16bull (roll again on Table B below).
21cow (roll again on table B below, but cows are always on all fours, never 'rampant').
22man (roll again 1-2 nude, 3-4 clothed, 5-6 armoured, and roll on Table B below. A 'head only' which is 'clothed' is wearing a hat).
23woman (roll again as above).
24jaguar (roll again on Table B below).
25crocodile (roll again on Table B below).
26bear (roll again on Table B below).
31sun (roll again: 1-3 full sun 4-6 rising sun)(roll again: 1-3 with a human face 4-6 without)(roll again: 1-3 with rays 4-6 without).
32moon (roll again: 1-3 full moon 4-6 crescent moon)(roll again: 1-3 with a human face 4-6 without).
33star.
34doe (a deer, a female deer) (roll again on Table B below).
35hart ie a male deer (roll again on Table B below).
36crane (roll again on Table B below).
41horse (roll again on Table B below, and if the horse is coloured 'proper', optionally roll on the Horse Colour table).
42crown.
43sword.
44eye.
45wheatsheaf.
46coin.
51tree (roll again 1-2 bare of leaves, 3-4 with leaves 5-6 with leaves and bearing fruit).
52butterfly, whole body, facing the viewer.
53leaf.
54set of scales.
55peacock, whole body, facing the viewer.
56mountain.
61roll again: 1-3 fish, whole body 4-6 dolphin, whole body. For either, roll again: 1-3 facing left 4-6 facing right.
62fan.
63hand (roll again 1-3 bare 4-6 gloved).
64roll again: 1-3 crab, 4-6 scarab beetle. In either case it's the whole body, seen from above.
65Roll again ignoring this result or the one below - but the emblem is two of whatever the result is, side by side (if you have to make extra rolls the results will be for the one on the left, and the one on the right will be a mirror image).
66Roll again ignoring this result or the one above - but the emblem is three of whatever the result is, arranged in a vertical line (make any further rolls as directed - the results will apply to all three).
 
 
Emblems Table B
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll on this table if directed to on the one above.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Head only, facing left.
2Head only, facing right.
3Head only, facing towards the viewer.
4Whole body, facing left (roll again: 1-3 on all fours, 4-6 'rampant' ie on its hind legs).
5Whole body, facing right (roll again as above).
6Whole body, facing towards the viewer (roll again as above).
 
 
Languages 1: Letters
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Most characters (in the sense of 'letters') represent a word. They may also be used to represent syllables to spell words which have no character of their own. Characters are recognisable, even to people who don't read the language, as pictures of the word they represent. Example - Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics.
2As above, except that the characters aren't recognisable as pictures of the word they represent. The characters may once have been recognisable, and have become more abstract over time.
3Characters represent syllables. For example, 'basic' would be written with two characters ('bay','sick').
4As above.
5Characters mostly represent phonemes (basic sounds), but only consonants are represented (ie not a, e, i, o or u). For example, 'basic' would be written with three characters ('b', 's', 'c'). 'sick', 'sack' and 'sock' would all be written the same way.
6As above, but both vowels and consonants are represented. English and other European languages work this way.
 
 
Languages 2: Writing Direction
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Left to right, starting a new row under the old one - as in English and other European languages.
2as above.
3Right to left, starting a new row under the old one - as in Hebrew.
4Top to bottom, starting a new row to the left of the old one - as in classical Chinese.
5Top to bottom, starting a new row to the right of the old one.
6Boustrophedon: Right to left, then starting a new row under the old one which goes left to right, then right to left again and so on, so that the writing is in one continuous line.
 
 
Stupid Laws
source or inspiration: Eric Cartlock
Thanks to RPGPundit and Forward...to Adventure!
 
Roll 2 dice, use the total.
2You must peace knot your weapons, and your shoelaces.
3You must visit the leader of the settlement and show him your exposed backside, bending over. He will kick you in the rump three times to ensure you're not smuggling any illicit items.
4You can't be on the streets during the waxing of the moon after last bells. The fine is being locked up and the next day pranced around town with coloured ribbons to ward the evil spirits from your body.
5Wineskins must have wine in them. If they don't you're forced to burn them. Also 'iron rations' must have a small ingot of iron in them or they're confiscated. Regular rations are excepted.
6You must be polite to the guards. Any sass and you get a demerit shaped in the form of a round sharp and worn coin to be hung around the neck. Six of them and you have to scrub the local farmers yeast fermenter who supplies the local tavern. 12 and you must marry one of his less marriageable relatives in restitution. The farmer is the mayor and formed the town.
7All weapons must be named. The name must be etched or otherwise inscribed upon the blade or hilt. Non named weapons must have them etched or engraved by the local blacksmith for a fee of 1d6 silver coins.
8Drinking inside the tavern is not permitted. People intending to drink must do so near the 'Puke bowl', a giant round shaped bowl that is the town square. Puking inside the tavern earns a night in the bowl. The bowl is cleaned out once a day and the leavings used as compost. The bar owner has such foul beer that on the first drink typically one must puke. People who are caught during the waxing of the moon are paraded around the puke bowl.
9If you are an outsider to the town you must wear a funny pointed hat that says 'Outsider'. You might get pelted by tomatoes.
10If you pass over the same bridge in the same direction twice, youíre forced to leave town (as it's considered to bring bad luck).
11Of each group of strangers, the guards at the gate let all but one person in. The remaining person must camp outside.
12Players must speak always in the form of questions when bartering for goods in town. If a player breaks this rule before the person selling the goods they must leave the building. The town typically sells the best weapons and armour, claming only crafty people are able to wield the best of gear.
 
 
Temples: What God or Goddess?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Most gods and goddesses will also have minor roles associated with their major one. For example, a god of the sea is likely to also be god of fishing, boats etc. In a society where people only pursued crafts if they were unable to hunt, a god of blacksmiths might also be the god of old age, or of deformity.

Some results are marked with a (+). If you get one of these results, and if the temple is in area where more than one intelligent species lives and intermingles, roll again. On a 1 or 2, the god or goddess used to be whatever the result was, but is now thought of by people in the area as simply a god or goddess of their species. For example: the GM decides to create a temple in a town inhabited by both dwarves and hobbits, for a dwarf god. The GM rolls 6 then 1, getting 'thunder'. They then roll a 1. This means that the god was originally the dwarves' god of thunder, but is now considered (at least in this town) to be simply a god of dwarves.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11roll again: 1-3 king/queen of the gods (+), 4-6 father/mother of the gods (+).
12women.
13men.
14marriage.
15love and beauty.
16marriage, love and beauty.
21fertility and agriculture (+).
22fertility, agriculture, love and sex (+).
23the seas.
24seas and rivers.
25a particular river (roll again if the temple isn't near a major river).
26a particular sea (roll again if the temple isn't near a sea).
31a good god/dess of wealth and prosperity (+).
32a fickle god/dess of wealth and poverty.
33death.
34fire (roll again: In very cold climates 1-3 god/dess of blacksmiths, 4-6 god/dess of the home. In very warm climates 1-3 god/dess of blacksmiths, 4-6 god/dess of disasters In other climates - 1 god/dess of blacksmiths 2-3 god/dess of disasters 4-5 god/dess of the home 6 has a dual nature as both a good and evil god/dess.).
35roll again: 1-2 blacksmiths and magic (+) 3-6 blacksmiths.
36the sun (or one of the suns, if your game world has more than one)(+).
41roll again: 1-2 hunting 3-4 war 5 war and hunting 6 hunting and the wilderness.
42thieves.
43the moon (or one of the moons, if your game world has more than one). If the cycle of the moon in your game world is roughly a month, as it is in the real world, make another roll. On a 1-3 this deity is a goddess, and is also associated with menstruation, and hence fertility..
44roll again: 1-2 art 3-4 music 5-6 art and music.
45wine and/or beer. roll again: 1-2 also food, 3-4 also sex, 5 also music, other than sacred music 6 only wine and/or beer.
46the creator or creators of the universe (+).
51wisdom (+).
52embalming and tombs.
53judgement.
54roll again: 1-4 evil 5-6 magic and evil.
55roll again: 1-3 healing (+) 4-6 healing and magic (+).
56winter.
61thunder (+).
62trickster.
63god/dess of the area that the temple is in.
64floods (may be a good god/dess in areas like ancient Egypt which rely on flooding for agriculture - in this case only, treat as (+)).
65dancing and athletics.
66roll again: 1-2 magic 3-4 magic and healing (+) 5-6 magic and evil.
 
 
Crafts or Trades
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2roll again: 1-3 bowyer (makes bows) 4-6 fletcher (makes arrows).
13-4roll again: 1-3 baker 4-6 butcher.
15-6carpenter (boatbuilder).
21-2carpenter (buildings).
23-4carpenter (furniture).
25-6carpenter (decorative).
31-2cartwright (makes carts).
33-4clockmaker (or sundials, depending on your campaign world).
35-6cobbler (shoemaker).
41-2cook.
43-4cooper (barrel-maker).
45-6house painter.
51-2jeweller.
53-4leather worker.
55-6potter.
61-2stonemason.
63-4tailor.
65-6weaver.
 
 
Market Days
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
The result is the number of market days per week. A result of zero means that there are no regular market days Ė the settlement will be visited by individual merchants at irregular intervals.
Settlements of more than 3000 people are likely to have more than one marketplace (they will certainly have more than one actual market day a week), and may also have specialist permanent markets dealing with specific things.
 
Roll 1 dice.
dice roll
population123456
1-150000001
150-320001112
320-500011122
500-1000112223
1000-2000223334
2000+234567
 
 
Market Stalls
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
The number of stalls at a market will be roughly equal to the population of the settlement, divided by 100, but a minimum of about 10.
 
For each stall, roll 2 dice for a settlement of 500 people or less, or 3 dice for a larger settlement. Use the total in either case.
2Agricultural produce (eg fruit, vegetables, wheat).
3Agricultural produce as above.
4Dairy produce (eg milk, cheese).
5Fish if the settlement is near a large river or the sea, meat otherwise.
6Fish or meat as above.
7Livestock.
8Prepared food and/or drink.
9Prepared food and/or drink.
10Cloth goods.
11Leather goods.
12Metal goods.
13Armour and/or weapons.
14Roll on Businesses Table 1.
15Roll on Businesses Table 1.
16Roll on Businesses Table 2.
17Roll on Businesses Table 3.
18Roll on Businesses Table 4.
 
 
Buildings In Settlements
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
If the result is 'private house', you may roll again until you get a 'Business Table' result, then roll on that to determine the occupant's profession.
A tenement is a multi-storey building divided into a number of dwellings, usually in a poor and over-crowded condition.
 
Roll 2 dice, use the total.
dice roll
Area23456789101112
Settlement of 500 people or lessemptyprivate houseprivate houseprivate houseRoll on Businesses Table 1Roll on Businesses Table 1Roll on Businesses Table 1Roll on Businesses Table 1Roll on Businesses Table 1Roll on Businesses Table 1Roll on Businesses Table 1
Poor District of a Town or Cityemptyprivate houseprivate houseprivate housetenementtenementRoll on Businesses Table 1Roll on Businesses Table 1Roll on Businesses Table 1Roll on Businesses Table 2Roll on Businesses Table 3
Merchant District of a Town or Cityemptyprivate houseprivate housetenementRoll on Businesses Table 1Roll on Businesses Table 1Roll on Businesses Table 2Roll on Businesses Table 2Roll on Businesses Table 3Roll on Businesses Table 3Roll on Businesses Table 4
Wealthy District of a Town or Cityemptyprivate houseprivate houseprivate houseprivate houseRoll on Businesses Table 2Roll on Businesses Table 3Roll on Businesses Table 4Roll on Businesses Table 4Roll on Businesses Table 4Roll on Businesses Table 4
 
 
Businesses In Settlements
source or inspiration: Medieval Demographics Made Easy
 
This chart is an easy, mostly non-random way to determine whether a settlement will have a particular kind of business, or how many it will have.
Find the type of business, and divide the population of the settlement by the number in the '1 in..' column. The result is the number of that kind of business.
For example, in a settlement of 4000 people, you'd expect to find 2 copyists, because 4000 divided by 2000 is 2.
If you want, you can treat fractions as a chance of having the relevant business. For example, for a settlement of 5000 people, the result for 'inns' is 2 and a half. You might decide that if you roll 1-3 there'll be two inns, or if you roll 4-6 there'll be three.
 
Type of Business1 in..
Bakers800
Barbers350
Bathers1900
Beer-Sellers1400
Blacksmiths1500
Bleachers2100
Bookbinders3000
Booksellers6300
Buckle Makers1400
Butchers1200
Carpenters550
Chandlers700
Chicken Butchers1000
Coopers700
Copyists2000
Cutlers2300
Doctorsacademically trained doctors - 1700; doctors in total - 350
Fishmongers1200
Furriers250
Glovemakers2400
Harness-Makers2000
Hatmakers950
Hay Merchants2300
Illuminators3900
Inns2000
Jewelers400
Locksmiths1900
Magic-Shops2800
Maidservants250
Masons500
Mercers700
Old-Clothes400
Painters1500
Pastrycooks500
Plasterers1400
Pursemakers1100
Roofers1800
Ropemakers1900
Rugmakers2000
Saddlers1000
Scabbardmakers850
Sculptors2000
Shoemakers150
Spice Merchants1400
Tailors250
Tanners2000
Taverns/Restaurants400
Watercarriers850
Weavers600
Wine-Sellers900
Woodcarvers2400
Woodsellers2400
 
 
Empty Buildings In Settlements - Secret Uses
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 1 dice. If the result is 1-5, the building is genuinally abandoned. On a six, roll on this table:
 
Roll 1 dice.
1By criminals.
2By a secret religious group.
3By travellers or squatters.
4By secret lovers.
5By local children.
6As a place to fight duels.
 
 
Empty Buildings In Settlements - Condition
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
You may also roll 1 dice to see if the building is haunted (1-5 no, 6 yes)
 
Roll 1 dice.
1As sound as if it was lived in (roll again 1-2 including furnishings, 3-4 with mouldering and/or broken furnishings, 5-6 stripped bare of furnishings).
2Some signs of decay, but still sound (roll again 1-3 mouldering and/or broken furnishings, 4-6 stripped bare of furnishings).
3Dangerously decayed: floorboards may give, roof may collapse etc.
4Dangerously decayed as above.
5The building was never completed (roll again. 1-3 treat as dangerously decayed, 4-6 treat as ruins).
6Ruins: burnt out, collapsed in a hurricane, abandoned for centuries or similar.
 
 
Businesses Table 1
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Baker.
12Barn.
13Blacksmith.
14Boat Builder (roll again if not near a lake, sea or large river).
15Brewer.
16Builder.
21Butcher.
22Carpenter.
23Cart Maker.
24Cobbler.
25Cooper (barrel maker).
26Coppersmith, brass or lead worker.
31Farmer - livestock.
32Farmer - grain.
33Farmer - fruit.
34Farmer - general.
35Farmer - general.
36General trader.
41Horse trader.
42Inn.
43Laundry.
44Leather worker.
45Mill (water or wind).
46Potter.
51Roofer or Thatcher.
52Sail maker (roll again if not near a lake, sea or large river).
53Sharpener.
54Shepherd.
55Stable.
56Stonemason.
61Tavern.
62Temple or shrine.
63Tinker.
64Warehouse (roll again for contents).
65Weaver.
66Wheelwright.
 
 
Businesses Table 2
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Animal Trader.
12Animal Trainer.
13Armourer.
14Astrologer or Fortune Teller.
15Baker.
16Baker.
21Barber.
22Blacksmith.
23Boat Builder (roll again if not near a lake, sea or large river).
24Bow maker.
25Brewer.
26Butcher.
31Candle Maker.
32Carpet Maker.
33Cartographer (map maker).
34Clock Maker.
35Coppersmith.
36Dried Meat Seller.
41Engraver.
42Fletcher (arrow maker).
43Flower Seller.
44Food Seller.
45Food Seller.
46Food Seller.
51Fruit Seller.
52Fruit Seller.
53Furniture Maker.
54Furrier.
55General Trader.
56General Trader.
61General Trader.
62General Trader.
63Guild Headquarters.
64Herb Seller.
65Horn Worker.
66Horse Trader.
 
 
Businesses Table 3
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Horse Trainer.
12Inn.
13Jeweller.
14Lead Smith.
15Leather Worker.
16Linen Maker.
21Locksmith and Key Maker.
22Pawnshop.
23Net Maker.
24Outfitter.
25Paper and Ink Seller.
26Moneylender.
31Perfumer.
32Potter.
33Roofer or Thatcher.
34Rope Maker.
35Sail Maker (roll again if not near a lake, sea or large river).
36Silk Trader.
41Soap Maker.
42Tailor.
43Stables.
44Stonemason.
45Sword Smith.
46Spice Trader.
51Tattooist.
52Tavern.
53Taxidermist.
54Temple or Shrine.
55Undertaker.
56Vet.
61Warehouse (roll again for contents).
62Warehouse (roll again for contents).
63Warehouse (roll again for contents).
64Wine Seller.
65Weapon Trainer.
66Weaver.
 
 
Businesses Table 4
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Alchemist.
12Architect.
13Animal Trader.
14Animal Trainer.
15Artist.
16Astrologer.
21Bird Trader.
22Food Seller.
23Courthouse.
24Court Official.
25Clockmaker.
26Flower Seller.
31Furrier.
32Gambling Hall.
33Goldsmith.
34Guild Headquarters.
35Inn.
36Jeweller.
41Lawyer.
42Public Baths.
43Musical Instruments.
44Musician or Entertainer.
45Physician.
46Locksmith and key maker.
51Sea Captain (roll again if not near a lake, sea or large river).
52Silversmith.
53Scholar.
54Soldier.
55Sorcerer.
56Stable.
61Spice Merchant.
62Tavern.
63Temple or Shrine.
64Warehouse (roll again for contents).
65Weapon Shop.
66Wine Seller.
 
 
Quality of a Shop, Inn or Tavern
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
If the establishment has more than one distinct product, you might want to roll separately for each one (for example, you might roll separately for an inn's food, alcohol and rooms).
 
Roll 1 dice. In a wealthy area, add 1. In a poor area, subtract 1.
roll, modified if appropriate
0 or 1Awful
2Poor
3Average
4Fair
5Good
6 or 7Great
 
 
Number of Customers in an Inn or Tavern
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
The difference between an inn and a tavern is that an inn rents rooms to travellers, and so will have bedrooms, stables etc. Both inns and taverns sell alcohol, and may also sell food.
Cross-reference the time of day with the area. The result is the number of dice that must be rolled and totalled, not the number of customers.
There will also be 1-3 people working in the place.
Note that this table is intended for inns and taverns in settlements of any size - smaller settlements will have less people, but also less places to go.
On the road, travellers will only find inns. Modify the result depending on how busy the road is.
 
Time of day
AreaMorningAfternoonEveningNight
Poor District, or on the road4465
Merchant District4562
Wealthy District2461
 
 
Inn or Tavern Names 1: Basic Structure
source or inspiration: Abulafia, under the terms of their Creative Commons license.
 
Replace '(noun)' with a roll on Inn or Tavern Names 2: Nouns,
and '(adjective)' with a roll on Inn or Tavern Names 3: Adjectives.
If you get '(number)', roll a dice for the number, but count a 1 or a 6 as 3.
Obviously you should substitute any animals etc that don't exist in your game world.
Note also that only taverns and inns in cities or large towns need to have names.
Inns in small villages might be known simply as 'the inn', or 'Mrs Smith's inn' if there's a need to distinguish one from another.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1The (noun).
2The (number)(noun)s.
3The (noun) and (noun) [note: If you get the same noun twice, re-roll the second one].
4Roll again: 1-3 The (noun)'s Arms 4-6 The (noun)'s Head [Note: if the (noun) wouldn't have a head, eg 'wheatsheaf', use 'The (noun)'s Arms'. 'Arms' usually refers to a coat of arms rather than to limbs, so 'The Bull's Arms' for example makes sense].
5The (adjective)(noun) [Note: re-roll the adjective if it only applies to living things and the noun isn't living].
6The (number)(adjective)(noun)s [see note above].
 
 
Inn or Tavern Names 2: Nouns
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Crown.
12Lion.
13Oak.
14Swan.
15Hart.
16Plough.
21Horse.
22Bell.
23Ship.
24Rose.
25Wheatsheaf.
26Queen.
31Prince.
32Hound.
33Keys.
34Star.
35Castle.
36Sun.
41Anchor.
42Bull.
43Coach.
44Hare.
45Horseshoe.
46Dragon.
51Nag.
52Fox.
53Lamb.
54Mason.
55Beehive.
56Man.
61Traveller.
62Forester.
63Wagon.
64Mermaid.
65Hobbit.
66Witch.
 
 
Inn or Tavern Names 3: Adjectives
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Red.
14-6Royal.
21-3White.
24-6New.
31-3Black.
34-6Golden.
41-3Old.
44-6Green.
51-3Ancient.
54-6Dancing.
61-3Mournful.
64-6Merry.
 
 
Settlements: Special Features
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 3 times for large cities, twice for medium cities, or once for small cities.
Large towns have a 4 in 6 chance of 1 special feature, Small towns 2 in 6, and villages 1 in 6.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2A well-known sacred site or temple.
13-4An oracle.
15-6A renowned artisan.
21-2A wise philosopher.
23-4A great work of art.
25-6The site of a famous battle.
31-2Regular athletic games.
33-4A curse.
35-6A divine blessing.
41-2A prophecy of doom.
43-4A prophecy of greatness.
45-6A haunted place.
51-2An unliving guardian.
53-4Plagued by bandits.
55-6Plagued by monsters.
61-2Plagued by the flaws of its own inhabitants.
63-4A widely-loved local dish.
65-6Long-past, and possibly legendary days of glory.
 
 
Settlements or Countries: Peace
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Very peaceful: there has been no war in living memory.
2Peaceful: there has been no war in the last generation.
3Average: not currently at war, but there has been one in this generation.
4Average as above.
5Warlike: at war with a neighbouring group.
6Very warlike: at war with all their neighbours.
 
 
Settlements or Countries: Prosperity
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 2 dice, and take the total.
Add 2 if very peaceful, or 1 if peaceful (results over 12 count as 12)
Subtract 2 if very warlike, or 1 if warlike (results less than 2 count as 2)
 
2Very Poor: roll twice on the Economic Misfortune table.
3Poor: roll once on the Economic Misfortune table.
4Poor as above.
5Poor as above.
6Average: Roll once on the Economic Misfortune table, and once on the Economic Fortune table. Contradictory results cancel each other out.
7Average as above.
8Average as above.
9Prosperous: Roll once on the Economic Fortune table.
10Prosperous as above.
11Prosperous as above.
12Very Prosperous: Roll twice on the Economic Fortune table.
 
 
Economic Misfortune
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Bad Communications: all goods cost 10% extra.
2No Mines: all goods of stone or metal cost 20% extra.
3Shortage of Artisans: all goods of a particular type cost twice as much (roll again: 1 weapons, 2 armour and shields, 3 wheeled transport, 4 ships, 5 horses, 6 all non-weapon metal goods).
4Low Population: no mercenaries or servants may be hired.
5Meagre Vineyards: Wine costs three times as much.
6Barren Fields: Food costs twice as much.
 
 
Economic Fortune
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Good Communications: all goods cost 5% less.
2Rich Mines: all goods of stone or metal cost 10% less.
3Master Artisans: all goods of a particular type cost 20% less (roll again: 1 weapons, 2 armour and shields, 3 wheeled transport, 4 ships, 5 horses, 6 all non-weapon metal goods).
4High Population: mercenaries may be hired for 10% less.
5Lush Vineyards: Wine is half price.
6Bountiful Fields: Food is half price.
 
 
Settlements or Countries: Happiness
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 2 dice, and take the total. Apply the following modifiers (results less than 2 count as 2, and over 12 count as 12):
Very Peaceful +2
Peaceful +1
Warlike -1
Very Warlike -2
Very Prosperous +2
Prosperous +1
Poor -1
Very Poor -2
 
2Very Unhappy: The area is frequently at war with itself..
3Very Unhappy as above.
4Very Unhappy as above.
5Unhappy: there is unrest and conflict.
6Unhappy as above.
7Indifferent: there is conflict and intrigue among the rulers, but the general population is rather content.
8Indifferent as above.
9Happy.
10Happy.
11Very Happy.
12Very Happy.
 
 
Settlements or Countries: Justice
source or inspiration: Mazes and Minotaurs
 
Roll 2 dice, and take the total. Apply the following modifiers (results less than 2 count as 2, and over 12 count as 12):
Very Unhappy -2
Unhappy -1
Happy +1
Very Happy +2
 
2No Justice: Courts and officials will always accept a sufficiently large bribe.
3Weak Justice: Courts and officials are easily bribed.
4Weak Justice as above.
5Indifferent Justice: Some judges and officials are corrupt, but most are honest.
6Indifferent Justice as above.
7Indifferent Justice as above.
8Indifferent Justice as above.
9Indifferent Justice as above.
10Strong Justice: It is very hard to bribe, sway or threaten any court or official.
11Strong Justice as above.
12Adamant Justice: It is absolutely impossible to bribe, sway or threaten any court or official.
 
 
Weather
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 3 dice, and look up the total in the column for the approprite season. This table assumes that the area has a wide variety of weather, from heatwaves to snow.

Snow: roll 1 dice, and multiply the result by 10 to get the resulting depth of snow in centimetres. Roll 1 dice and multiply by 4 to get the depth in inches.

To see if the weather is the same the next day, roll 1 dice:
Summer or Winter:
1-3 same weather as yesterday.
4-6 roll again on the weather chart.
Spring or Autumn:
1-2 same weather as yesterday.
3-6 roll again on the weather chart.
 
season
dice rollSpringSummerAutumn/FallWinter
3HotHeatwaveHotSunny
4SunnyHotSunnyBright
5SunnyHotBrightBreezy
6BrightSunnyBreezyDull
7BrightSunnyDullMist
8BreezyBrightDullWindy
9DullBrightMistOvercast
10DullBreezyMistOvercast
11MistDullWindyLight Rain
12WindyMistOvercastHeavy Rain
13OvercastWindyLight RainHeavy Rain
14Light RainOvercastHeavy RainFog
15Light RainLight RainHeavy RainFog
16Heavy RainLight RainFogSleet
17FogHeavy RainFogSnow
18SleetFogSleetSnow
 
 
Trial Results
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
The GM should usually modify the results of this table depending on the severity of the crime, whether the accused is likeable and believable, whether they're innocent, bribery if relevant, and the quality of legal argument on both sides.
Heavy Fine - ranges from 100 gold pieces for a peasant, to 600 for a noble.
If you don't want to make it dependent on social class, roll 1 dice and multiply by 100.
Light Fine - ranges from 3 or 4 gold pieces for a peasant, up to roughly 20 for a noble.
If you don't want to make it dependent on social class, roll 2 dice and multiply one by the other.
Compensation - ranges from 10 gold pieces for a peasant, up to 60 for a noble.
If you don't want to make it dependent on social class, roll 1 dice and multiply by 10.
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Death - roll on the Methods of Execution Table below.
13-4Mutilated - roll on the Mutilation table below.
15-6Tortured.
21-2Enslaved for 4-24 years (roll 4 dice).
23-4Jailed - roll on the Jail Sentence Length table below, and multiply by 5.
25-6Hard labour for the government for 1-6 years (roll 1 dice).
31-2Jailed - roll on the Jail Sentence Length table below, and multiply by 3.
33-4Jailed - roll on the Jail Sentence Length table below, and multiply by 2.
35-6Jailed - roll on the Jail Sentence Length table below.
41-2Exiled from the area.
43-4Whipped.
45-6In the stocks for 2-12 days (roll 2 dice.
51-2In the stocks for 1-6 days (roll 1 dice).
53-4Heavy Fine - see notes.
55-6Light Fine - see notes.
61-2Found Innocent.
63-4Found Innocent, and no record kept.
65-6Found Innocent, no record kept, and paid compensation (see notes).
 
 
Jail Sentence Length
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Generally the GM should multiply the result here by a factor of up to 5, depending on the seriousness of the crime.
If you're sent to this table from the Trial Results table, it will tell you what to multiply the result by.
 
Roll 2 dice, use the total.
2One day.
3One week.
4Two weeks.
5One month.
6Six months.
7One year.
8Two years.
9Three years.
10Five years.
11Ten years.
12Twenty years.
 
 
Mutilation
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
This table may be used to generate a random punishment, or to personalise NPCs.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Finger.
2Hand.
3Arm.
4Nose.
5Ear.
6Eye.
 
 
Methods of Execution
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3Torn apart by four horses.
14-6Smothered.
21-3Impaled.
24-6Hurled from a catapult.
31-3Beheaded.
34-6Shot with arrows.
41-3Drowned.
44-6Burnt at the stake.
51-3Hanged.
54-6Sent to the gladiatorial arena.
61-3Drawn and quartered.
64-6Some form of execution unique to the area, and usually magical or mechanical - for example death by clockwork ogre.
 
 
City Rumours
source or inspiration: Advanced Fighting Fantasy
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11Members of a new gang have blocked a street and demand a toll from all who pass.
12A master thief has seen the face of the ruler of the city, and yet lived.
13An annoying beggar has just been turned into a frog.
14A body has been pulled from the river, the name of an ancient and evil god carved into its forehead.
15A beggar knows a secret entrance into the palace dungeons.
16A goblin has been seen flying around a wizardís tower using a pair of artificial wings.
21The heads of the Assassinís Guild meet every week in the back room of a local inn.
22This morning a wine merchant found a strange potion in one of his shipments.
23An eagle has just carried off a baby from a balcony.
24The landlord of a local inn is really a werewolf.
25A merchant has just been robbed of a massive gem by a trained monkey.
26A pirate galley has sunk, blocking the harbour mouth.
31A cart overturned in the high street, releasing a small dragon.
32A merchant is looking for bodyguards for a journey through wild hills.
33The ruler of the city has just left port in his galley, for some piracy.
34Someone is putting poison in the beer in both of two rival pubs.
35A wizard has just turned the Captain of the City Guard into a pig.
36A flower shop has a hoard of treasure hidden in its cellar.
41A covered wagon has overturned, spilling hundreds of 3 silver piece coins into the street. The city doesnít have a 3 silver piece coin.
42An aged, foreign sage is gathering mercenaries for a dangerous expedition into the desert.
43A master thief will be executed by being hurled out of a catapult at noon tomorrow unless he can prove his innocence.
44A new playwright has set the stage on fire, literally.
45A new tax starts today on all magicians. Many are trying to get themselves re-classified as astrologers or fortune tellers.
46Prominent thieves are looking for someone without scruples, for a dangerous job.
51An evil sorcerer is terrorising a small town nominally ruled by the city.
52Last night a mysterious elf bet their life and won 50,000 gold pieces.
53A number of half-fish, half-humans have been seen around the river bank at dusk.
54The house of an alchemist has just disappeared in a cloud of purple and green smoke.
55A candle maker has hundreds of gold thousands of gold pieces hidden around his house, each coin in a different place.
56Drinking ten mugs of the house ale at a local pub gives you the strength of a giant.
61A moneylender is looking for someone discreet, for a 'delicate' job.
62A spice-merchant is a collector of rare magical items.
63Two dozen of the City Guard have been executed for holding on to tax money.
64A local lamplighter is the person to talk to if you want information on those who come out at night.
65An evil temple wants someone to retrieve an ancient scroll from the sewers.
66A famous foreign gladiator is appearing at the arena tonight.
 
 
Physical Henchman Quirk
source or inspiration: Fell
Thanks to RPGPundit and Forward...to Adventure!
 
If you get the result 'unnatural hair colour', roll another dice:
1 - Pink
2 - Blue
3 - Green
4 - Steel
5 - Gun Metal
6 - Roll twice more, ignoring this result - hair is striped.

If you get the result 'zits that form a pattern', roll another dice:
1 - The Word Redrum
2 - A player character's name
3 - A constellation
4 - The answer to a later puzzle
5 - A smiley face
6 - Roll twice more, ignoring this result - one on each cheek.
 
Roll 4 dice, use the total.
4Scar over left eye.
5Facial birthmark identical to one of the players favorite weapons.
6Unnatural hair color (includes any facial and body hair, and see note above).
7A broken arrow tip still lodged into the neck..
8An eye replaced by a gold coin.
9The word 'Liar' carved into his forehead.
10Teeth replaced with small dragon scales.
11Armor painted with bright red paint.
12Surgically implanted whiskers.
13A tattoo on his bare chest that reads 'I'm with stupid' and the arrow pointing up.
14A leash around his neck and another henchman holding the other end.
15A massive goiter.
16One knee that bends backwards causing him to walk with an crooked gait.
17Perfectly white teeth, so perfect they shine.
18A nose that has clearly been running for quite some time, covering the face in snot.
19A very fine hat, but otherwise a disheveled and filthy appearance.
20A wooden leg that appears to be made from a still living treant.
21Zits that form a pattern (see note above).
22A cape accidentally tucked into the back of his underwear.
23A noose worn around the neck, an hourglass dangling from its tie.
24Roll twice on this chart, ignoring this result.
 
 
Outsiders In a Group 1: Why Are They There?
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table is intended for such things as a human living in a tribe of orcs (or vice versa).
 
Roll 1 dice.
1A scholar studying them.
2A priest, trying to convert them (optionally, roll on the Missionary Attitude table below).
3Exiled from their own society (optionally, roll again: 1-3 justly, 4-6 unjustly).
4Was found or taken by the group as a baby (optionally roll again: 1-3 found, 4-6 taken).
5A trader.
6Fell in love with one of the group.
 
 
Outsiders In a Group 2: Social Status
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table only refers to the subject's status in the group;
their status in the society they came from may be very different.
 
Roll 1 dice.
1Lower status than most members of the group.
2Lower status than most members of the group.
3Accepted in the group.
4Accepted in the group.
5Accepted in the group.
6Higher status than most members of the group.
 
 
Missionary Attitude
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table gives a missionary's attitude to the people (or otherwise) they're trying to convert.
It assumes the missionary comes from a different culture.
It also gives the opportunity to make jokes about 'the missionary's position.'
 
Roll 1 dice.
1The missionary believes their hosts' religion is outright evil.
2The missionary has become unsure of what they believe. Roll again, ignoring this result, for the belief they most tend to.
3The missionary believes their hosts are good, but their religion is mistaken.
4The missionary believes their hosts' religion is an unclear, distorted, or primitive version of the priest's own.
5The missionary has started to take on some of the ideas of their hosts.
6The missionary has come to believe that the group's religion is a superior version of the priest's own.
 
 
Prisoners of Evil
source or inspiration: AEG's 'Toolbox'.
 
This table is intended for prisoners discovered in an area dominated by a mostly evil society
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3One who was taken for ransom. Roll again: 1-2 a merchant, 3-4 a noble, 5-6 a priest or shaman.
14-6One who came here to study their craft but fell afoul of the inhabitants. Roll again: 1-3 an assassin, 4-6 a necromancer.
21-3A sick and weakened warrior, the only survivor of an assault on the place.
24-6A thief who sought to make their reputation by stealing from this well-known den of evil.
31-3A berserker, of the same people as the owners of the prison. They are kept captive and only let out for battle, and begs the players to help them escape.
34-6A farmer, captured in a raid and worked half to death as a slave.
41-3One in their dotage, who has been kept captive so long they can't remember who they were or how they were captured.
44-6An illusionist, who has stayed alive by using their art to entertain their captors (optionally roll again: 1-3 they use genuine magic 4-6 they use tricks, like 'magicians' in the real world).
51-3A priest of a benign deity. Their captors have already ritually prepared them for sacrifice.
54-6A good member of the evil community, who naturally rebelled against their rulers.
61-3Roll again, ignoring this result or the one below, but the prisoner is dead. Then roll again: 1 they have written their story on some paper which is on their corpse, 2 As 1 but the paper is hidden in the cell, 3-6 no such paper can be found.
64-6Roll again, ignoring this result or the one above. The prisoner pretends to be whatever result is rolled. Then roll again: 1-3 they're actually working for the rulers of the place 4-6 they really are a prisoner, but lie about how they got here.
 
 
Attitudes to Strangers
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
This table is useful to decide how a group, whether human or not, will react to strangers (most obviously the player characters)
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-3They will attack or harass anyone who enters their territory.
14-6They will allow travellers to pass through their territory by a particular route, but attack them if they leave the route. They may also attack travellers who stop for too long.
21-3They may hide from travellers, or attack them, depending on how strong the travellers seem.
24-6They will hide from travellers. If cornered they will fight or give in, depending on how strong the travellers seem. If the travellers take any of their goods they may pursue them.
31-3They will be friendly to strangers, but won't give any help unless it's paid for (payment isn't necessarily in the form of currency). If the travellers are obviously close to death they will help, but expect payment afterwards. If the travellers take something without paying there is likely to be violence - either immediately if they're powerful enough, or as soon as they can call the sheriff / get a mob together.
34-6As above, but if the travellers are close to death they will help without expecting payment.
41-3As above, As above, but if the travellers are close to death they will help without expecting payment, and they will give information for free, only expecting payment for more substantial forms of help.
44-6They will give food, water and shelter to any travellers without expecting payment, but out of duty rather than inclination. They won't offer any help unless asked, or unless the travellers are obviously in a bad way, and will grudgingly give the minimum their code allows.
51-3They will willingly give food, water and shelter and offer any information they can, without expecting payment.
54-6As above, but if able they will willingly give other help, for example offering fresh horses or volunteering to guide the strangers.
61-3Roll twice more, ignoring this result or the one below. The better result applies to their own kin, the worse result to anyone else. 'Kin' may mean members of their own species, or a sub-group of that species, or a group defined in another way such as followers of a particular religion.
64-6Their reaction may be any that appear on this table, depending on a complicated system of omens, their mood at the time, or other factors: roll for each individual group of travellers, or even each individual traveller. There should be no rhyme or reason to their actions - they may attack a large well-armed group but hide from an individual, then give their best horses to speed the journey of the next person who passes through.
 
 
Unusual City Locations
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-2Flies - on the back of a giant animal.
13-4Flies - by magic.
15-6Flies - by mechanical means.
21-2Is on an island in the middle of a lake.
23-4Is a series of ships linked together.
25-6Was originally a large tomb, and was colonised until it became a city (roll again 1-3 a single giant tomb, 4-6 a 'necropolis' - a series of small tombs).
31-2Was originally a craft from another world, and was turned into a city (roll again 1-2 the inhabitants are descendents of the craft's crew, 3-4 the inhabitants are from the normal game world, 5 descendents of locals and aliens both live in the city, 6 most inhabitants of the city are descended from both aliens and locals).
33-4Under the sea (optionally roll again 1-3 the inhabitants are sea creatures such as mermaids and mermen, 4 the inhabitants are biologically land-dwellers - the city is protected from the sea by a dome 5 as 4, but the city is a giant mechanical construction like a submarine 6 as 4&5, but the city is in the belly of a giant sea creature).
35-6In the belly of a living creature (roll again 1-3 the creature is stationary, 4-6 it moves around frequently).
41-2The city is the 'head' of a giant mechanical creature (roll again 1-3 the creature is stationary, 4-6 it moves around frequently).
43-4On the back of a giant sea creature, which cruises just below the surface so that most of the city is above the waves.
45-6In a hollowed out mountain. However the inhabitants aren't dwarves or other subterranean folk, but surface-dwellers who are attempting to hide.
51-2The whole city is the size of a human fist, and may only be entered or exited by magical means.
53-4What looks like a painting of the city is actually the city's only entrance.
55-6What looks like a book about the city is actually the city's only entrance.
61-2What looks like a map of the city is actually the city's only entrance.
63-4A failed magical experiment causes the city to disappear from one location and appear at another, apparently randomly.
65-6Any door in the world may be an entrance to the city.
 
 
Countries 1: Country Size
source or inspiration: James Hutchings
 
Roll 2 dice.
1st dice2nd diceresult
11-31000 square miles, or 2500 square kilometres (roughly the size of Luxembourg).
14-62000 square miles, or 5000 square kilometres.
21-34000 square miles, or 10000 square kilometres.
24-68000 square miles, or 20000 square kilometres (roughly the size of Portugal).
31-312000 square miles, or 30000 square kilometres.
34-618000 square miles, or 45000 square kilometres.
41-324000 square miles, or 60000 square kilometres.
44-632000 square miles, or 80000 square kilometres (roughly the size of Scotland).
51-348000 square miles, or 120000 square kilometres (roughly the size of England or Mississippi).
54-664000 square miles, or 160000 square kilometres.
61-3128000 square miles, or 320000 square kilometres (roughly the size of Italy).
64-6256000 square miles, or 640000 square kilometres (roughly the size of Texas).
 
 
Countries 2: Total Population
source or inspiration: Medieval Demographics Made Easy
 
If you intend to use the 'Climate' table below, roll on that table first. Then, when rolling on this table, adjust as follows:
  • very cold or desert-like - don't roll. Count as if you'd rolled a 1 on this table.
  • mild - roll and add 1. Count a result of 7 as 6.
  • hot and dry or cold - roll and subtract 2. Count a result of 0 or -1 as 1.
  • hot and damp - roll and add 2. Count a result of 7 or 8 as 6.
  •  
    Roll 1 dice.
    110 people per square mile, or 4 per square kilometre.
    220 people per square mile, or 8 per square kilometre.
    340 people per square mile, or 16 per square kilometre (roughly equal to the medieval British Isles).
    460 people per square mile, or 24 per square kilometre.
    580 people per square mile, or 32 per square kilometre.
    6100 people per square mile, or 40 per square kilometre (roughly equal to medieval France).
     
     
    Countries 3: Largest City
    source or inspiration: Medieval Demographics Made Easy
     
    To find the population of the largest city in an area, first find the square root of the area's total population. Then multiply by...
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1ten.
    2twelve.
    3fourteen.
    4sixteen.
    5eighteen.
    6twenty.
     
     
    Countries 4: Second Largest City's Population
    source or inspiration: Medieval Demographics Made Easy
     
    Roll 2 dice, use the total.
    2One-tenth the size of the largest city.
    3as above.
    4one-fifth the size of the largest city.
    5three-tenths the size of the largest city.
    6two-fifths the size of the largest city.
    7half the size of the largest city.
    8three-fifths the size of the largest city.
    9seven-tenths the size of the largest city.
    10four-fifths the size of the largest city.
    11nine-tenths the size of the largest city.
    12there are two cities with virtually the same population, both claiming to be the largest city.
     
     
    Countries 5: Capital
    source or inspiration: James Hutchings
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1The largest city is the capital, the second-largest city is the commercial centre of the country.
    2The second-largest city is the capital, the largest city is the commercial centre of the country.
    3There is no capital: the ruler travels from area to area.
    4The largest city is the capital, the second-largest city the former capital.
    5The second-largest city is officially the capital, but in practice most government business happens in the largest city.
    6A city which isn't one of the two largest cities is the capital. This city is likely to be almost completely devoted to government (optionally roll again: on a 1-3, this settlement was made the capital to resolve rivalry between the two largest cities).
     
     
    Countries 6: Other Cities
    source or inspiration: Medieval Demographics Made Easy
     
    Roll on this table only if the second-largest city has a population of 8000 or more. Otherwise continue to 'Countries 7: Number of Towns.'

    If the total population of cities ever goes over the total population of the country, discard the last city you generated and go to 'Countries 7: Number of Towns.'

    Take the last city you generated. The next-largest city has a population which is...
     
    Roll 2 dice, use the total.
    2half the size of the last city. If the new city has a population of 8000 or more, roll again on this table for the next-smallest city.
    3as above.
    4three-fifths the size of the last city. If the new city has a population of 8000 or more, roll again on this table for the next-smallest city.
    5as above.
    6three-quarters the size of the last city. If the new city has a population of 8000 or more, roll again on this table for the next-smallest city.
    7seven-tenths the size of the last city. If the new city has a population of 8000 or more, roll again on this table for the next-smallest city.
    8as above.
    9four-fifths the size of the last city. If the new city has a population of 8000 or more, roll again on this table for the next-smallest city.
    10as above.
    11nine-tenth the size of the last city. If the new city has a population of 8000 or more, roll again on this table for the next-smallest city.
    12as above.
     
     
    Countries 7: Number of Towns
    source or inspiration: Medieval Demographics Made Easy
     
    Towns have an average population of 2,500. The remaining population will live in villages or other small settlements.

    If the total population of the cities plus the towns is higher than the total population of the country, adjust the average population of 'towns' downwards (they may be better described as villages), and assume that virtually no one lives in a smaller settlement.

    Take the number of cities, and multiply it by...
     
    Roll 2 dice, use the total.
    2four.
    3five.
    4six.
    5seven.
    6eight.
    7nine.
    8ten.
    9eleven.
    10twelve.
    11thirteen.
    12fourteen.
     
     
    Countries 8: Most Common Species
    source or inspiration: James Hutchings
     
    This table is for if you want to use more 'traditional' fantasy species.
    If you want to make a species from scratch, use the tables in the 'Creatures' section, but don't accept results of 'Monster' or 'Beast'.

    If you want to make humans more common than other species, you can roll a dice:
    if you get a 1 or 2 (for example), the result is 'humans', otherwise roll on this table.
     
    Roll 2 dice.
    1st dice2nd diceresult
    11-2humans.
    13-4humans, but all or most of them can work magic.
    15-6a non-human species which resembles an idealised version of humans: for example elves.
    21-2fairies.
    23-4a species which lives underground and resembles smaller versions of humans: gnomes, dwarves or similar.
    25-6a species which lives underground and resembles humans, but are less human-like in appearance than the result above: orcs, goblins, trolls or similar.
    31-2giants.
    33-4centaurs - optionally roll again: 1-2 barbaric 3-4 civilised 5-6 both types exist.
    35-6hobbits/halflings.
    41-2dryads and fauns.
    43-4talking animals of all kinds.
    45-6talking animals of a particular kind: roll on the table 'Creatures 5b: Animals' in the 'Creatures' section for which kind. If that species is smaller than a human child, then they're 'giant' versions of the species, whose adults are roughly the size of a human child.
    51-2dragons.
    53-4vampires. roll again: 1-3 they enslave humans as a source of blood 4-5 they manufacture artificial blood 6 they live off the blood of animals.
    55-6a species which resemble a combination of humans and animals: optionally roll on table 9a in the 'Creatures' section for which animal.
    61-2mechanical imitations of existing creatures: roll again, ignoring this result or the two below, for what species they resemble.
    63-4roll again - the people in this country are a mutated version of the result that are only found in this country.
    65-6roll twice more, ignoring this result: the first result is a small ruling class, the second result are more common but enslaved. If you get the same species twice, they believe themselves to be quite different groups - roll again: on a 1-3 the difference is obvious to foreigners, on a 4-6 the difference is impossible to see or imaginary.
     
     
    Climate
    source or inspiration: James Hutchings
     
    In the wilderness, climate will effect how likely the characters are to meet other living things (the more food that grows, the more life an area can support).
    Climates in order from most life to least life are as follows:
  • hot and damp
  • mild
  • hot and dry or cold
  • very cold, or desert-like during the early morning
  • desert-like, at any other time.
  • Dungeons: For more realistic dungeons, take the climate of the surrounding area, but adjust it to reflect the fact that underground areas will be sheltered from extremes of weather:
    • very cold area = cold dungeon.
    • cold, mild, hot and damp, or hot and dry area = mild dungeon.
    • desert-like area = hot and dry dungeon.
    For more traditional dungeons, just roll randomly - either once for the whole dungeon, or seperately for different areas (for example once for each level).

    Climate also effects the characters likelihood of catching diseases - for more detail, see the Disease table (Wilderness, Settlements and Dungeons sections).
     
    Roll 1 dice.
    1very cold - Freezing or below. As for cold (below), but worse. Also, some surfaces may be slippery with ice.
    2cold - Cold, but above freezing. Characters are at risk of suffering damage from the weather. Heavy clothing, shelter, and a fire will all make characters less likely to suffer damage.
    3mild - Characters will suffer no ill effects from the climate.
    4hot and damp - Characters will tire more quickly. Armour will be more of a burden. Wounds will be more likely to become infected.
    5hot and dry - Characters will tire more quickly, and need more water. Armour will be more of a burden - heavier armour is likely to be impossible to wear.
    6desert-like - During the early morning, treat as hot and dry. From mid-morning to sunset, treat as hot and dry only worse. At night, treat as very cold.
     
     
     
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